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Chordates - CrashCourse Biology #24
 
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Hank introduces us to ourselves by taking us on a journey through the fascinatingly diverse phyla known as chordata. And the next time someone asks you who you are, you can give them the facts: you're a mammalian amniotic tetrapodal sarcopterygian osteichthyen gnathostomal vertebrate cranial chordate. Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD! http://dft.ba/-8css Table of Contents: 1) Chordate Synapomorphies 1:04 2) Cephalachordata 1:20 3) Urochordata 3:16 4) Vertebrata 3:49 a) Myxini 4:30 b) Petromyzontida 4:51 c) Chondrichthyes 5:32 d) Osteichthyes 6:05 5) Biolography 7:29 6) Amphibia 9:02 7) Reptilia 9:47 8) Mammalia 10:57 References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-31eh This video contains the following sounds from Freesound.org: "Moog_woodenBlocks.aiff" by Feenixx biology, crashcourse, crash course, phyla, animal, ancestry, chordates, chordata, evolution, mammal, synapomorphy, lancelet, cephalochordata, spinal chord, notochord, vertebrate, nerve chord, pharyngeal slit, urochordata, backbone, vertebrata, brain, myxini, hagfish, craniate, skull, agnathan, shark, gnathostome, cartilage, bone, skeleton, endoskeleton, osteichthyes, fish, coelacanth, biolography, hendrick goosen, fisherman, tetrapod, fins, limbs, frog, amphibian, amniote, amniotic egg, reptilia, ectotherm, endotherm, heart, bird Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 582849 CrashCourse
Systematic Classification of Life ep15 - Synapsida
 
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The Systematic Classification of Life started as a discussion with creationists on Christian Forums. The discussion convinced one of them of the reality of evolution. She eventually became my wife. My wife, Lilandra proposed a video series on that discussion to help people appreciate the beauty and scientific power of cladistics or common ancestry. The original discussion is the template that is being expanded on with my wife's help. Here is a link to the entire series playlist. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXJ4dsU0oGMLnubJLPuw0dzD0AvAHAotW If you like what I do, please consider becoming a patron. https://www.patreon.com/aronra
Views: 31120 AronRa
Reptilia classification with examples
 
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Views: 5803 ZOOLOGICAL WORLD
Systematic Classification of Life ep 8 - Vertebrata
 
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Now in the mid to late Cambrian, we see a greater proliferation of fossils allowing much more diversity to explore and compare as we move through our ancestral clades of Olfactores, Craniates, and Vertebrates. Here is a link to the entire series playlist. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXJ4dsU0oGMLnubJLPuw0dzD0AvAHAotW If you like what I do, please consider becoming a patron: https://www.patreon.com/aronra
Views: 36381 AronRa
Systematic Classification of Life ep13 - Reptiliomorpha
 
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Here is a link to the entire series playlist. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXJ4dsU0oGMLnubJLPuw0dzD0AvAHAotW If you like what I do, please consider becoming a patron. https://www.patreon.com/aronra If you want the shirt I'm wearing.... https://shop.spreadshirt.com/smartapparel/intelligence+stephen+hawking+t+shirt-A17450792 The Systematic Classification of Life started as a discussion with creationists on Christian Forums. The discussion convinced one of them of the reality of evolution. She eventually became my wife. She then proposed a video series repeating that discussion to help people appreciate the beauty and scientific power of cladistics or common ancestry. The original discussion is the template that is being expanded on with my wife's help.
Views: 27457 AronRa
Systematic Classification of Life ep9 - Gnathostomata
 
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This episode begins with the emergence of vertebrates at the end of the Cambrian, and covers the entire Ordovician period to show the evolution of jaws by the beginning of the SIlurian. Here is a link to the entire series playlist. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXJ4dsU0oGMLnubJLPuw0dzD0AvAHAotW Here are some links to follow on Palaeos. http://palaeos.com/vertebrates/vertebrata/index.html http://palaeos.com/vertebrates/pteraspidomorphi/pteraspidomorphi.html If you like what I do, please consider becoming a patron: https://www.patreon.com/aronra
Views: 34907 AronRa
Systematic Classification of Life ep10 - Osteichthyes
 
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Recapping the Ordovician, and moving on to the Silurian and Devonian. Here is a link to the entire series playlist. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXJ4dsU0oGMLnubJLPuw0dzD0AvAHAotW If you like what I do, please consider becoming a patron: https://www.patreon.com/aronra
Views: 33238 AronRa
General Embryology - Detailed Animation On Second Week Of Development
 
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Animation is derived from Primal Anatomy & Physiology Online Course. You may purchase the course at http://primalonlinelearning.com/ Implantation of the blastocyst usually occurs 6-8 days after fertilization. By day 8, the blastocyst has burrowed into the uterine wall, being completely embedded by day 9. Day 8 The blastocyst is composed of two main components: the outer cell mass, the trophoblast; and the inner cell mass, the embryoblast. As the trophoblast makes contact with the endometrium, it differentiates into two layers: an inner, cytotrophoblast; and an outer, syncytiotrophoblast. The embryoblast differentiates into a bilaminar embryonic disc composed of two cell layers, the hypoblast, and the epiblast. Soon after the embryonic disc has formed, a cavity begins to appear between the epiblast and cytotrophoblast, known as the amniotic cavity. Cells originating from the hypoblast begin to migrate, forming a thin membrane, which lines the inner surface of the cytotrophoblast. This is called the exocoelomic membrane. The exocoelomic membrane and cells of the hypoblast together form the walls of the primitive yolk sac. Day 9 Once the blastocyst is completely embedded in the uterus wall, a plug called a fibrin coagulum forms in the gap created in the epithelium of the uterus by the blastocyst. At this time, the growth of the cytotrophoblast and syncytiotrophoblast is much faster than that of the bilaminar embryonic disc Small holes called lacunae begin to form in the syncytiotrophoblast as it continues to expand. Day 12 Capillaries in the endometrium surrounding the developing embryo dilate, forming maternal sinusoids. As the lacunae continue to expand, enzymes within the syncytiotrophoblast begin to erode the lining of the sinusoids and uterine glands. This allows anastomosis between the maternal sinusoids and lacunar networks to begin establishment of an uteroplacental circulation. By day 12, the lacunae stop growing and fuse to form large interconnecting spaces, called lacunar networks. A new population of cells appears between the inner surface of the cytotrophoblast and the outer surface of the primitive yolk sac, known as the extraembryonic mesoderm. Large cavities begin to appear in the extraembryonic mesoderm. These gradually fuse to form one single cavity, called an extraembryonic coelom. Day 13 Approximately 13 days after fertilization, a large portion of the exocoelomic cavity is pinched off, forming a smaller cavity, called the secondary yolk sac. A remnant also forms within the exocoelomic cavity, known as an exocoelomic cyst, which is eventually eliminated. By the end of the second week of development, the chorionic cavity enlarges, and the bilaminar embryonic disc is joined to the trophoblast by a band of extraembryonic mesoderm called the connecting stalk.
Views: 526848 Embryology
Amniote
 
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Video Software we use: https://amzn.to/2KpdCQF Ad-free videos. You can support us by purchasing something through our Amazon-Url, thanks :) Amniotes are a clade of tetrapod vertebrates comprising the reptiles, birds, and mammals that lay their eggs on land or retain the fertilized egg within the mother.They are distinguished from the anamniotes , which typically lay their eggs in water.Older sources, particularly prior to the 20th century, may refer to amniotes as "higher vertebrates" and anamniotes as "lower vertebrates", based on the discredited idea of the Great Chain of Being.Amniotes are tetrapods that are characterised by having an egg equipped with an amnios, an adaptation to lay eggs on land rather than in water as the anamniotes typically do. ---Image-Copyright-and-Permission--- About the author(s): Horst Frank (“original” file); SVG version by -xfi-; counterclockwise rotation by 90°: Domsau2 License: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 (CC-BY-SA-3.0) Author(s): -xfi- Domsau2 (https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=User:Domsau2&action=edit&redlink=1) ---Image-Copyright-and-Permission--- This channel is dedicated to make Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available to people with limited vision. Article available under a Creative Commons license Image source in video
Views: 1055 WikiWikiup
Vertebrates 7- Amniotic egg
 
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Part 7 in an 8 part lecture on VERTEBRATES in a flipped General Biology course taught by Wendy Riggs. CC-BY. Watch the whole lecture (all 8 videos) by going to the PLAYLIST: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5GRRRmaGVqWXe-yWw7VzNe7uRFpqhRsq
Views: 1690 Wendy Riggs
The game-changing amniotic egg - April Tucker
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-game-changing-amniotic-egg-april-tucker 350 million years ago, eggs could not survive far from water, therefore animals were water-bound. That is, until the amniotic egg, which allowed animals to live a fully terrestrial life. April Tucker peels back each layer of the amniotic egg, revealing how truly extraordinary this evolutionary marvel is. Lesson by April Tucker, animation by Pew36 Animation Studios.
Views: 152645 TED-Ed
Best Documentaries || The Evolution of Mammals Part 1 : Meet the Synapsids
 
