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Big Think Interview With Sherman Alexie
 
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A conversation with the award-winning author and chronicler of the Native American experience.
Views: 54186 Big Think
Knowledge is Power – building capacities for First Nations control of health services
 
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Dr. Jeff Reading Director of the Centre for Aboriginal Health Research based at the University of Victoria (UVic) Professor in the School of Public Health and Social Policy, Faculty of Human and Social Development, UVic Dr. Reading’s research has brought attention to such critical issues as disease prevention, tobacco use and misuse, healthy living, accessibility to health care, and diabetes among Aboriginal people in Canada. His determination to develop solutions contributed to the creation of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research - Institute of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health in 2000 as part of a movement calling for a national advanced research agenda in the area of Aboriginal health. The outcome of the CIHR-IAPH is to improve the health of Aboriginal Peoples’ living in Canada and work collaboratively to improve indigenous peoples’ health globally.
Views: 1261 Population Data BC
FULL STORY: Failing Canada’s First Nations Children
 
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Canadian kids from isolated communities forced to move away from their families – just to go to school. For more info, please go to www.global16x9.com.
Views: 184464 16x9onglobal
The Saskatoon Police Service - Never the Same Day Twice
 
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The Saskatoon Police Service offers career opportunities that are worth serious consideration. The city has a rapidly growing Aboriginal population and the service must reflect this change. As protectors and peacemakers, the role police play in any community is invaluable. The police service offers careers both on the front lines and in civilian support positions. For more information visit saskatoonpoliceservice.ca. ©2014 Saskatoon Police Service
Views: 12931 SaskatoonPolice
Are the Metis Treaty People?
 
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Dr. Adam Gaudry from the University of Saskatchewan argues that the Manitoba Act should be thought of as a treaty between the Metis Nation and Canada. Part of the 2015-2016 Weweni Indigenous Scholars Speaker Series presented by the Indigenous Affairs Office. From January 6, 2016.
Views: 8645 UWinnipeg
Intergenerational Trauma and Education
 
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Keynote By: Dr. Suzanne Stewart Canada Research Chair and OISE's Special Advisor to the Dean on Aboriginal Education
Views: 4013 OISE UofT
This Is My Story by Henry Basil - TRC March 29, 2014
 
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Free News Sharing and On-Line Art Gallery http://www.ciactivist.org FEATURE: The 2016 Fire and Rain art project that began in early January was inspired by news stories on wildfires that burned throughout Western Canada in 2015. Paintings were displayed outdoors publicly throughout Edmonton and their stories shared on YouTube. I used art from the beginning to defend freedom of expression on the Alberta Legislature grounds when it was verbally banned 3 times by Legislature officials. Some of the YouTubes published shared how the wildfires and flooding that followed affected Albertans, their communities and the environment. I hope my art and the stories shared will inspire us to contemplate the calamities in Alberta of 2016 as a collective and together help each other find ways and better solutions to save our planet and our children's future. Doug Brinkman
Views: 2153 Doug Brinkman
Wilton Little Child
 
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Views: 1223 ulethbridge
Think Indigenous 11 Dr Pam Palmater_March 20 2015
 
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Dr. Pam Palmater, Ryerson University
Views: 2839 Usask
Idle No More: Protest to Change?
 
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Momentum and a movement: Idle No More organizers, supporters and observers discuss the objectives and significance of the movement with Steve Paikin.
National Chief Perry Bellegarde - Canada 2020 Aboriginal Peoples and Economic Development
 
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Canada 2020 Event - Aboriginal Peoples and Economic Development
Bringing them home: separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families
 
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This documentary DVD was produced in 1997 and forms part of the Bringing them home education resource for use in Australian classrooms. For more on the report see: https://bth.humanrights.gov.au/ This resource is based on 'Bringing them home' , the report of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families, and on the history of forcible separation and other policies which have impacted on the lives of Indigenous Australians. This documentary complements a collection of curriculum-linked activities and teaching resources, plus a range of photographs, maps and diagrams, timelines, legal texts and glossaries. The Australian Human Rights Commission invites teachers and students to use this resource to explore, understand and reflect on one of the most difficult chapters of our national history and to engage with some of the key concepts involved in the reconciliation debate in Australia. For the education resource see: https://www.humanrights.gov.au/education/human-rights-school-classroom Warning: This video may contain images / voices of deceased Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons. Video produced by Oziris. © Australian Human Rights Commission
Elder In The Making | Episode 5: A Broken Treaty
 
