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Digging in to Save the Earth – Mine Reclamation
 
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By Andrea Hanson Winner, Best Picture, Best Actress, 2016 Laurentian University Eagle Awards (VLWL) Subarctic regions are recognized as one of the largest remaining pristine ecosystems in the world. They have been subject to increasing pressure from mining activities as demands for resources grow. The remote location of these new mining developments pose a challenge for both development and reclamation efforts. In regards to mine reclamation, there is often a shortage of material available to be re-used to create cover soils post closure. Also, it is not ideal to transport external materials to create these cover soils. Therefore, it is important for these developments to explore how they can efficiently use material readily available to them create effective cover soils during the mine reclamation process. Andrea Hanson, a graduate student at Laurentian University, is examining how mines in northern regions can use mineral and organic substrates readily available - including their mining by-products - to create a cover soil with suitable conditions for vegetation establishment during mine reclamation. Her team's research is specifically focused on the reclamation of diamond mine waste at the De Beers Victor Diamond Mine in the Hudson Bay Lowlands of Ontario’s Far North. By determining the most suitable conditions for vegetation establishment, they will provide insight into the challenges associated with re-vegetation of subarctic environments, and provide the Victor Mine with suggestions for a reclamation protocol upon closure. Achieving sustainability for resource exploitation in the subarctic requires a greater understanding of ecosystem processes and rehabilitation potential of these regions.
Views: 4962 Science Communication
Sleep Apnea & Hypertension
 
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Laurentian University graduate student Rebecca Mailloux is studying the effects of intermittent hypoxia on the upregulation of PNMT enzyme leading to hypertension in Obstructive Sleep Apnea patients. Produced by Gabrielle Veilleux, Laurentian University Science Communication class of 2016. Winner, Best Special Effects, 2016 Eagle Awards (SCOM) Winner, Best Actress, 2016 Eagle Awards (SCOM)
Views: 2163 Science Communication
C. difficile: Different Symptoms, Different Strains
 
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Sebastien Lefebvre teaches us about C. difficile in a way that makes it si facile to understand. This video was produced and edited by Science Communication student Erica Richard. Eagle Awards Winner for best director, Erica Richard. Music: Perspectives by Kevin Macleod @ http://incompetech.com/
Views: 3247 Science Communication
Radiation Biology Underground: the REPAIR Project at SNOLAB
 
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Graduate students Jake Pirkkanen and Andrew Zarnke are studying the effects of ultra low background radiation on biological systems using whitefish embryonic development as a model. Their work is part of the REPAIR (Researching the Effects of the Presence and Absence of Ionizing Radiation) project under the supervision of Dr. Doug Boreham with Laurentian University, the Northern Ontario School of Medicine and SNOLAB in Sudbury, Ontario. Produced and edited by Kat Middleton with Gabrielle Veilleux, Laurentian University Science Communication class of 2016, with assistance from Colin Stringer. Winner, Best Editing, 2016 Eagle Awards (SCOM) Honourable Mention, Best Actor, 2016 Eagle Awards (SCOM)
Views: 1163 Science Communication
The Modified Ovitrap - Dr. Gerardo Ulibarri
 
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Dr. Ulibarri created a safe, cheap and effective way to reduce disease-carrying mosquito populations! This video is part of his Grand Challenges grant application. Produced and directed by Kate Henbest.
Views: 4071 Science Communication
True Facts About The Wood Turtle (Zefrank Homage)
 
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Biology Researcher Geoffry Hughes shows us how the wood turtle do. This video was produced and edited by Science Communication student Carly Robillard. Eagle Awards Honourable Mention for best male actor, Geoffry Hughes Music: Tom Moore @ https://soundcloud.com/querflote Sound effects: bennychico11, ermine @ http://www.freesound.org/ Images used: #766848 @ http://www.everystockphoto.com
Views: 27314 Science Communication
The Origin of Life and Magnetic Fields
 