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Best Documentaries || The Evolution of Mammals Part 1 : Meet the Synapsids The evolution of mammals has passed through many stages since the first appearance of their synapsid ancestors in the late Carboniferous period,the two Synapsid Sub groups that led to mammals are Sphenacodonts and Therapsids.The most ancestral forms in the class Mammalia are the egg-laying mammals in the subclass Prototheria. By the mid-Triassic, there were many synapsid species that looked like mammals. The lineage leading to today's mammals split up in the Jurassic; synapsids from this period include Dryolestes, more closely related to extant placentals and marsupials than to monotremes, as well as Ambondro, more closely related to monotremes. Later on, the eutherian and metatherian lineages separated; the metatherians are the animals more closely related to the marsupials, while the eutherians are those more closely related to the placentals. Since Juramaia, the earliest known eutherian, lived 160 million years ago in the Jurassic, this divergence must have occurred in the same period.
Views: 1053 Best Documentary 2016
Anapsid - Video Learning - WizScience.com
 
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An "anapsid" is an amniote whose skull does not have openings near the temples. Traditionally, the Anapsida are the most primitive subclass of reptiles, the ancestral stock from which Synapsida and Diapsida evolved, making anapsids paraphyletic. It is however doubtful whether all anapsids lack temporal fenestra as a primitive trait, or whether all the groups traditionally seen as anapsids truly lacked fenestra. While "anapsid reptiles" or "anapsida" were traditionally spoken of as if they were a monophyletic group, it has been suggested that several groups of reptiles that had anapsid skulls may be only distantly related. Scientists still debate the exact relationship between the basal reptiles that first appeared in the late Carboniferous, the various Permian reptiles that had anapsid skulls, and the Testudines . However, it was later suggested that the anapsid-like turtle skull may be due to reversion rather than to anapsid descent. The majority of modern paleontologists believe that the Testudines are descended from diapsid reptiles that lost their temporal fenestrae. More recent morphological phylogenetic studies with this in mind placed turtles firmly within diapsids, some place turtles as a sister group to extant archosaurs or, more commonly within Lepidosauromorpha. All molecular studies have strongly upheld the placement of turtles within diapsids; some place turtles within Archosauria, or, more commonly, as a sister group to extant archosaurs. However, one of the most recent molecular studies, published in 23 February 2012, suggests that turtles are lepidosauromorph diapsids, most closely related to the lepidosaurs . Wiz Science™ is "the" learning channel for children and all ages. SUBSCRIBE TODAY Disclaimer: This video is for your information only. The author or publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of the content presented in this video. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Background Music: "The Place Inside" by Silent Partner (royalty-free) from YouTube Audio Library. This video uses material/images from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anapsid, which is released under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . This video is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . To reuse/adapt the content in your own work, you must comply with the license terms.
Views: 1725 Wiz Science™
Systematic Classification of Life - ep23 Mammaliformes
 
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Here is the link to the full playlist: https://goo.gl/K2F5Ss My wife, Lilandra asked me to do this series, based on our first interaction--back when she was a creationist. I often say that phylogenetic taxonomy is the strongest argument for evolution. After we talked about a couple dozen clades, she was convinced, and suggested I do something similar for the public. If you like what I do, please consider becoming a patron. https://www.patreon.com/aronra
Views: 27995 AronRa
Characteristics Of Reptilia And Aves
 
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Characteristics Of Reptilia And Aves- This lesson explicates you about Reptilia and Aves. A brief description on amniotes has been provided. Discussion about amnion, chorion, and allantois membranes can be found in this lesson. Further Iftekhar Khan enlightens about reptiles, their characteristics in terms of habitat, exoskeleton, respiration and other such vital things which you should know. He also mentions about the fertilization, type of egg which lay. Further, he gives comprehensive info about the Aves. The body organization of Aves (bird) has been explained. He has also Illustrated how they are warm-blooded animals, and spoken about all which is vital for you to learn.Animals are classified in a variety of ways. This helps scientists to study the relationships in animal groups and to see the whole animal family tree as it has developed through time. The study of animal classification is called taxonomy. The basic unit of an animal is the cell. To watch this entire collection of lessons and to discuss with the educators go to :https://goo.gl/52WAw9 - For more educational lessons by top educators visit http://unacademy.in
Views: 988 Unacademy Medical
Vertebrates
 
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An overview of vertebrate evolution. Table of Contents: 00:32 - Objectives 00:48 - Vertebrates 01:09 - Chordate Characteristics 02:55 - Lancelets and Tunicates 03:09 - Craniate Characteristics 04:11 - Hagfish 04:24 - Vertebrate Characteristics 04:58 - Lamprey 05:19 - Gnathostome Characteristics 06:16 - Chondricthyans 06:41 - Ray and Lobe-Finned Fishes 07:43 - Tetrapod Characteristics 08:34 - Amphibians 09:19 - Amniote Characteristics 09:56 - Reptiles and Birds 10:28 - Mammal Characteristics 11:06 - Primate Characteristics 11:29 - Human Characteristics
Views: 2894 Vance Kite
Dinosaur Ancestors
 
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An overview of the dinosaur ancestors. If you watched RJ Downard and my talk with Answers in Genesis creationist Mike Riddle, then you’ll remember that he claimed there were no dinosaur ancestors: https://youtu.be/vki8B-W1ch4. All pictures are from Google. “The amniote temporal roof and the diapsid origin of the turtle skull”: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0944200616300241 “The diapsid origin of turtles”: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0944200616300046 “Evolutionary origin of the turtle skull”: https://www.nature.com/articles/nature14900 “Fossils reveal the complex evolutionary history of the mammalian regionalized spine”: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/361/6408/1249 “Early Mammal Evolution”: https://youtu.be/wy90_twSQgU “A new Early Permian reptile and its significance in early diapsid evolution”: http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/278/1725/3731 “Captorhinus”: http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/c/captorhinus.html “Petrolacosaurus”: http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/p/petrolacosaurus.html “A tiny Triassic saurian from Connecticut and the early evolution of the diapsid feeding apparatus”: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-03508-1 “The early evolution of archosaurs: relationships and the origin of major clades”: http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/dspace/bitstream/2246/6112/1/B352.pdf “Stasis”: https://youtu.be/MjvkaM-CaPQ “The earliest bird-line archosaurs and the assembly of the dinosaur body plan”: https://www.nature.com/articles/nature22037 “An evaluation of the phylogenetic relationships of the pterosaurs among archosauromorph reptiles”: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1017/S1477201907002064 “How the pterosaur got its wings”: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/brv.12150 “Evolution of the Pterosaur Pelvis”: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/279773260_Evolution_of_the_Pterosaur_Pelvis “Tupandactylus”: http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/t/tupandactylus.html “Footprints pull origin and diversification of dinosaur stem lineage deep into Early Triassic”: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3049033/ “The origins of Dinosauria: much ado about nothing”: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/pala.12108 “Dinosauria: Morphology”: http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/diapsids/dinomm.html “Marasuchus”: http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/m/marasuchus.html “Silesaurus”: http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/s/silesaurus.html “Eucoelophysis”: http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/e/eucoelophysis.html “A large-bodied silesaurid from the Lifua Member of the Manda beds (Middle Triassic) of Tanzania and its implications for body-size evolution in Dinosauromorpha”: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1342937X14000100 “Asilisaurus”: http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/a/asilisaurus.html “A new hypothesis of dinosaur relationships and early dinosaur evolution”: https://www.nature.com/articles/nature21700 “Eoraptor”: http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/e/eoraptor.html “Herrerasaurus”: http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/h/herrerasaurus.html “Buriolestes”: https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/zoolinnean/zly009/4996397 "A Unique Late Triassic Dinosauromorph Assemblage Reveals Dinosaur Ancestral Anatomy and Diet" https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(16)31124-1 Andrea CAU - The assembly of the avian body plan: a 160-million-year long process http://paleoitalia.org/media/u/archives/01_Cau_2018_BSPI_571.pdf
Views: 1242 Jackson Wheat
PL2: FOSSIL REPTILES: ANAPSIDS, DIAPSIDS, SYNAPSIDS
 
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FOSSIL REPTILES: ANAPSIDS, DIAPSIDS, SYNAPSIDS
Views: 3355 Walter Jahn
The Process of Gastrulation
 
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This video shows the process of Gastrulation, in which the bilaminar embryonic disc undergoes reorganisation to form three primary germ layers. This is just one of the animations from our Anatomy & Physiology Online platform. To discover the platform take a free 24 hour trial http://ow.ly/Tr7Gt or for more information contact [email protected]
Lecture 27 The Reptile Skull
 
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In this lecture I will teach you how to Identify and label the bones of the typical amniote skull, or early reptile skull. You can order the textbook we use for the class here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1118406842/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1118406842&linkCode=as2&tag=benjaminburge-20&linkId=03f99fcb444d3de520702fe5173f9b24 For further information about the instructor: http://www.benjamin-burger.org To learn more about the geology department at USU: http://geology.usu.edu To learn more about the Uintah Basin campus of USU: http://uintahbasin.usu.edu
Views: 3949 Benjamin Burger
Mammals
 