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What follows from the treaty signing is a genocide in slow motion. Elder Narcisse Blood shares his story growing up in residential school and the person he has become. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Connect with us: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/optiklocal/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/optiklocal
Views: 8560 STORYHIVE
Indigenous Feminisms Power Panel
 
01:12:22
Views: 6246 Usask
Inside Story Americas - Canada's indigenous movement gains momentum
 
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Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Canada's Idle No More movement began as a small social media campaign - armed with little more than a hashtag and a cause. But it has grown into a large indigenous movement, with protests and ceremonial gatherings held almost daily in many of the country's major cities. The movement is spearheaded by Theresa Spence, the leader of the Attawapiskat, a small native band in northern Ontario. Spence is now 22 days into a hunger strike on Ottawa's Victoria Island just across from the Canadian Parliament. At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts
Views: 18501 Al Jazeera English
WE ARE STILL HERE In depth preview Lakota docuementary
 
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An in depth preview of the upcoming documentary WE ARE STILL HERE by Value Creaton Films www.facebook.com/valuecreationfilms about Lakota life in the 21st century. Presented in association with SAVE OUR TRIBAL YOUTH www.saveourtribalyouth.com and Crawford Multi Media www.crawafordmultimedia.com
Views: 31819 Rick Kline
Dismantling the Doctrine of Discovery: The Road to Reconciliation Panel
 
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This panel discussion was held June 1st, 2015 at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission closing events in Ottawa, Canada. The Doctrine of Discovery was used as legal and moral justification for colonial dispossession of sovereign Indigenous Nations. Christian explorers claimed lands for their monarchs who could exploit the land, regardless of the original occupiers. To View Grand Chief Ed John's United Nation paper on the Doctrine of Discovery, visit: http://bit.ly/1LN1gfU For more information on the Doctrine of Discovery, visit:http://bit.ly/1LN1gfU
Views: 2095 CFSCVideo
UNREPENTANT: Canada's Residential Schools Documentary
 
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This award winning documentary reveals Canada's darkest secret - the deliberate extermination of indigenous (Native American) peoples and the theft of their land under the guise of religion. This never before told history as seen through the eyes of this former minister (Kevin Annett) who blew the whistle on his own church, after he learned of thousands of murders in its Indian Residential Schools. GET A DIGITAL DOWNLOAD: http://www.amazon.com/Unrepentant-Annett-Canada-Genocide-Documentary/dp/B00IMQOT7E First-hand testimonies from residential school survivors are interwoven with Kevin Annett's own story of how he faced firing, de-frocking, and the loss of his family, reputation and livelihood as a result of his efforts to help survivors and bring out the truth of the residential schools. Best Director Award at the 2006 New York Independent Film and Video Festival, and Best International Documentary at the 2006 Los Angeles Independent Film Festival LEARN MORE: http://kevinannett.com/ Produced By Louie Lawless, Kevin Annett and Lorie O'Rourke 2006
Views: 197767 Independent_Documentary
The rights of indigenous peoples - James Anaya
 
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James Anaya is a Regents Professor and the James J. Lenoir Professor of Human Rights Law and Policy at the University of Arizona College of Law. An expert in international human rights and issues concerning indigenous groups, Mr. Anaya served as the Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms of Indigenous Peoples for the United Nations.
Uncharted Territory: David Thompson on the Columbia Plateau
 
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View more from our digital library: http://video.ksps.org/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ksps Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/KSPSPublicTV Find the latest programming updates: #WhatsOnKSPS David Thompson is revered as a national hero in Canada, but is less well known to Americans. "Uncharted Territory: David Thompson on the Columbia Plateau" focuses on the years 1807-1812, the time that Thompson spent primarily in the Canadian Rocky Mountains and northwestern United States, and the significant contributions that he made to the history of the American Northwest. KSPS exists to improve the quality of life of each person we reach. KSPS content broadens horizons; engages and connects; enlightens, inspires and educates. KSPS is an international multimedia network providing quality programming.
Views: 415877 KSPS Public TV
Haida Art-Northern Villages Part 2.m4v
 
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In November of 2008, Dr. George MacDonald, Director of the Bill Reid Centre for Northwest Coast Art Studies at SFU and author of "Haida Monumental Art", gave a 3-part lecture series on Haida Villages. 