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Join Ryan Bidal on a journey through the watery beginnings of abiogenesis to discover if magnetic fields could have been responsible for the origin of all life on Earth Written, Directed and Produced by Parker McLean, Laurentian University Science Communication class of 2016. Winner, Best Actor, 2016 Eagle Awards (SCOM) Starring Ryan Bidal Original Experiment by Ryan Bidal Special Thanks to Ryan Bidal, Catherine Lau, Colin Stringer, Dr. David Pearson, Dr. Chantal Barriault, Melissa Radey, Dr. Michael Persinger, Tyler August, Science North, Laurentian University.
A Way To Tell
 
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Kristy-Anne Dube Serenades us with her research on C. difficile in B flat major. This video was produced and edited by Science Communication student Robin Yee. Eagle Awards Winner for best editing, Robin Yee and best female actor, Kristy-Anne Dube. Images taken under Creative Commons License from: CDC @ http://phil.cdc.gov/phil/home.asp NIAID @ https://www.flickr.com/photos/niaid/ Learn more about AMRIC's research @ http://www.amric.ca/ Lyrics: Listen here and listen well To the story that I will tell There are worlds inside us all Filled with creatures very small All along our intestines Bacteria are your friend and mine Helping us to digest food And most of them are pretty cool dudes An ecosystem inside of you, together they play well But one bug left on its own will make you feel like hell If there was a way to tell To keep the population well Catching people who are colonized We could open up our eyes to Clostridium difficile, Clostridium difficile C. difficile Infections come in many types From salmonella to E. Coli Antibiotics are prescribed To cause massive bacteriocide C. Difficile can sometimes be A rebel of the first degree Resistant to many antibiotics This little bug can be quite chaotic With all the others gone, any resistant strains run free It’s the worst version of a teenager’s house party If there was a way to tell To keep the population well Catching people who are colonized We could open up our eyes to Clostridium difficile, Clostridium difficile C. difficile I’ve been searching for a protein To change the C. diff. testing scene Clearer results in shorter times Just read right here between these lines! Now your doc has no prediction Of how you’ll react to your prescription Without a fast method of detection The pills can induce a C. diff. infection Imagine if your doctor had a quick and easy test I could decide which antibiotic was best! If there was a way to tell To keep the population well Catching people who are colonized We could open up our eyes If there was a way to tell To keep the population well Catching people who are colonized We could open up our eyes Clostridium difficile, Clostridium difficile Oh, C. difficile
Cold Northern Fate by Alexandra Sumner
 
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Biology Student Alexandra Sumner performs an original song about her Master's project. She is studying lake and watershed characteristics that influence fish mercury concentrations across a latitudinal gradient in Ontario. Science Communication Students, Jillian Leonard and Colin Stringer, produced this video.
The Secret Love Life of Painted Turtles
 
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Patrick Moldowan, biology researcher at Laurentian University, explains his M.Sc. research about the mating of painted turtles. The video was produced by science communication student Sabrina Doyle.
Bioleaching Building Blocks
 
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By Nicole Valiquette Winner, Best Special Effects, 2016 Eagle Awards (VLWL) Using the miniature to mine a massive problem. MSc. candidate Nicole Valiquette explains how the genomics of microbial communities can help to build better bioleaching systems.
Views: 1196 Science Communication
The Case of the Blanding's Butcher
 
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Donnell Gasbarrini Dons her investigative gear to help her solve the Mystery of Misery Bay. This video was produced and edited by Science Communication student Steve Potvin. Eagle Awards Winner for best cinematography, Steve Potvin, and best picture, Steve Potvin and Donnell Gasbarrini. Music: Just as soon by Kevin Macleod @ http://incompetech.com/ Night on the Docks by Kevin Macleod @ http://incompetech.com/
Canada's Most Endangered Mammal
 