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Check us out at http://www.tutorvista.com/content/biology/biology-iii/animal-morphology/rat-mammal.php What are Mammals? Mammals (formally Mammalia) are a class of vertebrate, air-breathing animals whose females are characterized by the possession of mammary glands while both males and females are characterized by sweat glands, hair and/or fur, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex region in the brain. Mammals are divided into three main infraclass taxa depending how they are born. These taxa are: monotremes, marsupials and placentals. Except for the five species of monotremes (which lay eggs), all mammal species give birth to live young. Most mammals also possess specialized teeth, and the largest group of mammals, the placentals, use a placenta during gestation. The mammalian brain regulates endothermic and circulatory systems, including a four-chambered heart. There are approximately 5,400 species of mammals, distributed in about 1,200 genera, 153 families, and 29 orders(though this varies by classification scheme). Mammals range in size from the 3040 millimeter (1- to 1.5-inch) Bumblebee Bat to the 33-meter (108-foot) Blue Whale. Mammals are divided into two subclasses: the Prototheria, which includes the oviparous monotremes, and the Theria, which includes the placentals and live-bearing marsupials. Most mammals, including the six largest orders, belong to the placental group. The three largest orders, in descending order, are Rodentia (mice, rats, porcupines, beavers, capybaras, and other gnawing mammals), Chiroptera (bats), and Soricomorpha (shrews, moles and solenodons). The next three largest orders include the Carnivora (dogs, cats, weasels, bears, seals, and their relatives), the Cetartiodactyla (including the even-toed hoofed mammals and the whales) and the Primates to which the human species belongs. The relative size of these latter three orders differs according to the classification scheme and definitions used by various authors. Phylogenetically, Mammalia is defined as all descendants of the most recent common ancestor of monotremes (e.g., echidnas and platypuses) and therian mammals (marsupials and placentals).This means that some extinct groups of "mammals" are not members of the crown group Mammalia, even though most of them have all the characteristics that traditionally would have classified them as mammals. These "mammals" are now usually placed in the unranked clade Mammaliaformes. The mammalian line of descent diverged from an amniote line at the end of the Carboniferous period. One line of amniotes would lead to reptiles, while the other would lead to synapsids. According to cladistics, mammals are a sub-group of synapsids. Although they were preceded by many diverse groups of non-mammalian synapsids (sometimes misleadingly referred to as mammal-like reptiles), the first true mammals appeared in the Triassic period. Modern mammalian orders appeared in the Palaeocene and Eocene epochs of the Palaeogene period. Please like our facebook page http://www.facebook.com/tutorvista Follow us at: https://plus.google.com/+tutorvista/
Views: 8543 TutorVista
Snake Documentary DEADLIEST SNAKES LIVING IN AFRICA | National Geographic BBC Wild Documentary 2016
 
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Snake Documentary DEADLIEST SNAKES LIVING IN AFRICA | National Geographic BBC Wild Documentary 2016 Snakes are elongated, legless, carnivorous reptiles of the suborder Serpentes[2] that can be distinguished from legless lizards by their lack of eyelids and external ears. Like all squamates, snakes are ectothermic, amniote vertebrates covered in overlapping scales. Many species of snakes have skulls with several more joints than their lizard ancestors, enabling them to swallow prey much larger than their heads with their highly mobile jaws. To accommodate their narrow bodies, snakes' paired organs (such as kidneys) appear one in front of the other instead of side by side, and most have only one functional lung. Some species retain a pelvic girdle with a pair of vestigial claws on either side of the cloaca. Living snakes are found on every continent except Antarctica, and on most smaller land masses; exceptions include some large islands, such as Ireland, Iceland, Greenland, the Hawaiian archipelago, and the islands of New Zealand, and many small islands of the Atlantic and central Pacific oceans.[3] Additionally, sea snakes are widespread throughout the Indian and Pacific Oceans. More than 20 families are currently recognized, comprising about 520 genera and about 3,600 species.[4][5] They range in size from the tiny, 10.4 cm (4.1 in)-long thread snake[6] to the reticulated python of 6.95 meters (22.8 ft) in length.[7] The fossil species Titanoboa cerrejonensis was 12.8 meters (42 ft) long.[8] Snakes are thought to have evolved from either burrowing or aquatic lizards, perhaps during the Jurassic period, with the earliest known fossils dating to between 143 and 167 Ma ago.[9] The diversity of modern snakes appeared during the Paleocene period (c 66 to 56 Ma ago). The oldest preserved descriptions of snakes can be found in the Brooklyn Papyrus. Subscribe & More Videos: https://goo.gl/HnnsKG Thank for watching, Please Like Share And SUBSCRIBE!!! #snakedocumentary, #wilddocumentary
Views: 568667 Kine Pat
Rise of the Amniotes
 
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Capstone project, as prepared by Rebecca Staab and Lucas Young as a requirement for envs 410.
Views: 356 luke young
Reptilia general characters
 
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Don't forgot to SUBSCRIBE our ZOOLOGICAL WORLD for more trusted and awesome videos. For more videos - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCD__69YQxeAu8woJkTm49iw?view_as=subscriber We post all information about zoology. Zoology involves the study of animals. Not just any study, but how to classify animals, their history, their anatomy and physiology, their development, and so much more. Zoology is a very broad field; zoologists study subjects ranging from single-celled organisms to the behavior of groups of animals. Some zoologists study the biology of a particular animal, others study the structure and function of the bodies of animals. Reptilia, presented as a Class in our classification, includes turtles (Testudines), snakes and lizards (Lepidosauria), crocodiles and their relatives (Crocodilia), and birds (Aves), as well as a number of extinct groups. Reptiles (including birds!) are amniotes; that is, their eggs are protected from dessication and other environmental problems by an extra membrane, the amnion, not found in the first terrestrial vertebrates (amphibians). Mammals (Mammalia) are also amniotes, but they differ from reptiles in the structure of their skulls (especially the regions associated with chewing and hearing). Mammals also have hair and feed their young with milk produced by modified skin glands (mammary glands). In addition to being amniotes, all reptiles have (or did have, in their evolutionary history) horny epidermal scales made of a particular kind of protein, paired limbs with 5 toes, skulls with a single occipital condyle, lungs instead of gills for respiration, and a 3 or 4 chambered heart. Their eggs are covered with a leathery or calcium-based shell (partially or completely lost in some species that give birth to live young), and fertilization occurs inside the female, rather than outside, as it does in most amphibians. Members of Reptilia generally share many additional traits, for example in their nervous and excretory systems, locomotion, and reproduction. Why are birds included within Reptilia, and how are they and other members of this group related to each other? Both the fossil record and comparative analyses of living species (especially those based on molecular evidence) convincingly establish that, among living reptiles, birds and crocodiles are more closely related to each other than they are to lepidosaurs (snakes and lizards). The position of turtles is more controversial; in the past they were thought to represent an early branch of Reptilia. Recent evidence suggests they may have a special relationship with crocodiles and birds. Because birds clearly arise from within the groups we traditionally consider to be reptiles, not separately from them, most systematists now formally consider birds (Aves) to be a subgroup within Reptilia. -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Trophallaxis" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wyivMzqKYo -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 928 ZOOLOGICAL WORLD
When Giant Amphibians Reigned
 
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Try CuriosityStream today: http://curiositystream.com/eons Temnospondyls were a huge group of amphibians that existed for 210 million years. And calling them ‘diverse’ would be putting it mildly. Yet in the end, two major threats would push them to extinction: the always-changing climate and the amniote egg. Thanks to Ceri Thomas for the very cool Temnospondyl reconstructions throughout this episode. Check out more of Ceri's paleoart at http://alphynix.tumblr.com and http://nixillustration.com And thanks as always to Nobumichi Tamura for allowing us to use his wonderful paleoart: http://spinops.blogspot.com/ Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Super special thanks to the following Patreon patrons for helping make Eons possible: Katie Fichtner, Aldo Espinosa Zúñiga, Anthony Callaghan, الخليفي سلطان, Gabriel Cortez, Marcus Lejon, Anel Salas, Robert Arévalo, Robert Hill, Kelby Reid, Todd Dittman, Betsy Radley, Svetlana Pylaeva, Colin Sylvester, Philip Slingerland, John Vanek, Jose Garcia, Noah offitzer, Eric Vonk, Tony Wamsley, Henrik Peteri, Jonathan Wright, Jon Monteiro, James Bording, Brad Nicholls, Miles Chaston, Michael McClellan, Jeff Graham, Maria Humphrey, Nathan Paskett, Connor Jensen, Sapjes, Daisuke Goto, Hubert Rady, Yuntao Zhou, Gregory Kintz, Tyson Cleary, Chandler Bass, Maly Lor, Joao Ascensao. Tsee Lee, Sarah Fritts, Ruben Winter, Ron Harvey Jr, Joshua Mitchell, Johnny Li, Jacob Gerke, Alex Yan If you'd like to support the channel, head over to http://patreon.com/eons and pledge for some cool rewards! Want to follow Eons elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/eonsshow Twitter - https://twitter.com/eonsshow Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/eonsshow/ References: Gaining Ground: The Origin and Evolution of Tetrapods, Second Edition by Jennifer A. Clack. The Rise of Amphibians: 365 Million Years of Evolution by Robert Carroll. Amphibian Evolution: The Life of Early Land Vertebrates by Rainer R. Schoch. Earth Before the Dinosaurs by Sebastian Steyer. How Vertebrates Left the Water by Michel Laurin. The Late Triassic World: Earth in a Time of Transition, edited by Lawrence H. Tanner. The Story of Life in 25 Fossils: Tales of Intrepid Explorers and the Wonders of Evolution by Donald R. Prothero. http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/281/1781/20132689 https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/article/150/4/815/2630857 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/256496340_The_functional_morphology_of_dermal_bone_ornamentation_in_temnospondyl_amphibians “Fishes and Amphibians From the Late Permian Pedra De Fogo Formation of Northern Brazil” by Cox and Barry, 1991. https://www.jstor.org/stable/4524569 “Lower Triassic Temnospondyli of Tasmania” by Cogsgriff, 1974. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1420-9101.2011.02338.x https://www.researchgate.net/publication/281863720_CARBONIFEROUS-PERMIAN_TRANSITION_IN_CANON_DEL_COBRE_NORTHERN_NEW_MEXICO_AN_OVERVIEW https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02724634.2014.912988?journalCode=ujvp20 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1096-3642.2010.00683.x
Views: 532365 PBS Eons
Lecture 23 Early Amphibians of the Paleozoic
 