Dr. MacDonald is a renowned expert on Northwest Coast art and has written a series of books on the subject. The presentations are illustrated with historical photographs from the 1870's and onward and explore the distinctive art of twenty-five Haida villages. 

The final instalment of these lectures, "Northern Villages", has been broken down into 2 parts.
RSC 2012 Governor General Lecture Series: We Are All Treaty People: New Models for a Shared Future
 
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The Royal Society of Canada 2012 Governor General Lecture Series Professor James Miller, FRSC February 9th 2012 - University of Victoria Duration: 38:55
Views: 652 RSC SRC
Understanding the TRC Calls to Action
 
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March 23, 2016 Panel Discussion Re-Visioning Teacher Education: Responding to the TRC Calls-to-Action 2016 University of Manitoba
Wahkohtowin: Cree Natural Law
 
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Discussions by four Cree elders; George Brertton, Fred Campiou, Isaac Chamakese and William Dreaver, give insight into the differences between Canadian law and Cree Natural Law and why Natural Law is needed in contemporary society. Wahkohtowin means "everything is related." It is one of the basic principles of Cree Natural Law passed through language, song, prayer, and storytelling. The elders explain that by following the teachings of Wahkohtowin individuals, communities and societies are healthier.
Views: 31228 BearPaw Legal
Clear Skies - a family violence story
 
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www.lawbc.help/clearskies - a family violence story created for the Legal Services Society (Legal Aid BC)
Views: 3383 iStoryStudio
Implementing the Vision: Chapter 3- Current Health Services
 
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The current picture of First Nations is described, including limitations in decision-making and governance.
Views: 3411 fnhealthcouncil
Implementing the Vision: Chapter 2- A Knowledge Gap
 
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The effects of Residential Schools, and the forces of colonization, are examined in relation to First Nations health
Views: 6136 fnhealthcouncil
Hiding in Plain Sight: Connecting the Masterpiece to the Master - Haida Art
 
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Part of a series of lectures sponsored by the University of Washington's School of Art, Division of Art History and held at the Henry Art Gallery, this lecture examines the artwork of the Haida, an indigenous nation from the archipelago Haida Gwaii, off the coast of British Columbia. Discover the meaning behind raven, beaver and other symbols integrated into Haida sculptures, paintings and costumes to share the history and culture of the Haida people. Learn the likely identity of the mysterious carver who created several acclaimed Haida works, who has only recently been discovered. This production is presented by the Bill Holm Center for the Study of Northwest Coast Art at the Burke Museum at the University of Washington. Robin K. Wright, professor, Art History, School of Art; curator, Burke Museum 03/24/2008
Views: 6004 UW Video
Parable of the Hummingbird: Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas
 
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https://vimeo.com/heartspeakproductions, https://www.facebook.com/HeartspeakProductions/ Featured Presentation at the 2nd International Conference on Restorative Practices: Widening Our Lens, Connecting Our Practice, May 31st - June 5th, 2009, Vancouver, BC. Restorative Practices International in partnership with the Centre for Restorative Justice, SFU. Filmed, edited and posted by Heartspeak Productions, Producer/Director Larry Moore, Videographer/Editor Cathie Douglas Flight of the Hummingbird; A Parable for the Environment - This little book features artwork by internationally renowned artist Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas. His distinct and lively Haida Manga style engages perfectly with this inspirational story that encourages every individual to act on behalf of the worlds limited and precious resources. http://mny.ca/ Athlii Gwaii: The Line at Lyell (46:30 min.) 2003 Part of the Ravens and Eagles: Haida Art series Jeff Bear/Marianne Jones, Ravens and Eagles Productions In the fall of 1985, a small but resolute troupe of Haida elders journeyed by helicopter to Athlii Gwaii (Lyell Island) to join their young counterparts in a stand against clearcutting. Industrial invasion in the remote archipelago had gone too far. Ancient cedar giants and rare spruce trees—lifeblood of Haida art and culture—had been leveled indiscriminately for too long. Buoyed by their courageous Haida elders, protesters united in peaceful resistance. A total of 72 people were arrested, but their tactics garnered global attention and won change: in 1987, the government established the Gwaii Haanas Park Reserve/Haida Heritage Site. http://www.movingimages.ca/catalogue/Art/re_athliigwaii.html
Views: 4581 heartspeak
Understanding Aboriginal Identity
 
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Understanding Aboriginal Identity explores the complex issue of self-identification for Aboriginal people. Today, Aboriginal identity remains inextricably linked with past government legislation and the continued stereotyping of Aboriginal people in the media and Canadian history. From a Metis farm in rural Alberta, to the offices of Canada’s leading scholars, Understanding Aboriginal Identity examines the factors that shape who we are. To order this video please go to www.bearpaweducation.ca/videos
Views: 70519 BearPaw Legal
Is there a traditional perspective of Truth and Reconciliation?
 