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Laurentian University graduate student, Madison Acker - part of the Evolutionary and Behavioural Ecology of Vertebrates Lab within the Centre for Evolutionary Ecology and Ethical Conservation - is researching the amount of stress hormones such as cortisol, found in the hair of wild and zoo born Vancouver Island Marmots. Produced by Lucija Prelovec with the help of Kaitlin Richard, Laurentian University Science Communication class of 2016. Special thanks to the Vancouver Island Marmot Foundation for allowing the use of their footage and photos. Photos Courtesy of: Photo by OpenCage/CC BY-SA 2.5 “Walbran Clearcut” by TJ Watt is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 “World Map” by SSYoung is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 Music Courtesy of: Carefree by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400037 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Transvection with Patrick O'Donnell
 
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M.Sc. Student Patrick O'Donnell researches a genetic mechanism called transvection. Cassandra Elliott and Maxine Myre, Science Communication students produced this video about his research.
Nerve Growth Factor Research at Laurentian University
 
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This video/animation depicts the research of Laurentian University graduate student, Shahira Wahby who is not only a researcher but also a mother. You can imagine the busy schedule she must have, juggling school, research and spending time with her family. As a researcher, Shahira's ultimate goal is to find an alternative treatment for chronic pain, since common treatments are often ineffective and have bad side effects. In light of previous research demonstrating the important role of nerve growth factor or NGF in pain mediation, she is concentrating her efforts on testing inhibitory compounds that target NGF. Produced by Catherine Lau, Laurentian University Science Communication class of 2016. Winner, Best Picture, 2016 Eagle Awards (SCOM) Winner, Best Director, 2016 Eagle Awards (SCOM) Winner, Best Animation, 2016 Eagle Awards (SCOM) Honourable Mention, Best Actress, 2016 Eagle Awards (SCOM)
Behind the Science with Maryam Abdulahad
 
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Have you ever wondered why it’s so hard to find a cure for cancer? One of the reasons is that there are so many different kinds. For example, lymphoma is a well known type of cancer, but within lymphoma there are 60 different variations! And in every cancerous cell there is a unique genetic strand that is person­ specific. Of all the different kinds of lymphoma, aggressive large, so-called B­cell lymphoma is one of the worst. It currently affects over 400,000 people worldwide, and half of those people do not survive it. Biology Master’s student, Maryam Abdulahad, is studying how a promising new drug might help cure this kind of lymphoma. Winner, Best Interview Introduction, 2016 Eagle Awards Featuring Maryam Abdulahad Research by Jessica Shapiro and Parker McLean Interview by Parker McLean Introduction by Jessica Shapiro Filming, Editing by Colin Stringer
Connecting Forests to Lakes
 
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By Kurt Yakimovich Winner, Best Vocal Talent, 2016 Eagle Awards (VLWL) Earth's forests and its 304 million lakes are all interconnected, and are linked via the carbon cycle. Important to this are the microbes, who are responsible for the decomposition of leaf litter. Narrated by masters student Kurt Yakimovich, this video introduces viewers to the topic, and profiles Kurt's on-going research at Vale Living with Lakes Centre, in collaboration with Cambridge University.
Recovery of Junction Creek
 
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By Amanda Wittmann Honorable Mention, Best Actress, 2016 Eagle Awards (VLWL) If you have ever been to Sudbury, you have probably drove by or over by Junction Creek, whether you knew it or not. Junction Creek has felt the effects from the last 100 years or so of mining and smelting operations in Sudbury, as well as the subsequent 90% decrease in emissions and Sudbury Regreening. My project focuses on the recovery of Junction Creek, which will be assessed through studying water samples and different biotic communities. Changes will be studied both temporally and spatially to decipher the effect that different treatment methods have on stream health. The situation that Junction Creek is in is a rare one, and hopefully this study can shed some light into the world of moving aquatic ecosystems affected by some of the world’s largest mining operations.
Saving Turtles at Risk Today
 
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Biology Student Hannah McCurdy-Adams studies nest predation and human influence on turtles in Ontario. She outlines ways you can help turtles at risk. Science Communication Students, Nicole Berreth and Anik Brazeau produced this video.
Peatland Microbes and Climate Change
 
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This video features Laurentian University student Michelle Dart and was produced by Science Communication students Meerna Homayed and Jamie Mistry. This video was created as a culminating project of Wiebke Finkler's video production workshop.
Can Organisms Communicate Through Electromagnetic Fields?
 