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In this lecture I will teach you how to identify and distinguish the major groups of early Mississippian and Pennsylvanian tetrapods. These groups of early tetrapods would split into lineages that would go on to evolve into modern amphibians, the Lissamphibia as well as reptiles, birds and mammals, the Amniota. You can order the textbook we use for the class here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1118406842/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1118406842&linkCode=as2&tag=benjaminburge-20&linkId=03f99fcb444d3de520702fe5173f9b24 For further information about the instructor: http://www.benjamin-burger.org To learn more about the geology department at USU: http://geology.usu.edu To learn more about the Uintah Basin campus of USU: http://uintahbasin.usu.edu Image Credits: Gaining Ground: https://www.amazon.com/Gaining-Ground-Second-Evolution-Tetrapods/dp/025335675X/ Panchen, A.L. 1985. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, BiologicalSciences, Vol. 309, No. 1140, pp. 505-568 Wikipedia Carroll, R.L. 1988. Vertebrate Paleontology and Evolution. W.H. Freeman and Company. New York. Other images come from the textbook: Benton, M.J. 2014. Vertebrate Paleontology fourth edition. Published by Wiley Blackwell Publishing. http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118406842.html
Views: 2954 Benjamin Burger
How Birds Get Oxygen Inside Their Eggs
 
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A beautiful tour of the bizarre system that keeps chicks from suffocating before they hatch. ↓↓ Links & Info ↓↓ SUBMIT A QUESTION HERE: http://www.npr.org/skunkbear SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dH6fpR TUMBLR: http://skunkbear.tumblr.com/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/nprskunkbear/ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/NPRskunkbear Credits: Produced by Adam Cole, Ryan Kellman Electron Microscopy: Murry Gans Audio Engineering: Josh Rogosin Senior Editor: Alison Richards Supervising Editor: Nicole Werbeck Chief Science Editor: Andrea Kissack NPR Director of Visuals: Keith Jenkins SFX from Freesound.org users: megashroom bsumusictech sethroph buzbe20 bsumusictech yottasounds martinimeniscus agfx A pfranzen spookymodem yuval misterlockbridge12 waveplay lansere viliguis botha9johann trymyname1 jorickhoofd anagar markgia julien-matthey scheffler the-yura bushi3593 samulis 14fpanskakremenakova
Views: 1646160 NPR's Skunk Bear
Top 4 Deadliest Reptiles On The Earth | HD
 
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Hi Friends! Today we have an exciting topic of discussion, that is top 4 deadliest reptiles on the planet. Reptiles are tetrapod animals in class Reptilia, consisting of snakes, turtles, crocodilians, lizards, etc. This Reptiles or animals are very harmful to human beings which can take life of any innocent. You will be amazed after watching above video. For Best sound effects use of headphones are recommended. Friends Support Our Channel, Subscribe & Share!!! Like Our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/heytopfour Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/heytopfour Follow Us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/heytopfour Add Us on Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+TOP4four -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Top 4 World's Highest Paid Sports Person" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Tig1svZNEw -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 31 Top 4
Valley Of The Snakes: Best Snake Documentary.
 
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Valley Of The Snakes: Best Snake Documentary. Snakes are elongated, legless, carnivorous reptiles of the suborder Serpentes.[2] Like all squamates, snakes are ectothermic, amniote vertebrates covered in overlapping scales. Many species of snakes have skulls with several more joints than their lizard ancestors, enabling them to swallow prey much larger than their heads with their highly mobile jaws. To accommodate their narrow bodies, snakes' paired organs (such as kidneys) appear one in front of the other instead of side by side, and most have only one functional lung. Some species retain a pelvic girdle with a pair of vestigial claws on either side of the cloaca. Lizards have evolved elongate bodies without limbs or with greatly reduced limbs about twenty five times indepenently via convergent evolution, leading to many lineages of legless lizards.[3] Legless lizards resemble snakes, but several common groups of legless lizards have eyelids and external ears, which snakes lack, although this rule is not universal (see Amphisbaenia, Dibamidae, and Pygopodidae). Most species are nonvenomous and those that have venom use it primarily to kill and subdue prey rather than for self-defense. Some possess venom potent enough to cause painful injury or death to humans. Nonvenomous snakes either swallow prey alive or kill by constriction. The snake's heart is encased in a sac, called the pericardium, located at the bifurcation of the bronchi. The heart is able to move around, however, owing to the lack of a diaphragm. This adjustment protects the heart from potential damage when large ingested prey is passed through the esophagus. The spleen is attached to the gall bladder and pancreas and filters the blood. The thymus is located in fatty tissue above the heart and is responsible for the generation of immune cells in the blood. The cardiovascular system of snakes is also unique for the presence of a renal portal system in which the blood from the snake's tail passes through the kidneys before returning to the heart.[54] The vestigial left lung is often small or sometimes even absent, as snakes' tubular bodies require all of their organs to be long and thin.[54] In the majority of species, only one lung is functional. This lung contains a vascularized anterior portion and a posterior portion that does not function in gas exchange.[54] This 'saccular lung' is used for hydrostatic purposes to adjust buoyancy in some aquatic snakes and its function remains unknown in terrestrial species.[54] Many organs that are paired, such as kidneys or reproductive organs, are staggered within the body, with one located ahead of the other.[54] Snakes have no lymph nodes.[54] Venom, like all salivary secretions, is a predigestant that initiates the breakdown of food into soluble compounds, facilitating proper digestion. Even nonvenomous snake bites (like any animal bite) will cause tissue damage.[17]:209 Certain birds, mammals, and other snakes (such as kingsnakes) that prey on venomous snakes have developed resistance and even immunity to certain venoms.[17]:243 Venomous snakes include three families of snakes, and do not constitute a formal classification group used in taxonomy. The colloquial term "poisonous snake" is generally an incorrect label for snakes. A poison is inhaled or ingested, whereas venom produced by snakes is injected into its victim via fangs.[55] There are, however, two exceptions: Rhabdophis sequesters toxins from the toads it eats, then secretes them from nuchal glands to ward off predators, and a small unusual population of garter snakes in the U.S. state of Oregon retains enough toxins in their livers from the newts they eat to be effectively poisonous to small local predators (such as crows and foxes).[56] Snake venoms are complex mixtures of proteins, and are stored in venom glands at the back of the head.[56] In all venomous snakes, these glands open through ducts into grooved or hollow teeth in the upper jaw.[17]:243[55] These proteins can potentially be a mix of neurotoxins (which attack the nervous system), hemotoxins (which attack the circulatory system), cytotoxins, bungarotoxins and many other toxins that affect the body in different ways.[55] Almost all snake venom contains hyaluronidase, an enzyme that ensures rapid diffusion of the venom.[17]:243 Venomous snakes are classified in two taxonomic families: I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (http://www.youtube.com/editor)
Views: 10797 Sreenivas lingala
Lecture 30 Holes in the Skull: Temporal Fenestrae Patterns
 
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In this lecture I will introduce you to the four types of temporal fenestrae patterns in amniote skulls. You can order the textbook we use for the class here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1118406842/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1118406842&linkCode=as2&tag=benjaminburge-20&linkId=03f99fcb444d3de520702fe5173f9b24 For further information about the instructor: http://www.benjamin-burger.org To learn more about the geology department at USU: http://geology.usu.edu To learn more about the Uintah Basin campus of USU: http://uintahbasin.usu.edu Other images come from the textbook: Benton, M.J. 2014. Vertebrate Paleontology fourth edition. Published by Wiley Blackwell Publishing. http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118406842.html
Views: 2747 Benjamin Burger
The 10 Oldest Fossils, and What They Say About Evolution
 
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Wouldn’t it be cool to be able to point at a fossil and know that it’s the first, say, plant? Well... yeah! But it's not that easy! Scientists are always making new discoveries that throw all our old assumptions into question, but we've put together a list of the oldest fossils of their kind that we know of so far! If you liked this video, check out more videos about natural history and paleontology on SciShow's sister channel, Eons: https://www.youtube.com/eons Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Andreas Heydeck, Justin Lentz, Will and Sonja Marple, Benny, Chris Peters, Tim Curwick, Philippe von Bergen, Patrick, Fatima Iqbal, Lucy McGlasson, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Accalia Elementia, Kathy & Tim Philip, charles george, Kevin Bealer, Thomas J., and Patrick D. Ashmore. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: http://www.techinsider.io/oldest-fossils-ever-discovered-2015-10 http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2015/10/scientists-may-have-found-earliest-evidence-life-earth http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/bacteria/cyanofr.html http://www.fossilmuseum.net/Tree_of_Life/Stromatolites.htm http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3478915.stm http://palaeo.gly.bris.ac.uk/palaeofiles/fossilgroups/crustacea/fossils.html http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/cambrian/burgess.html http://burgess-shale.rom.on.ca/en/fossil-gallery/view-species.php?id=32 http://paleobiology.si.edu/burgess/canadaspis.html http://palaeos.com/vertebrates/vertebrata/craniata.html#Haikouichthys http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v520/n7548/full/nature14437.html https://nature.ca/notebooks/english/coalrep.htm http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/h/hylonomus.html https://finstofeet.com/2012/01/05/coming-of-the-amniotes/ http://news.bbc.co.uk/earth/hi/earth_news/newsid_9079000/9079963.stm http://www.livescience.com/15734-oldest-placental-mammal.html http://www.nature.com/news/rival-species-recast-significance-of-first-bird-1.16469 http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v520/n7548/full/nature14438.html http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/o/obruchevichthys.html http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/e/elginerpeton.html http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v373/n6513/abs/373420a0.html http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/01/100106-tetrapod-tracks-oldest-footprints-nature-evolution-walking-land/ http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/news/110901_earlymammals http://www.slate.com/articles/video/video/2013/09/first_face_entelognathus_primordialis_the_fish_that_is_changing_evolutionary.html http://www.nature.com/news/ancient-fish-face-shows-roots-of-modern-jaw-1.13823
Views: 987821 SciShow
What Is AMNIOTE? AMNIOTE Definition & Meaning
 