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A presentation by Honourable Mr. Justice Murray Sinclair as part of the Indigenous Knowledge Seminar Series offered by Aboriginal Focus Programs, Extended Education, the University of Manitoba, held during an open house held at the University of Manitoba DOWNTOWN: Aboriginal Education Centre. Justice Sinclair is the Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, established as an outcome of the 2006 Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. The University of Manitoba has made a commitment to helping the Commission achieve its objectives http://umanitoba.ca/visionary/human-rights.html. Justice Sinclair has served as Associate Chief Judge of the Provincial Court of Manitoba since 1988 and the Court of Queen's Bench of Manitoba since 2001. Shortly after his appointment as Associate Chief Judge of the Provincial Court of Manitoba in 1988, he was appointed Co-Commissioner, along with Court of Queen's Bench Associate Chief Justice A.C. Hamilton, of Manitoba's Aboriginal Justice Inquiry. That inquiry looked into the treatment of Aboriginal people by the justice system and made more than 300 recommendations for change including the establishment of tribal courts. Justice Sinclair was born and raised on the Old St. Peter's Indian Reserve in the Selkirk area north of Winnipeg. He graduated from the University of Manitoba, Faculty of Law in 1979 and taught as an adjunct professor of Law as well as adjunct professor in the Faculty of Graduate Studies at the University of Manitoba. His Ojibway name is Mizanageezhik (One Who Speaks of Pictures in the Sky). He is a member of the traditional Midewiwin Society.
JSGS Public Lecture~Saskatchewan First Nations and the Province's Resource Future
 
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Presented by Chief Bellegarde, Chief of the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations Saskatchewan is in the middle of an unprecedented resource boom. With oil and gas in the south, potash in central Saskatchewan and uranium in the North, along with promising mineral plays in various locations,Saskatchewan's economy is growing rapidly. First Nations are determined to benefit from the boom, as Treaty Peoples with strong ties to the land and with promises from government that we will benefit from development. With duty to consult and accommodate requirements in place, Saskatchewan First Nations have become national leaders in working out appropriate collaboration and impact and benefit agreements with companies and governments. Much more can be done. More First Nations can be employed on the resource projects. Greater care can be taken to protect our traditional lands and protect our people from harm. There are important business opportunities for First Nations companies that remain to be developed. First Nations will not stand in the way of properly managed development that is based on consultations and agreements with our communities, but nor will First Nations agree to open-ended development strategies that do not return a fair share of the benefits from resource development with the Saskatchewan First Nations.
Views: 1378 jsgspp
Judge Maryka Omatsu, Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada
 
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Simon Fraser University's Centre for Dialogue presents Judge Maryka Omatsu, feature speaker for the Jan 23, 2014 Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada community dialogue. About Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada This full-day dialogue drew upon the knowledge and experiences of affected communities to identify shared principles and approaches to support the reconciliation of injustices in Canadian society. The dialogue hosted 120 community leaders involved in the reconciliation of specific injustices, government officials, decision-makers from major institutions and members of the public. More information: www.sfu.ca/reconciling-injustices. About Judge Maryka Omatsu Maryka Omatsu, a third generation Japanese Canadian, was born in Hamilton, Ontario. She graduated with a M.A. from the U. of T. and an LL.B. from Osgoode Hall Law School. During the following 37 years, Maryka has been a lawyer for 16 years, practised human rights, environmental and criminal law; worked for all levels of Government; taught in Toronto, China and Japan; chaired the Ontario Human Rights Appeals Tribunal and adjudicated for the Ontario Law Society. 21 years ago, Maryka was the first woman of East Asian ancestry to be appointed a judge in Canada. Today, she is semi-retired, judges part time in Toronto, and lives in both Vancouver and Toronto. Maryka was active in the Japanese Canadian community's struggle for redress, as a member of the National Association of Japanese Canadians negotiation team. Her book, Bittersweet Passage documented that history and won several prizes. It was published in Japan in 1994.
Aboriginal Youth & Media Conference at MOA (Part Two)
 