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Master's Student Trevor Carniello researches whether different types of organisms can transfer some sort of information function across space and time. Video produced by Science Communication Students, Ashley Miller, Michelle Di Cintio, and McKenna Elsasser.
Mine Restoration: The Search for Seeds
 
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This video features Laurentian University student Brittany Rantala-Sykes and was produced by Science Communication students Shahana Gaur, Lisa Jones, and Elizabeth Kleisath. This video was created as a culminating project of Wiebke Finkler's video production workshop.
Nicotine Vaccines with Justin Boudreau at Studio LWL
 
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Justin Boudreau is hoping to develop a new tool that would help people quit smoking. To do that, he’s trying to find out how to slay the addictive power of nicotine. He believes it’s possible to develop a vaccine that will stop nicotine in its tracks and prevent it from ever getting into the brain. On a yearly basis, it’s estimated that the associated diseases related to smoking cost Ontario’s health care system about 1.93 billion dollars annually. A vaccine to destroy the addictive power of nicotine could go a long way to keeping Ontarian’s healthy. Special thanks to Ruth Reid for conducting the interview and former Science Communication student Colin Stringer for producing the video. Eagle Awards winner for Best Radio Interview, Justin Boudreau.
Biomonitoring Biomass Harvesting
 
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By Jesse Hoag Winner, Best Animation, 2016 Eagle Awards (VLWL) Forest biomass is a renewable resource that has potential as a fossil fuel substitute in energy production. However, sustainable practices must be identified to limit the ecological impacts from intensified biomass harvesting. Soil microinvertebrate communities are integral components of the soil ecosystem and are commonly used as biological indicators of soil quality. DNA barcoding is a modern molecular method that can be used to more efficiently monitor changes in these communities and provide information to help identify sustainable harvesting practices.
Nerve Growth Factor with Kristen Sheffield at Studio LWL
 
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Kristen Sheffield is studying some very small molecules to see what role they may play in alleviating inflammation and chronic pain in our bodies. These small molecules have a big effect on something called NGF---neurotropic growth factor. These same molecules may also have a role in helping to give us some protection from degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinsons. Kristen says not a lot of research has been done in this area, so there are hopes it could be an exciting new frontier in pain prevention. Special thanks to Ruth Reid for conducting the interview and former Science Communication student Colin Stringer for producing the video.
Growing with Metals - Tufted Hairgrass and Bioremediation
 
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Sabrina Rainville explains how studying tufted hairgrass can make bioremediation processes less tough. This video was produced and edited by Science Communication student Erica Richard. Eagle Awards Winner for best director, Erica Reid. Music: Never Forget by Kevin Macleod @ http://incompetech.com/ Usage rights for additional footage obtained from: http://www.pond5.com/
Ring of Fire Biomonitoring
 
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By Vanessa Bourne Winner, Best Cinematography, 2016 Eagle Awards (VLWL) Freshwater is a resource that is essential to the functioning of our ecosystems, and monitoring the effects we are having on freshwater systems is critical to the survival of many organisms. The Ring of Fire - one of the most promising mineral development opportunities in Ontario in over a century - is situated in the Hudson Bay Lowlands, an area that supports a thriving ecosystem and the third largest wetland in the world. Mining developments have the potential to introduce many stressors that could impact these rivers and streams. In order to monitor the environmental impacts of future mining on this near pristine area, Vanessa Bourne's graduate research is helping to determine the baseline environmental conditions as part of the Ring of Fire Biomonitoring Project.
Kerry Perrault's Research on P. Multicolor Fish
 
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Kerry Perrault, a Graduate Student at Laurentian University, is studying how stress affects the reproductive health of Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae fish. This audio story was produced by Science Communication Students: Callum Cymbalski and Derek Chung.
REEL Science - Oxygen: the other silent killer
 