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What is AMNIOTE, What does AMNIOTE mean, AMNIOTE meaning, AMNIOTE definition, AMNIOTE explanation Amniotes (from Greek ἀμνίον amnion, "membrane surrounding the fetus", earlier "bowl in which the blood of sacrificed animals was caught", from ἀμνός amnos, "lamb"[2]) are a clade of tetrapod vertebrates comprising the reptiles, birds, and mammals. Amniotes lay their eggs on land or retain the fertilized egg within the mother, and are distinguished from the anamniotes (fishes and amphibians), which typically lay their eggs in water. Older sources, particularly prior to the 20th century, may refer to amniotes as "higher vertebrates" and anamniotes as "lower vertebrates", based on the discredited idea of the evolutionary great chain of being. Amniotes are tetrapods (descendants of four-limbed and backboned animals) that are characterised by having an egg equipped with an amnion, an adaptation to lay eggs on land rather than in water as the anamniotes (including frogs) typically do. Amniotes include synapsids (mammals along with their extinct kin) and sauropsids (reptiles and birds), as well as their ancestors, back to amphibians. Amniote embryos, whether laid as eggs or carried by the female, are protected and aided by several extensive membranes. In eutherian mammals (such as humans), these membranes include the amniotic sac that surrounds the fetus. These embryonic membranes and the lack of a larval stage distinguish amniotes from tetrapod amphibians.[3] The first amniotes, referred to as "basal amniotes", resembled small lizards and evolved from the amphibian reptiliomorphs about 312 million years ago,[4] in the Carboniferous geologic period. Their eggs could survive out of the water, allowing amniotes to branch out into drier environments. The eggs could also "breathe" and cope with wastes, allowing the eggs and the amniotes themselves to evolve into larger forms. The amniotic egg represents a critical divergence within the vertebrates, one enabling amniotes to reproduce on dry land—free of the need to return to water for reproduction as required of the amphibians. From this point the amniotes spread around the globe, eventually to become the dominant land vertebrates. Very early in their evolutionary history, basal amniotes diverged into two main lines, the synapsids and the sauropsids, both of which persist into the modern era. The oldest known fossil synapsid is Protoclepsydrops from about 312 million years ago,[4] while the oldest known sauropsid is probably Paleothyris, in the order Captorhinida, from the Middle Pennsylvanian epoch (c. 306–312 million years ago). Source: Wikipedia.org
Views: 160 Audiopedia
Who Are Called Mammals?
 
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Wikipedia wiki mammal url? Q webcache. Animal classes kidzone. Mammals that eat only plants are called herbivores. Who are called mammals? Youtube. Why mammals are called gender politics in eighteenth mammal evolution and classification adw mammalia information. What makes a mammal? The panda's thumb. Mammal wikipediamammals for kids learn about animals and what is a mammal the earth life web. Source the therapsids, members of subclass synapsida (sometimes called mammal like reptiles), generally were unimpressive in relation to other reptiles all mammals share at least three characteristics not found animals 3 middle ear bones, hair, and production milk by modified sweat glands these are invertebrates part phylum arthropoda (arthropods). Mammals are any vertebrates within the class mammalia ( m me li. Humans are mammals australian museum. Many of our species are mammalian hair, made a protein called keratin, serves at least four functions. Why mammals are called gender politics in jstor. Mammals yes, whales are mammals, however due to the fact that they live in ocean these also a number of other animals considered marine mammals feb 28, 2011 why called gender politics eighteenth century natural history. Second oct 12, 2015 all mammals (including humans) have the same distinctive features. Author(s) londa schiebinger. What is a mammal? Encyclopedia of life. The saint louis zoo has more than a hundred mammal species, representing most of the groups on planet. From latin mamma 'breast'), a clade of endothermic amniotes distinguished from reptiles (including birds) by the possession neocortex (a region brain), hair, three middle ear bones and mammary glands carnivores include lions, tigers, seals, largest carnivore mammal which is polar bear. Googleusercontent search. As we have already seen, to be classified as a mammal you need posses all 5 characteristics listed above. In 1758, in the tenth edition of his mammals hub page. Classification of mammals enchanted learning. All mammals are oct 16, 2013 i saw a tweet wondering about what makes an animal mammal the egg laying mammals, platypus and echidna called proto theria, unlike other animals, have body hair, 3 middle ear bones (the that females produce in modified sweat glands mammary like whales dolphins breathe air through pair of lungs, they all cetaceans. When it is a baby and has hair on its body, belongs to the mammal class. First, it slows the exchange of heat with environment (insulation). Are whales mammals? Whale facts. What is a mammal? Readyed. Mammals profile national geographic kids. What is a marine mammal? Dolphin trainer. Mammals that eat both meat and plants are called omnivores. Mammal wikipedia mammal wikipedia en. Mammals include humans and all other animals that are warm blooded vertebrates (vertebrates have also called buffalo ''aug 16, 2017. Some herbivores are cows, elephants, and giraffes. This process is called taxonomy. Humans are omnivores an introduction to the form a
Views: 24 Bet 2 Bet
UNIQUE MAMMALS
 
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Mammals are any vertebrates within the class Mammalia, a clade of endothermic amniotes distinguished from reptiles by the possession of a neocortex, hair, three middle ear bones, and mammary glands.
Views: 35 Grazpp edtech
बच्चे इस वीडियो को ना देखे -Types of Snakes  Dance  close up video in  nature and  laying Eggs
 
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Snake Dancers - Snake Mating close up video and laying eggs snakes- सांप संभोग Snakes are elongated, legless, carnivorous reptiles of the suborder Serpentes. Like all squamates, snakes are ectothermic, amniote vertebrates covered in overlapping scales. Many species of snakes have skulls with several more joints than their lizard ancestors, enabling them to swallow prey much larger than their heads with their highly mobile jaws. With more then 3,000 species of snakes in the world there is plenty to learn about them. Even though they all have many unique characteristics about them, there are quite a few similarities. keywords : national geographic,,animals,Wildlife, Animal homes, Wildlife, Wildlife , Natural World, Natural,Natgeo,Nat Geo, wild animals,beautiful wildlife, snakes movies in hindi,snakes changing their skin,most poisonous snake,big snake attack
Views: 1407 worlds video
Snake Park in Hyderabad Nehru Zoological Park | Dangerous Snakes in Hyderabad Nehru Zoological Park
 
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Hyderabad Zoo Park , Nehru Zoological Snake Park is located near Mir Alam Tank in Hyderabad, Telangana State , India. Snake Park is one of the most Popular visited Tourist destination in Hyderabad located in Telangana State. #Snake Park in Hyderabad, #Nehru Zoological Park , Nehru #Zoo Park You can watch many Snakes and lizards in Hyderabad zoo park like Sand Boa,Checkered Keel Back Snake,Reticulated Python, Green Whip Snake,Indian Rock Python, Snake Rat / Dhaman,Indian Chameleon,Russel’s Viper, Indian Cobra, common Krait, King Cobra, Monitor Lizard, Whitakers Boa, Water Monitor Lizard and many more snakes. You can watch many Snakes On A Tree Branch In Nehru Zoological Park. Visit this famous zoo Park in Telangana state to watch Rare snake species in the vicinity of Nehru Zoological Park. snake park Hyderabad telangana, Snake Park in Hyderabad Nehru Zoological Park, snake park in Hyderabad zoo, Hyderabad zoo park, dangerous snakes in Hyderabad zoological park, king cobra in Hyderabad zoo snake park, python in Hyderabad zoological park, Snake at Nehru Zoological Park Hyderabad, Snakes On A Tree Branch In Nehru Zoological Park, Snakes and Vipers in the Nehru Zoological Park Hyderabad, Nehru zoological park snakes, Indian cobra snake in Hyderabad zoo park, snakes in Hyderabad zoological park, Hyderabad zoo, zoo in Hyderabad, snake show in Hyderabad zoo, snake show in Hyderabad zoological park, snake show in Hyderabad zoo park. snakes in Hyderabad , snakes in Hyderabad zoo , dangerous snakes in hyderabad zoo park, snakes in nehru zoo park, snakes in nehru zoological park , snakes in zoo , snakes in india, snakes in hyderabad, snakes in telangana, dangerous snakes in india, dangerous snakes in hyderabad, dangerous snakes in telangana, reptile house , reptile house in hyderabad, rare snakes in hyderabad, Reptiles in Nehru Zoological Park Hyderabad , Reptiles in Nehru Zoological Park, Reptiles in hyderabad zoo , Snakes and Vipers in the Nehru Zoological Park Hyderabad, Snake On A Tree Branch In Nehru Zoological Park , big snakes in zoo, snake zoo near me, different types of snakes in nehru zoo park , cobra snake in nehru zoo park , cobra snake in nehru zoological park hyderabad, cobra snake , python snake in hyderabad zoo park , Snakes are elongated, legless, carnivorous reptiles of the suborder Serpentes. Like all other squamates, snakes are ectothermic, amniote vertebrates covered in overlapping scales. Nehru Zoological Park in Hyderabad is the first zoo in India to come forward to work with Laboratory for Conservation of Endangered Species . The Nehru Zoological Park, Hyderabad was opened to the public in the year 1963 in pursuance of recommendations of Indian Board for Wildlife, Govt. of India.On 6th October, 1963, General S.M. Sri.Nagesh, the then Governor of Andhra Pradesh inaugurated this Zoological Park. Nehru Zoological Park was one of the largest Zoo in india. A rare snake species was found in the vicinity of Nehru Zoological Park. The snake was rescued by the reptile house keepers of the zoo. It was identified as the Yellow Collared Wolf Snake by the zoo veterinary section. The snake was found to be 46 centimetres in length. For commuting inside the Hyderabad Nehru Zoo park, there are battery operated vehicles as well as bicycles. Nehru Zoological Park, Hyderabad was established in vide G.O.Ms. No.247, dated 26 October 1959 and opened to the public on 6 October 1963. The Park is run by forest department, Government of Telangana, and is named after the first Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru. Amazing Videos, Snake videos for kids, snake videos for children, popular tourist places in hyderabad, popular tourist places in telangana state , popular tourist places in india. snakes in india, poisonous snakes in india , non poisonous snakes in india, where do snakes live , how snakes live , snakes in bushes , snakes on trees , snakes in water , rarest snakes in india
Views: 104379 India Tourism News
Are Birds Tetrapods?
 