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Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Museum of Anthropology. "Assert, Defend, Take Space: Aboriginal Youth Conference on Identity, Activism and Film" was a day-long conference on issues of concern to Aboriginal youth. Artists from the Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth exhibition were joined by young filmmakers and activists from across Canada. Building off of the screened films, panelists discussed themes of youth identity and politics, the objectification of Indigenous women, and environmentalism and youth activism. "Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth"" is an exhibition that looked at the diverse ways urban Aboriginal youth are asserting their identity and affirming their relationship to both urban spaces and ancestral territories. Unfiltered and unapologetic, over 20 young artists from across Canada, the US, and around the world define what it really means to be an urban Aboriginal youth today. In doing so they challenge centuries of stereotyping and assimilation policies.This exhibit will leave visitors with the understanding that today's urban Aboriginal youth are not only acutely aware of the ongoing impacts of colonization, but are also creatively engaging with decolonizing movements through new media, film, fashion, photography, painting, performance, creative writing and traditional art forms. Artists in the exhibition include Alison Bremner (Tlingit), Deanna Bittern (Ojibwe), Jamie Blankenship-Attig (Nlaka’pamux, Secwepemc, Nez Perce, Muskoday Cree), Kelli Clifton (Tsimshian), Jeneen Frei Njootli (Vuntut Gwitchin), Ippiksaut Friesen (Inuit), Clifton Guthrie (Tsimshian), Cody Lecoy (Okanagan/Esquimalt), Arizona Leger (Fijian, Samoan, Tongan, Maori), Danielle Morsette (Stó:lō /Suquamish), Ellena Neel (Kwakwaka'wakw/Ahousaht), Zach Soakai (Tongan, Samoan), Diamond Point (Musqueam), Crystal Smith de Molina (Git’ga’at), Nola Naera (Maori), Kelsey Sparrow (Musqueam/Anishinabe), Cole Speck (Kwakwaka'wakw), Rose Stiffarm ((Siksika Blackfoot, Chippewa Cree, Tsartlip Saanich, Cowichan, A'aninin, Nakoda, French, & Scottish), Taleetha Tait (Wet’suwet’en), Marja Bål Nango (Sámi, Norway), Harry Brown (Kwakwaka'wakw), Anna McKenzie (Opaskwayak Cree, Manitoba), Sarah Yankoo (Austrian, Scottish, Algonquin, Irish and Romanian), Raymond Caplin (Mi’gmac), Emilio Wawatie (Anishanabe) and the Northern Collection (Toombz/Shane Kelsey [Mohawk], and the Curse/Cory Golder [Mi’maq]). Also included are works from the Urban Native Youth Association, Musqueam youth and the Native Youth Program. The exhibition was curated by Pam Brown (Heiltsuk Nation), Curator, Pacific Northwest, and Curatorial Assistant Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers (Blackfoot, Blood Reserve/Sami, northern Norway).
Professor Robert Miller: The Doctrine of Discovery and Manifest Destiny
 
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Official video archive of presentation by Professor Robert Miller at the Indigenous Peoples Forum on the Doctrine of Discovery March 23, 2012 at the Arizona State Capitol House of Representatives
Views: 16289 Tonatierra
"Shooting Back: New Frontiers in the Indian Image Wars"
 
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Rayna Green, Curator and Director of the American Indian Program, Division of Home and Community Life, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution Co-sponsored by the Native American Program, the Hood Museum of Art, and the Dartmouth Centers Forum. Location: Arthur M. Loew Auditorium
Views: 3421 Dartmouth
Early Spring Medicine Walks with Elder Betty McKenna
 
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These videos were filmed during the spring, summer, and fall of 2009 in a Medicine Wheel near Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada. Elder Betty McKenna is Anishnabe and Métis from Shoal River First Nation, Manitoba. The videos were realized by the First Nations University of Canada under the supervision of Dr. Carrie Bourassa and Dr. Fidji Gendron. The videos show different plants during the growing season, how to recognize them, and how they are used by First Nations and Métis people. Plants collected during these walks are now on display in the Medicine Room at the First Nations University of Canada.
Views: 4565 medicineroom1
Think Indigenous 8 Micheal Linklater_March_19_2015
 