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Alex, a M. Sc. Biology student at Laurentian University, explores the little known effects of oxygen. Inspired by Nick Lane's "Oxygen". Produced by REEL Science, Science Communication class of 2011. Stephanie Morgan Jalyn Neysmith Vanessa Paolin Brittney Sandul Susie Taylor Logo by : Tom Beltrame Special Thanks to : Laurentian University Science North Dr. Dave Pearson Chantal Barriault The Wellness Shoppe
Elize Marcotte: The Mystery of Senescence
 
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Laurentian University Master's Student, Elize Marcotte, is from South Africa. Her passion for biology has brought her to Sudbury, where she is working on mysterious plant species that are killing off their roots, for no apparent reason. Science Communication Students, Anthony Morgan and Kate Henbest, produced this video.
The Things of Nature with Galen Guo: Plight of the Peatland
 
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This video highlights Biology Student Galen Guo's Master's project: microbial community characterization of peatlands subjected to nitrogen deposition. It was produced by Science Communication Students, Derek Chung and Callum Cymbalski.
Massassauga Mitigation
 
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Master's Student Michael Colley studies the Eastern Massassauga Rattlesnake; he is investigating if the mitigation in Killbear Provincial Park is effective. Science Communication Students, Jillian Leonard and Colin Stringer, worked with Mike to produce this video.
BioFilms - New World Diseases
 
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Ashley Stasko, a M.Sc. Biology student at Laurentian University, discusses the unique situation of the New World and the pathogens that evolved there. Produced by BioFilms, Science Communication class of 2011. Lorraine Gouin Linda Henneberg Alex Kerr Karen Lee Nina Nesseth Special Thanks to : Laurentian University Science North Dr. Dave Pearson Chantal Barriault John Gunn
A Day In The Life Of A Science Communication Student
 
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We're busy putting theory into practice this semester! Keep an eye on our blog to find updates about our event, exhibits, videos and internships! www.sciencecommunication.ca Music by Symphony Of Science
Invisible Worlds
 
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M.Sc. Biology Student, Ryan Burke, discusses the invisible world of electromagnetic fields. What could be the consequences of being bathed continuously in an electromagnetic environment? This video was produced by Anik Brazeau and Nicole Berreth, Science Communication Students.
Canada's Next Antibacterial
 
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It’s a showdown! MSc. candidate Alexis Fong is trying to find the perfect antibacterial. Various compounds must go through multiple challenges to test their endurance, strength and compatibility. Who will come out on top? Watch to find out! Alexis Fong is a Biology Master’s candidate at Laurentian University. Her research involved identifying an optimal antibacterial from a group of 312 compounds. Currently, Alexis focuses on determining the mechanism of action and the toxicity levels of the compound Raja_42 as an antibacterial. With increasing antibiotic resistance, the discovery and classification of new antibacterials is an important step in continued treatment of infection on a worldwide scale. Produced by Kiki Kirkpatrick, Laurentian University Science Communication class of 2016. Winner, Best Screenplay, 2016 Eagle Awards (SCOM)
The Story of the Dinos
 
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A Design Theory Midterm Project in SCOM 5056 course. Objective is to take a Science Artifact given in one medium and change it into another medium. For this project in particular, we took an article on the whacky and interesting facts about dinosaurs and turned it into a rap. You can find the article, written by the telegraph, here http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/dinosaurs/8290078/Dinosaurs-whacky-and-interesting-facts-about-ancient-reptiles.html . Produced by Science Communication students: Nicole Berreth and Anik Brazeau
Science with Super Novo: A Journey to the Benthic Layer
 
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Graduate Students Nicole Novodvorsky (Biology), Callum Cymbalski & Derek Chung (Science Communication) collaborated on this video production.
Sudbury Story: Kera's Chapter
 
