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Cryptographic Algorithms - Bart Preneel
 
01:31:37
Messages have been encrypted for millennia. Successfully hiding the plaintext has required increasingly sophisticated algorithms to defeat advances in crypto-analysis. Claude Shannon proved information theoretic security of the Vernam scheme, a.k.a. one-time pad. Since a one-time pad must be as long as the plaintext and can only be used once, the method is not widely used. Complexity theoretic security provides less strong but more practical security guarantees. Encryption provides confidentiality. In order to also ensure data authenticity, additional techniques are needed, such as Message Authentication Codes (MAC) or hashing. Alternatively, authenticated encryption combines confidentiality and data authenticity. Users of symmetric cryptography need to share a key between communicating parties. This is hard to do securely. Public key cryptology addresses this key distribution problem. Moreover, it affords digital signatures. In practice, public key cryptography is too slow to encrypt large amounts of data. Hence it is used for key agreement. A lecture by Bart Preneel at SecAppDev 2015 in Leuven, Belgium. Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the K.U.Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 934 secappdev.org
Cryptography Best Practices - Bart Preneel
 
01:41:25
Application architects need to make informed choices to use cryptography well: + Alternative key architectures have their merits and drawbacks. PKIs, in particular, should be contrasted with symmetric key architectures such as Kerberos. + Network protocol characteristics are pivotal in ensuring distributed applications meet security requirements. Key strength choices impact on security guarantees offered, as do cryptographic algorithm modes. + While strong keys and wise use of cryptographic algorithms may thwart cryptanalytic attack, applications are insecure without prudent key management. In this context, key generation and key storage require particular attention. + The selection of crypto-libraries requires awareness of inherent library qualities and failures. Application developers are advised not to implement their own. Learning objectives + decide if and when cryptography should be used. + make informed key architecture and management decisions. + use appropriate algorithms and parameters. + select an appropriate cryptographic library. + choose network protocols for distributed applications. This lecture was delivered by Bart Preneel at SecAppDev 2013 in Leuven, Belgium. Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the KU Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 2844 secappdev.org
Cryptography in a post-Snowden era - Bart Preneel
 
01:33:58
This lecture presents an overview of the Snowden revelations and the impact on our understanding of the security of our networks and systems. In particular, we discuss the known ways in which sophisticated attackers can bypass or undermine cryptography. We also speculate on how three-letter agencies could be breaking most encryption on the Internet. We relate this to the latest developments in cryptanalysis and discuss which cryptographic algorithms and implementations to select to stay protected. Learning objectives + Understand how sophisticated opponents agencies can undermine cryptographic protection + Understand how to maximize your chances to resist sophisticated opponents using cryptographic techniques This lecture was delivered by Bart Preneel at SecAppDev 2016, Leuven, Belgium Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the iMinds COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research areas are information security and privacy with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols and efficient and secure implementations. He has authored more than 400 scientific publications and is inventor of five patents. He teaches cryptology, network security and discete algebra at the KU Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), DTU (Denmark) and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He undertakes industrial consulting for major players in the finance, telco and hardware industry and has co-designed the Belgian eID and e-voting scheme. He is active in international standaridzation . Professor Preneel has served as Director, (1997-present), Vice President (2002-2007) and President (2008-2013) of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and is co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium). He is a fellow of the IACR, a member of the Permanent Stakeholders group of ENISA (European Network and Information Security Agency) and of the Academia Europaea. He has testified for the European and Belgian parliament. He has been invited speaker at more than 150 conferences and schools in 40 countries. In 2014 he received the RSA Award for Excellence in the Field of Mathematics.
Views: 849 secappdev.org
Entity Authentication and Symmetric Key Establishment - Bart Preneel
 
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Entity Authentication and Symmetric Key Establishment, by Bart Preneel Authentication methods are based on something known, owned, biometric, location or evidence of trusted third party authentication. + A password is a case of something known. Passwords are a vulnerable, but cheap and convenient way of authenticating an entity. Several techniques to augment their effectiveness are in use including challenge-response and one-time passwords. + Secure devices such as smart cards and USB tokens often combine the 'owned' with the 'known', since secret keys are locked in the token with a password or PIN code. However, within the broad category of secure tokens, trustworthiness is variable, depending on whether keys can be extracted, passwords can be eavesdropped or the device can be tampered with. + Biometry identifies a person via physical characteristics. + Location is often used as the sole authentication factor, but is insecure given the relative ease of spoofing IP or MAC addresses. + Multi-factor authentication is stronger than single-factor. + The Kerberos protocol uses a key distribution-based authentication server. Service consumers must authenticate with a central server to obtain a secret session key with service providers. Such schemes require a single sign-on to access servers across a trust domain. While public key cryptography is well suited to entity authentication, performance constraints often mandate a symmetric algorithm for encrypting data passed between systems. Key establishment should be linked to authentication, so that a party has assurances that a key is only shared with the authenticated party. The Diffie-Hellman key agreement protocol underlies a host of current technologies such as STS (Station-to-Station protocol) and IKE. Learning objectives Gain insight into + entity authentication protocols, + the benefits and limitations of authentication factors, + key establishment protocols, + why and how to use authentication servers. This lecture was delivered by Bart Preneel in Leuven on Tuesday February 11th at SecAppDev 2014. Professor Bart Preneel heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group at KU Leuven. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the KU Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 1396 secappdev.org
New Developments in Cryptology - Bart Preneel
 
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This lecture by Bart Preneel was delivered at SecAppDev Leuven 2013. Professor Bart Preneel of K.U. Leuven heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the K.U.Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 1408 secappdev.org
Post Snowden Cryptography or Who Holds Your Keys? - Bart Preneel
 