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The origin of tetrapods understanding evolution. Tetrapods include all living land vertebrates as biodiversity. Tetrapods tetrapoda the animal encyclopedia thoughtcofandom powered by wikiaevolution library tetrapod limbs pbs. Googleusercontent search. Batrachomorphs are all animals sharing a more recent common ancestry with living amphibians than amniotes (reptiles, birds, and mammals) the evolution of tetrapods began about 400 million years ago in devonian period earliest evolved from lobe finned fishes. What are tetrapods? Quora. Certain species of fish are define tetrapod. Tetrapod wikipediaevolution of tetrapods wikipedia. Frogs are, salamanders even snakes are. And the wings of bats and birds it turns out that they develop from an embryonic five digit stage 21 apr 2011 some tetrapods are capable flight (birds bats), while others glide, such as flying squirrels, dermopterans (sometimes called 'flying amniotic egg allowed to become completely terrestrial. Mammals evolved in numerous scientists have sought a homologue of mammalian isocortex sauropsids (reptiles and birds) sauropsid dorsal ventricular ridge 4 oct 2005 the data obtained on amphibians, reptiles, birds mammals reptiles smallest genomes among tetrapods, which you are, lions, tigers, bears are. It goes without saying that bcf has not won acceptance in the 9 aug 2016 tetrapods are a group of vertebrates includes amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Mammals were around long before the first dinosaurs and birds. The telencephalon of tetrapods in evolutiongenome size and metabolic intensity a tale two lines. Bone histology of fossil tetrapods advancing methods, analysis, google books result. Tetrapod wikipedia en. All these animals are tetrapods because they descend from the tetrapod ancestor 10 jun 2009 in previous article we looked at birds come first, or bcf, hypothesis. Tetrapoda includes four classes amphibians, reptiles, mammals and birds. Overall the biodiversity of tetrapods has grown exponentially over time tetrapod tetrapoda a superclass animals that includes all limbed vertebrates classes amphibia (amphibians), reptilia (reptiles), aves (birds), mammalia limbs have same pattern bones. Tetrapods mean 'four feet' or legs. Tetrapods are categorized as a biological superclass, tetrapoda, which includes all living and extinct amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals birds humans tetrapods even though they only walk on two legs. The group so defined is known as the tetrapod total. Birds, and mammals the amniotic egg origins of higher groups tetrapods controversy consensus google books result. Terrestrial vertebrates tree of life web project. The two subclades of crown tetrapods are batrachomorpha and reptiliomorpha. Birds come first oh no they don't! tetrapod zoology. The bare bones an unconventional evolutionary history of the skeleton google books result. Wikipedia wiki tetrapod url? Q webcache. Tetrapod synonyms, tetrapod pronunciation, translation, english tetrapoda includes the amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammalsa few selected transitional fossilsdinosaurs birdsland mammals whalesTetrapod wikipediaevolution of tetrapods wikipedia.
Views: 81 Sea of Question
Jaw-Dropping Animal Yawns - Volume 2
 
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Jaw-Dropping Animal Yawns - Volume 2 Yawning Arctic Foxes - The arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus), also known as the white fox, polar fox, or snow fox, is a small fox native to the Arctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere and is common throughout the Arctic tundra biome.[1][3] It is well adapted to living in cold environments. It has a deep thick fur which is brown in summer and white in winter. It averages in size at about 85.3 cm (33.6 in) in body length, with a generally rounded body shape to minimize the escape of body heat. They prey on any small animals they can find, including lemmings, voles, ringed seal pups, fish, and bird eggs. They will also eat carrion, berries, and seaweed. They form monogamous pairs during the breeding season and usually stay together in family groups of multiple generations in complex underground dens. Source - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic_Foxes Yawning Birds - Birds (class Aves or clade Avialae) are feathered, winged, bipedal, endothermic (warm-blooded), egg-laying, vertebrate animals. With around 10,000 living species, they are the most speciose class of tetrapod vertebrates. All present species belong to the subclass Neornithes, and inhabit ecosystems across the globe, from the Arctic to the Antarctic. Extant birds range in size from the 5 cm (2 in) Bee Hummingbird to the 2.75 m (9 ft) Ostrich. The fossil record indicates that birds emerged within theropod dinosaurs during the Jurassic period, around 150 million years ago. Birds are the only members of the clade originating with the earliest dinosaurs to have survived the Cretaceous--Paleogene extinction event 66 million years ago. Source - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birds Yawning Hippos - Hippos (Ancient Greek Ίππος, "horse") is an archaeological site in Israel, located on a hill overlooking the Sea of Galilee. Between the 3rd century BC and the 7th century AD, Hippos was the site of a Greco-Roman city. Besides the fortified city itself, Hippos controlled two port facilities on the lake and an area of the surrounding countryside. Hippos was part of the Decapolis, or Ten Cities, a region in Roman Nowadays in Jordan, Syria and Israel that were culturally tied more closely to Greece and Rome than to the Semitic ethnoi around. Source - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippos Yawning Lions - The lion (Panthera leo) is one of the four big cats in the genus Panthera and a member of the family Felidae. With some males exceeding 250 kg (550 lb) in weight,[4] it is the second-largest living cat after the tiger. Wild lions currently exist in sub-Saharan Africa and in Asia (where an endangered remnant population resides in Gir Forest National Park in India) while other types of lions have disappeared from North Africa and Southwest Asia in historic times. Until the late Pleistocene, about 10,000 years ago, the lion was the most widespread large land mammal after humans. They were found in most of Africa, across Eurasia from western Europe to India, and in the Americas from the Yukon to Peru. Source - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lions Yawning Snakes - Snakes are elongated, legless, carnivorous reptiles of the suborder Serpentes that can be distinguished from legless lizards by their lack of eyelids and external ears. Like all squamates, snakes are ectothermic, amniote vertebrates covered in overlapping scales. Many species of snakes have skulls with many more joints than their lizard ancestors, enabling them to swallow prey much larger than their heads with their highly mobile jaws. To accommodate their narrow bodies, snakes' paired organs (such as kidneys) appear one in front of the other instead of side by side, and most have only one functional lung. Some species retain a pelvic girdle with a pair of vestigial claws on either side of the cloaca. Source - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snakes Yawning Tasmanian Devils - The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is a carnivorous marsupial of the family Dasyuridae, now found in the wild only on the Australian island state of Tasmania. The size of a small dog, it became the largest carnivorous marsupial in the world following the extinction of the thylacine in 1936. It is characterised by its stocky and muscular build, black fur, pungent odour, extremely loud and disturbing screech, keen sense of smell, and ferocity when feeding. The Tasmanian devil's large head and neck allow it to generate amongst the strongest bite per unit body mass of any extant mammal land predator,[2] and it hunts prey and scavenges carrion as well as eating household products if humans are living nearby. Source - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tasmanian_Devils
Views: 1310 Kaushik Biswas
Anaconda Snake - The Largest Snakes In The World
 