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Cagdas Kera Yucel is a M.Sc. Biology student at Laurentian University researching the metal contamination of wetlands and wetland plants in Greater Sudbury. Science Communication students, Ashley Miller, Michelle DiCintio and McKenna Elsasser produced this short video about her research.
Biology's not Always Easy
 
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Ariel Porty, an MSc student in biology, studies the transmission pathway of Coxiella burnetti, a bacteria that infects humans via transfer from animals. The primary source of human infection is dairy goats. This video was produced by Science Communication Students, Maxine Myre and Cassandra Elliott.
Painless/Painful (Pinch Yourself)
 
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Allison Kennedy, a Graduate Student at Laurentian University, is researching how small molecules that bind to nerve growth factor, could have enormous potential in treating pain. This video was produced by Science Communication Students Nicole Berreth and Anik Brazeau.
#WomenInStem
 
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This video features Laurentian University student Nathalie Tremblay and Dr. Nadia Mykytczuk. It was produced by Science Communication students Sophie Lamoureux and Brigid Prouse as a culminating project of Wiebke Finkler's video production workshop.
Be Wild! Bacteria Can Be Good
 
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Biology Master's student, Elliott Schmidt, is sampling the stomach bacteria of wild field mice to learn how the places we grow up may strengthen or weaken our immune systems. Produced by Jessica Shapiro, Laurentian University Science Communication Class of 2016. Winner, Best Cinematography, 2016 Eagle Awards (SCOM) Winner, Best Editing, 2016 Eagle Awards (SCOM)
Angiogenesis - Paving our Circulatory Highways
 
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Biology Graduate Student, Abby Callahan, studies angiogenesis, the process through which the human body sprouts new branches from its circulatory highway. This video was produced by Science Communication Students, Colin Stringer and Jillian Leonard.
Wishin' I was Dishin'
 
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By Matthew Heerschap
Vr23 - Searching for the B(r)est Companion
 
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Master's Biology Candidate John Kosiw investigates how a novel chemotherapy treatment, VR23, could tackle the issue of drug resistance and improve the long term prognosis for patients diagnosed with breast cancer. Produced by Jordan Nicksy, Laurentian University Science Communication class of 2016.
Science and Wine!
 
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Billy Mekers presents a taste of his research into the possible relationship between Multiple sclerosis and Earth's magnetic field. This video was produced and edited by Science Communication student Jenny Kliever. Eagle Awards Winner for best male actor, Billy Mekers. Music: Danse Macabre - Violin Hook by Kevin Macleod @ http://incompetech.com/ Marty Gots a Plan by Kevin Macleod @ http://incompetech.com/ Pamgaea by Kevin Macleod @ http://incompetech.com/ Additional Footage: -"Working as a doctor at the Townsville Hospital" by HealthierQueensland, under Creative Commons Attribution license. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKplZzEPPlY -"Earth in 3D [IGEO TV]" by IgeoNews, under Creative Commons Attribution license. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hrf-BB6cipM
Behind the Science with Megan Ross
 
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Megan Ross, a graduate student at Laurentian University is in the process of determining alternative therapies for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis: affecting women worldwide. Bacterial Vaginosis causes both mild and uncomfortable symptoms, but can also lead to serious health outcomes. Winner, Best Interview, 2016 Eagle Awards Featuring Megan Ross Research, Interview and Introduction by Kaitlin Richard and Kiki Kirkpatrick Filming, Editing by Colin Stringer
Behind the Science with Beverly Baxter
 
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Beverly Baxter is a veterinarian turned Laurentian University molecular biology student who first discovered her passion for this research at her pet clinic. After becoming engrossed in the potential therapeutic uses of melatonin she started a graduate research project at the Advanced Medical Research Institute of Canada (AMRIC) in Sudbury, Ontario where she hopes to apply her research towards understanding how different sleep patterns may impact our own production of melatonin, and how this may impact cancer development. Featuring Beverly Baxter Research by Gabrielle Veilleux and Jenna Friedt Interview by Jenna Friedt Introduction by Gabrielle Veilleux Filming, Editing by Colin Stringer