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Micheal Linklater, Program Coordinator for White Buffalo Youth Lodge
Views: 2605 Usask
Think Indigenous 5 Colby Tootoosis_March_19_2015
 
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Colby Tootoosis, Youth Spokesperson, Headman Poundmaker
Views: 2282 Usask
Residential School Survivor Personal Stories
 
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Part 1 of 2 Personal stories by Elder Hazel Squakin
Views: 15639 Aboriginal Education
Mary Ellen Turpel Lafond: Listening to the marginalized to address inequality
 
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Children and youth are among the most vulnerable of society's citizens, with those in government care having a further series of risks. In Canada, our Aboriginal children and youth are among the most at risk. More Aboriginal children are in government care in comparison to other children. Fewer Aboriginal children graduate from high school than their non-Aboriginal counterparts. And, too many Aboriginal children live in poverty, become involved with the youth justice system and suffer from intergenerational impacts of residential schools. Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond's goal is that all young people in British Columbia have the same opportunities for success. Her Big Thinking presentation will examine how Aboriginal children, youth and their families have become marginalized, and look at what can be done to ensure that this population @ the edge is heard and this inequality addressed. Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond is President of the Canadian Council of Child and Youth Advocates, an alliance of provincial advocates from across the country who champion the voice and rights of children. She was appointed B.C.'s first Representative for Children and Youth in November 2006 and has worked as a criminal law judge in youth and adult courts, with an emphasis on developing partnerships to better serve the needs of young people in the justice system, particularly sexually exploited children and youth and those with disabilities.
Views: 1861 IdeasIdees
First Nation's Treaty History in B.C., Canada
 
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This was broadcasted in the 90's and gives us a timeless understanding of the challenges First Nations have faced in Canada. There are some scenes of great radio host and sadly missed Jack Webster (resident on Saltspring), interviewing a First Nations hero Frank Calder.
Views: 12995 saltspringpictures
Colonialism and Indian Residential Schools
 
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Part 1 of 3 Central Okanagan School District presents Angela White and the Indian Residential School Survivors' Society as a guest speaker on Canada's Residential Schools. This first video is about the colonial aspect of Residential Schools.
Views: 12317 Aboriginal Education
Aboriginal Education
 
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Education has long been heralded as the key to economic improvement. Leading economist Don Drummond has studied the economic inequality of Canada's First Nations and concluded that every effort must be taken to lead young people to post-secondary education. What barriers make a university or college education extremely difficult to achieve for First Nations young people?
RIIS from Amnesia
 
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RIIS from Amnesia, is a short documentary on the Regina Indian Industrial School (RIIS), its descendants and legacy. Run by the Presbyterian Church of Canada, the school opened its doors in 1891, drawing students from 43 First Nation communities in the North West Territories. The students came from across all three prairie provinces, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, to the school located on the outskirts of Regina, Saskatchewan. Produced for RIIS Media Project, funded by The United Church of Canada
Views: 3241 RIIS Media Project
The River of Healing
 
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On December 4, 2012, the Union of Ontario Indians HIV/AIDS program will launch a new video called "The River of Healing." The Union of Ontario Indians HIV/AIDS program coordinator Jody Cotter produced the video that focuses on harm reduction in drug use. "We focus on positive solutions such as youth prevention programs and strategies that help educate our people on the prevention of transmittable diseases such as Hepatitis C and HIV through unsafe drug use," says Cotter. "The video emphasizes the positive effects, such as healing, that can be brought about through effective methods of harm reduction. The aim of this video is to reduce the stigma and discrimination associated with drug use in our communities." The video launch is in conjunction with the HIV/AIDS "Little Spirit Moon" conference held December 4-5 in Toronto. Produced by The Union of Ontario Indians HIV/AIDS program in collaboration with Regan Pictures, The River of Healing features the participation of the Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network, the Ontario Aboriginal HIV/ AIDS Strategy, Nurture North, the AIDS Committee of North Bay and Area, and others impacted by HIV/AIDS. Funding for The River of Healing was provided by Health Canada and the Ontario Ministry of Health AIDS Bureau. For more information about the Union of Ontario Indians HIV/AIDS program, visit http://www.anishinabek.ca/hiv-aids.asp
Views: 5500 Anishinabek Nation
Canada Lecture: The Demographic Profile of First Nations in Canada
 