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Views: 124890 AnimalsLife
What is WALLACE LINE? What does WALLACE LINE mean? WALLACE LINE meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is WALLACE LINE? What does WALLACE LINE mean? WALLACE LINE meaning - WALLACE LINE definition - WALLACE LINE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The Wallace Line or Wallace's Line is a faunal boundary line drawn in 1859 by the British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace that separates the ecozones of Asia and Wallacea, a transitional zone between Asia and Australia. West of the line are found organisms related to Asiatic species; to the east, a mixture of species of Asian and Australian origin is present. Wallace noticed this clear division during his travels through the East Indies in the 19th century. The line runs through Indonesia, between Borneo and Sulawesi (Celebes), and through the Lombok Strait between Bali and Lombok. The distance between Bali and Lombok is small, about 35 kilometres (22 mi). The distributions of many bird species observe the line, since many birds do not cross even the smallest stretches of open ocean water. Some bats have distributions that cross the line, but other mammals are generally limited to one side or the other; an exception is the crab-eating macaque. Other groups of plants and animals show differing patterns, but the overall pattern is striking and reasonably consistent. Flora do not follow the Wallace Line to the same extent as fauna. Antonio Pigafetta had recorded the biological contrasts between the Philippines and the Maluku Islands (Spice Islands) (on opposite sides of the line) in 1521 during the continuation of the voyage of Ferdinand Magellan, after Magellan had been killed on Mactan. Moreover, as noted by Wallace himself, the observations in faunal differences between the two regions had already been made earlier by George Windsor Earl. In Earl's pamphlet On the Physical Geography of South-Eastern Asia and Australia, published in 1845, he described how shallow seas connected islands on the west (Sumatra, Java, etc.) with the Asian continent and with similar wildlife, and islands on the east such as New Guinea were connected to Australia and were characterised by the presence of marsupials. Wallace used his extensive travel in the region to propose a line to the east of Bali since "all the islands eastward of Borneo and Java formed part of an Australian or Pacific Continent, from which they were separated." The name 'Wallace's Line' was first used by Thomas Huxley in an 1868 paper to the Zoological Society of London, but showed the line to the west of the Philippines. Wallace's studies in Indonesia demonstrated the emerging theory of evolution, at about the same time as Joseph Dalton Hooker and Asa Gray published essays also supporting Darwin's hypothesis. Understanding of the biogeography of the region centers on the relationship of ancient sea levels to the continental shelves. Wallace's Line is visible geographically when the continental shelf contours are examined; it can be seen as a deep-water channel that marks the southeastern edge of the Sunda Shelf which links Borneo, Bali, Java, and Sumatra underwater to the mainland of southeastern Asia. Australia is likewise connected by the Sahul Shelf to New Guinea. The biogeographic boundary known as Lydekker's Line, which separates the eastern edge of Wallacea from the Australian region, has a similar origin to the Wallace line. During ice age glacial advances, when the ocean levels were up to 120 metres (390 ft) lower, both Asia and Australia were united with what are now islands on their respective continental shelves as continuous land masses, but the deep water between those two large continental shelf areas was, for over 50 million years, a barrier that kept the flora and fauna of Australia separated from those of Asia. Wallacea consists of islands that were not recently connected by dry land to either of the continental land masses, and thus were populated by organisms capable of crossing the straits between islands. "Weber's Line" runs through this transitional area (to the east of centre), at the tipping point between dominance by species of Asian against those of Australian origin. It can reasonably be concluded it was an ocean barrier preventing species migration because the physical aspects of the separated islands are very similar. Species found only on the Asian side include leaf monkeys and ponderous-beaked hornbills while Australian wallabies, spiny anteaters, tree kangaroos and gliding possums are not.
Views: 4061 The Audiopedia
Ep 1: Introduction to the Platypus
 
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Alpine and Lowland Ecology (91163): This episode will define monotremes, highlight the types of monotremes in Australia, discuss the history of monotremes with a focus on the platypus, and then cover basic platypus morphology. Visit our Tumblr blog to learn more about the platypus: uts-tumblr.com Platypus sound link: uts-platypus.tumblr.com/post/154673551315/the-call-of-the-platypus-click-here-to-play By: Peter Tran _________________________ Episode reference list: Archer, M., Flannery, T.F., Ritchie, A. & Molnar, R.E. 1985, ‘First Mesozoic mammal from Australia – an early Cretaceous monotreme’, Nature, vol. 318, pp. 363-366. Animal Fact Guide 2014, Short-Beaked Echidna, viewed 4 January 2017, (http://www.animalfactguide.com/animal-facts/short-beaked-echidna/). Augee, M., Gooden, B. & Musser, A. 2006, Echidna extraordinary egg-laying mammal, CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood. Australian Biological Resources Study 1989, Fauna of Australia – Volume 1B Mammalia, AGPS Canberra, 4 January 2017, (https://www.environment.gov.au/system/files/pages/a117ced5-9a94-4586-afdb-1f333618e1e3/files/16-ind.pdf). Australian Museum 2015, Platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, viewed 4 January 2017, (http://australianmuseum.net.au/platypus). Australian Museum 2009a, Steropodon galmani, viewed 4 January 2017, (http://australianmuseum.net.au/steropodon-galmani). Australian Museum 2009b, Opalised Jaw of Steropodon galmani, viewed 4 January 2017, (http://australianmuseum.net.au/image/opalised-jaw-of-steropodon-galmani). Cao, Y., Waddell, P.J., Westerman, M., Takenaka, O., Murata, S., Okada, N., Paabo, S. & Hasegawa, M. 1998, ‘Conflict among individual mitochondrial proteins in resolving the phylogeny of Eutherian orders’, Journal of Molecular Evolution, vol. 47, pp. 307-322. Grützner, F. & Graves, J.A.M. 2004, ‘A platypus’ eye view of the mammalian genome’, Current Opinion in Genetics & Development, vol. 14, pp. 642-649. Grant, T. 2007, Platypus, CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne. Grützner, F., Deakin, J., Rens, W., El-Mogharbel, N. & Graves, J.A.M. 2003, ‘The monotreme genome: a patchwork of reptile, mammal and unique features?’, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A, vol. 136, pp. 867-881. International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources 2016a, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, viewed 4 January 2017, (http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/40488/0). International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources 2016b, Tachyglossus aculeatus, viewed 4 January 2017, (http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/41312/0). International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources 2016c, Zaglossus bruijnii, viewed 4 January 2017, (http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/23179/0). Kirsch, J.A. & Mayer G.C. 1998, ‘The platypus is not a rodent: DNA hybridization, amniote phylogeny and the palimpsest theory. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 1372, pp. 1221-1237. Musser, A.M. 2003, ‘Review of the monotreme fossil record and comparison of palaeontological and molecular data’, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A, vol. 136, pp. 927-942. Office of Environment and Heritage 2014, Platypus, viewed 4 January 2017, (http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/animals/ThePlatypus.htm). Pascual, R., Archer, M., Jaureguizar, E.O., Prado, J.L., Godthelp, H. & Hand, S.J. 1992, ‘First discovery of monotremes in South America’, Nature, vol. 356, pp. 704-706. Rowe, T., Rich, T.H., Vickers-Rich, P., Springer, M. & Woodburne, M.O. 2008, ‘The oldest platypus and its bearing on divergence timing of the platypus and echidna clades’, PNAS, vol. 105, pp. 1238-1242. Rich, T.H., Vickers-Rich, P., Trusler, P., Flannery, T.F., Cifelli, R., Constantine, A., Kool, L. & Van Klaveren, N. 2001, ‘Monotreme nature of the Austarlian Early Cretaceous mammal Teinolosphos trusleri’, ACTA Palaeontologica Polonica, vol. 46, pp. 113-118. Wildscreen Arkive 2016a, Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), viewed 4 January 2017, (http://www.arkive.org/platypus/ornithorhynchus-anatinus/). Wildscreen Arkive 2016b, Long-Beaked Echidna (Zaglossus spp.), viewed 4 January 2017, (http://www.arkive.org/long-beaked-echidna/zaglossus-spp/). Zoos Victoria 2016, Platypus, viewed 4 January 2017, (http://www.zoo.org.au/healesville/animals/platypus).
Views: 259 simply-ptrn
Chapter 26 Part 1
 
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This screencast will introduce the student to the Amniotes and the class Reptilia.
Views: 273 NMZoology
our reptiles 我們的爬蟲
 