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Canada Lecture: The Demographic Profile of First Nations in Canada with Keith Conn -- Chief Operation Officer, First Nations Statistical Institute (FNSI) March 27, 2012 Bannatyne Campus, University of Manitoba The Canada Lecture is an initiative from the Canadian Race Relations Foundation, Canada's leading agency dedicated to the elimination of racism in the country. This lecture took place with the joined participation of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation, the First Nations Statistical Institute and the University of Manitoba.
Andrea Smith: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide
 
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In this lecture, author, scholar, and activist Andrea Smith of INCITE! Women of Color against Violence discussed sexual violence in American Indian communities and the role of sexual violence in genocide. Smith argues hat sexual violence is an inherent part of the colonial project. She also asserts that sexual violence--as a weapon of both patriarchy and colonialism--must be approached from an anti-colonial perspective. Finally, she shares her thoughts on organizing against sexual violence and argues for a "mass movement" against sexual violence that exists outside of current non-profit structures. Mediamouse.org
Views: 21578 mediamouse
2014 Sol Kanee Lecture - Justice Murray Sinclair
 
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The Arthur V. Mauro Centre for Peace and Justice at St. Paul's College, University of Manitoba, is proud to present the Eleventh Annual Sol Kanee Lecture on International Peace and Justice. This year's guest lecturer was Justice Murray Sinclair, Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (www.trc.ca). Justice Sinclair addressed the question: What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? The lecture took place on Monday, September 29, 2014 at the University of Manitoba. 0:04 Opening Remarks and Welcome: Dr. Sean Byrne, Director, Arthur V. Mauro Centre for Peace and Justice at St. Paul’s College 4:32 Greetings: Dr. Chris Adams, Rector, St. Paul’s College at the University of Manitoba 6:55 Introduction of Justice Murray Sinclair: Dr. Niigaanwewidam Sinclair, Assistant Professor, Native Studies, University of Manitoba 17:20 What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? Justice Murray Sinclair Part 1 46:28 Video presentations – Justice Murray included a series of video interviews with residential school survivors as a part of his lecture 53:30 What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? Justice Murray Sinclair Part 2 1:29:33 Question and Answer Period: Dr. Sean Byrne, Moderator 1:59:12 Acknowledgement Peace and Conflicts Studies students, Ms. Mary Anne Clarke and Ms. Jennifer Ham acknowledge and thank Justice Sinclair 2:01:18 Concluding Remarks: Dr. Sean Byrne For more information on this and other Mauro Centre events, please visit: www.facebook.com/maurocentre www.umanitoba.ca/colleges/st_pauls/mauro_centre/
Views: 1195 MauroCentre
Panel Discussion: Art and Reconciliation | Panel sur l’art et la réconciliation
 
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Learn more here: http://c.nac.ca/1RyKruc | En savoir Plus : http://c.nac.ca/1RyKwhw The recent landmark report by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada on the abuses at residential schools states that art has the extraordinary ability to heal. The National Arts Centre hosted a timely panel discussion on art in the context of reconciliation moderated by Dr. Marie Wilson, Commissioner Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, and featuring panelists Rachael Maza, acclaimed Australian theatre director of Jack Charles V The Crown (presented at the NAC), Joseph Boyden, author of the award-winning novels Three Day Road and The Orenda, and John Estacio, JUNO award nominated composer of I Lost My Talk, a new work inspired by the poem of Mi’kmaw elder Rita Joe. The panel discussion was introduced by The Right Honorable Joe Clark. (This is a livestream archive from January 14th, 2016) Dans le rapport historique de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada qui s’est penchée sur les abus commis dans les pensionnats autochtones, on peut lire que l’art a cette faculté extraordinaire de guérir. Le Centre national des Arts est l’hôte d’un panel où seront justement abordés les arts dans le contexte de la réconciliation. Marie Wilson, Ph.D., commissaire au sein de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, agira comme modératrice de cet événement qui accueillera comme panélistes Rachael Maza, célèbre metteure en scène australienne qui a signé la production de Jack Charles V The Crown présentée au CNA, JosephBoyden, auteur des romans primés Three Day Road et The Orenda, et le compositeur John Estacio, cité pour un prix JUNO, à qui l’on doit I Lost My Talk, une nouvelle œuvre inspirée du poème éponyme de l’aînée mi’kmaq Rita Joe. Le très honorable Joe Clark ouvrira la discussion.
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