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Reptiles, the class Reptilia, are an evolutionary grade of animals, comprising today's turtles, crocodilians, snakes, lizards, and tuataras, as well as many extinct groups. A reptile is any amniote (tetrapod that can lay eggs on land) that is neither a mammal nor a bird.[1] Unlike mammals, birds, and certain extinct reptiles, living reptiles have scales or scutes (rather than fur or feathers) and are cold-blooded. Advocates of phylogenetic nomenclature regard the traditional category 'Reptilia' to be invalid, as not all descendants of a common ancestor are included. However, in practice, these non-cladistic classifications, such as reptile, fish, and amphibian, remain in use by some biologists, especially in popular books written for a general audience. The earliest known reptiles originated around 340-335 million years ago during the Carboniferous period, having evolved from advanced reptile-like amphibians that became increasingly adapted to life on dry land. Some early examples include the lizard-like Hylonomus, Casineria and possibly Westlothiana, although the latter may be an advanced land-dwelling amphibian. In addition to the living reptiles, there are many diverse groups that are now extinct, in some cases due to mass extinction events. In particular, the K--Pg extinction wiped out the pterosaurs, plesiosaurs, ornithischians, and sauropods, as well as many species of theropods (e.g. tyrannosaurs and dromaeosaurids), crocodyliforms, and squamates (e.g. mosasaurids). Modern reptiles inhabit every continent with the exception of Antarctica. Several living subgroups are recognized: Testudines (turtles, terrapins and tortoises): approximately 400 species[2] Sphenodontia (tuataras from New Zealand): 2 species[2] Squamata (lizards, snakes, and worm lizards): over 9,600 species[2] Crocodilia (crocodiles, gavials, caimans, and alligators): 25 species[2] Although they have scutes on their feet and lay eggs, birds have historically been excluded from the reptiles. They, therefore, do not appear on the list above. However, as some reptiles are more closely related to birds than they are to other reptiles — crocodiles are more closely related to birds than they are to lizards — cladistic writers who prefer a more unified (monophyletic) grouping usually also include the birds, which include over 10,000 species.[3][4][5] (See Sauropsida.) Reptiles are tetrapod vertebrates, either having four limbs or, like snakes, being descended from four-limbed ancestors. Unlike amphibians, reptiles do not have an aquatic larval stage. Most reptiles are oviparous (egg-laying), although several species of squamates are viviparous, as were some extinct aquatic clades[6] — the fetus develops within the mother, contained in a placenta rather than an eggshell. As amniotes, reptile eggs are surrounded by membranes for protection and transport, which adapt them to reproduction on dry land. Many of the viviparous species feed their fetuses through various forms of placenta analogous to those of mammals, with some providing initial care for their hatchlings. Extant reptiles range in size from a tiny gecko, Sphaerodactylus ariasae, which can grow up to 17 mm (0.7 in) to the saltwater crocodile, Crocodylus porosus, which may reach 6 m (19.7 ft) in length and weigh over 1,000 kg (2,200 lb). Traditionally, the reptiles are one of the three classes of amniotes, the others being the mammals and the birds. By the middle of the 20th century, it had become common to split the reptiles into four groups based on their skull openings. However, as reptiles in the traditional sense are the ancestors of both birds and mammals, many taxonomists have recently adopted a phylogenetic nomenclature, preferring to group animals based exclusively on shared ancestry rather than on shared features; this orientation has led some to abandon reptiles as a systematic unit or redefine the reptiles in a manner that includes birds. The historically combined study of reptiles and amphibians is called herpetology.
Views: 170 PakWoAquarium
Mammal - Video Learning - WizScience.com
 
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"Mammals" are any members of a clade of endothermic amniotes distinguished from reptiles and birds by the possession of hair, three middle ear bones, mammary glands, and a neocortex . The mammalian brain regulates body temperature and the circulatory system, including the four-chambered heart. The mammals include the largest animals on the planet, the rorquals and other large whales, as well as some of the most intelligent, such as elephants, some primates, including humans, and some of the cetaceans. The basic body type is a four-legged land-borne animal, but some mammals are adapted for life at sea, in the air, in the trees, or on two legs. The largest group of mammals, the placentals, have a placenta, which enables feeding the fetus during gestation. Mammals range in size from the 30 – bumblebee bat to the 33 m blue whale. The word "mammal" is modern, from the scientific name "Mammalia" coined by Carl Linnaeus in 1758, derived from the Latin "mamma" . All female mammals nurse their young with milk, which is secreted from special glands, the mammary glands. According to "Mammal Species of the World", 5,416 species were known in 2006. These were grouped in 1,229 genera, 153 families and 29 orders. In 2008 the IUCN completed a five-year, 1,700-scientist Global Mammal Assessment for its IUCN Red List, which counted 5,488 accepted species at the end of that period. In some classifications, the mammals are divided into two subclasses not counting fossils: the Prototheria, that is, the order Monotremata; and the Theria, or the infraclasses Metatheria and Eutheria. The marsupials constitute the crown group of the Metatheria, and include all living metatherians as well as many extinct ones; the placentals are the crown group of the Eutheria. Wiz Science™ is "the" learning channel for children and all ages. SUBSCRIBE TODAY Disclaimer: This video is for your information only. The author or publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of the content presented in this video. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Background Music: "The Place Inside" by Silent Partner (royalty-free) from YouTube Audio Library. This video uses material/images from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammal, which is released under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . This video is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . To reuse/adapt the content in your own work, you must comply with the license terms.
Views: 118 Wiz Science™
Do Snakes Have Ears Wikipedia?
 
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Wikipedia wiki legless_lizard) cobaltduck mar 23 at 19 05 not only are snakes deaf, they actually have a proper inner ear the basilisk has classification as an xxxxx creature, meaning it is became petrified well, although he did look beast's eyes directly. Snakes don't have visible ears, and they can't hear in a traditional sense (or as yessnakewikipedia about careersthe evi name, associated trade marks (e. Snakes do not have eyelids or external ears, two features that distinguish them snakes are deaf? A common question, and a good one. And any way, snakes technically, do not hear because they don't have ears. Photo credit fred the oyster wikipedia (gfdl) can often detect where a sound is coming from, thanks to distance between our two ears. Interestingly, snakes do not have external ears or ear drums but they can hear. Many species of snakes have skulls with several more joints than their lizard lack external ears, though they do internal and respond to 7 nov 2012 no visible ear, so don't hear sounds as we. Do snakes have ears evian introduction to biology for everyone google books result. There would be no need to use their tongue the way 'original' snakes do) they have ears. However, snakes lack ears and can only detect things approaching by feeling vibrations many species of have skulls with more joints than their lizard whenever you think must do, he says been bitten the snake 3 nov 2015 reason forked tongues is because they use them to 'smell. What snakes do not have are the external structures of answer wiki originally answered ears? . But it's not quite right to say that snakes are deaf. Specifically, they are deaf to sounds that travel through the air. Like all squamates, snakes are ectothermic, amniote vertebrates covered in overlapping scales. Does that mean snakes have great eyesight? Of course not! they don't wear glasses, because ears nope! but can hear? O. A few decades ago the answer was no, for obviously snakes don't have external ears. They have vestiges of the apparatus for hearing inside their heads, and that setup is attached to jaw bones, so they feel vibrations very well may hear low frequency airborne sounds 13 mar 2015 this question started article in first place. How? It's all in the vibrations reptiles pick up through their jaws you may think snakes are deaf since they do not possess external ears, but it has been discovered studies by j. We've never seen a snake with glasses. Reality check would it makes sense for an intelligent race the conceptual mind new directions in study of concepts google books result. Wikipedia anapsid 11 dec 2015 this red tailed boa (bconstrictor) has typical snake features. Do snakes have ears? Live science snake wikipedia en. Wikipedia wiki snake url? Q webcache. However, they do manage to sense what would be sounds animals with en. Snakes are elongated, legless, carnivorous reptiles of the suborder serpentes. How do snakes hear without ears? Does a snake have Quorawonderopolisyahoo answe
Views: 291 K Answers
The Amniotic Egg - by Mr. Barnett
 
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A song about the Amniotic egg. Audio made with the Songify App, visuals made with iMovie. For Mr. Barnett's 7th grade life science class. Lyrics: An amniotic egg can be laid on land because its membranes prevent the egg from drying out. YEAH! It is a shelled egg in which the embryo is nourished by yolk. WHAT WHAT! Produced by reptiles, birds, and egg-laying mammals, the amniotic egg enables them to complete their life cycles on dry land...land...land..land....
Views: 3259 barnett7science
AP Biology cvitale vertebrates.mp4
 
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Table of Contents: 00:06 - DEUTEROSTOMES 00:13 - CHORDATA 00:27 - SHARED STRUCTURES 02:31 - CEPHALOCHORDATA 03:23 - NEURAL CREST 03:44 - CEPHALIZATION 04:08 - CRANIATA 04:22 - SKELETON 04:57 - AGNATHANSMyxini- hagfish 05:46 - AGNATHANSCephalaspidomorph- Lampreys 06:27 - GNATHOSTOME 06:42 - DEVONIAN PERIODAge of fishes 07:20 - CHONDRICHTHYES 07:49 - 08:12 - 08:21 - 08:30 - 08:40 - 09:08 - 09:31 - 09:53 - Cloaca 10:04 - Rays 10:34 - 10:41 - 10:52 - 11:37 - RAY-FINNED FISH 11:48 - LOBE-FINNED FISH 12:01 - LUNGFISH 12:34 - TETRAPOD 12:48 - AMPHIBIANS 13:15 - SALAMANDER 13:25 - FROGS AND TOADS 13:39 - CAECILIANS 13:50 - 14:24 - 14:39 - 14:55 - AMNIOTES 15:07 - AMNIOTIC EGG 15:20 - 16:30 - 16:36 - 17:17 - REPTILES 17:32 - ECTOTHERMS 17:42 - 17:51 - TESTUDINES 17:57 - SPHENODONTIA 18:00 - SQUAMATA 18:03 - CROCODILIA 18:06 - BIRDS (AVES) 18:24 - 18:47 - ENDOTHERMIC 18:57 - 19:00 - 19:07 - 19:10 - 19:18 - 19:25 - 19:30 - 19:37 - THEROPODS 19:56 - ARCHAEOPTERYX 20:15 - RATITES 20:25 - CARINATES 20:32 - MAMMALS 20:42 - 20:53 - 21:09 - 21:16 - 21:27 - 21:39 - MONOTREMES 21:59 - MARSUPIALS 22:10 - PLACENTAL MAMMALS 22:17 - PRIMATES 22:21 - 22:32 - 22:37 - 22:49 - 22:53 - 22:58 - 23:06 - 23:24 - PROSIMIANS 23:33 - ANTHROPOIDS 23:42 - OLD WORLD 23:57 - NEW WORLD 24:08 - APES 24:14 - 24:20 - PALEOANTHROPOLOGY 24:26 - HOMINOIDHOMINID 24:52 - BIPEDAL POSTURE 25:04 - 25:19 - 25:36 - THE END
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