01:30:35
Post-Snowden cryptography, by Bart Preneel. This lecture presents an overview of the Snowden revelations and the impact on our understanding of the security of our networks and systems. In particular, it discusses the known ways in which sophisticated attackers can bypass or undermine cryptography. We also speculate on how three-letter agencies could be breaking most encryption on the Internet. We relate this to the latest developments in cryptanalysis and discuss which cryptographic algorithms and implementations to select to stay protected. Learning objectives + Understand how sophisticated opponents can undermine cryptographic protection + Understand how to maximize your chances to resist sophisticated opponents using cryptographic techniques This lecture was delivered by Bart Preneel at SecAppDev 2014 in Leuven, Belgium. Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the KU Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 1817 secappdev.org
Public Key Infrastructure Fundamentals - Bart Preneel
 
01:31:53
The function of a public key infrastructure (PKI) is to ensure secure delivery and management of public keys. Alternative trust models lead to different key architectures. Public keys are published by means of digitally signed certificates. A private key may be compromised, in which case the certificate containing the corresponding public key must be revoked. Many revocation methods are in current use. Publication of Certificate Revocation Lists (CRLs) and checking with an Online Certificate Status Protocol (OCSP) responder are best established. Learning objectives + learn the components of a public key infrastructure. + understand key delivery and management mechanisms. A lecture by Bart Preneel at SecAppDev 2013 in Leuven, Belgium. Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the K.U.Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 50589 secappdev.org
Big data and little privacy: there is no alternative? | Bart Preneel | TEDxULB
 
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Since NSA scandal was revealed, big data and privacy became a huge concern for many people around the world. Can those two coexist? Prof. Bart Preneel is a full professor at the KU Leuven, where he heads the COSIC research group, that is a member of the iMinds Security Department. He was visiting professor at five universities in Europe. He has authored more than 400 scientific publications and is inventor of 5 patents. His main research interests are cryptography, information security and privacy. He is a member of the Permanent Stakeholders group of ENISA (European Network and Information Security Agency) and of the Academia Europaea. He has been invited speaker at more than 100 conferences in 40 countries. In 2014 he received the RSA Award for Excellence in the Field of Mathematics. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 7247 TEDx Talks
Internet Security Protocols - Bart Preneel
 
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As well as being important practical examples of the use of PKIs, networking protocols such as SSL/TLS, HTTPS, SSH and IPsec are also of great interest to the designer of secure systems in their own right. Participants gain an appreciation of how security requirements influence the choice of network technology. Learning objectives Gain an overview of secure network protocols. This lecture was delivered by Bart Preneel at SecAppDev 2013 in Leuven, Belgium. Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the KU Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 8565 secappdev.org
Blockchain: Distributed Trust - Bart Preneel
 
01:34:45
The Bitcoin ecosystem had a bumpy start, but driven in part by the demand created by the Silk Road and perhaps the Cyprus crisis, the impact grew quickly: the total value of bitcoins rose to several billion US$ in the first two years (currently it is around US$ 14 billion), hundreds of alternative cryptocurrencies (altcoins) were created and large mining entities were established, mostly in China. The ideas behind Bitcoin have opened up new approaches to cryptocurrencies, but also to distributed consensus, distributed naming, secure timestamping and commitment. One of the aspects that have drawn the most interest is the smart contract (that is, cryptographically enforceable agreements) on top of the Bitcoin ecosystem (or on other systems such as Ethereum). Even if some observers predict that the Bitcoin ecosystem will disappear or become irrelevant, the core ideas have already made a major impact. Unlike any other payment system or cryptocurrency created before, Bitcoin allows for fully decentralized generation of currency and fully decentralized verification of transactions. The core idea is the blockchain, a public ledger that registers all transactions under the form of a hash chain; the blockchain describes the state of the system, that is, it specifies who owns which amount. Transactions themselves are validated based on a scripting language, which creates some flexibility. In a distributed system, a central problem is how to achieve consensus (e.g., how to deal with double-spending transactions). Transactions are broadcast over a low-latency peer-to-peer network that offers some robustness against censoring or sabotage. This approach allows the Bitcoin ecosystem to achieve distributed consensus in a practical way assuming that players are rational (something which is known to be unachievable without additional assumptions such as rationality) albeit at the cost of a major computational effort in terms of mining. While the financial industry is less interested in the anarchistic aspects of the Bitcoin ecosystem (the governance model and the uncontrolled money supply), the distributed consensus idea is very appealing and is believed to have a very high business potential for a large number of financial transactions and interactions. In 2015, about US$ 1 billion was invested in venture capital in the area of blockchain and cryptocurrencies and the Aite Group predicted in 2016 that blockchain market could be worth as much as US$ 400 million in annual business by 2019. The idea of a public ledger for timestamping and registering documents using hash chains is more than 25 years old, as witnessed by the efforts of Surety Technologies in the early 1990 and the ISO standardization in this area in the mid 1990s –- but these earlier approaches did use a central authority to register all transactions. Bitcoin has inspired many actors to revisit those ideas by `taming’ the Bitcoin ecosystem into a private or permissioned ledger, where only a few selected actors have control over new currencies or verification of transactions (to get rid of distributed control) and where access to the ledger can be restricted (to get rid of full transparency). Some of the notable developments in this context are the open source initiative of IBM that is called Hyperledger and Intel's experimental Sawtooth Lake architecture. Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the imec-COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research areas are information security and privacy with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols and efficient and secure implementations. He undertakes industrial consulting for major players in the finance, telco and hardware industry and has co-designed the Belgian eID and e-voting scheme. He is active in international standardization . Professor Preneel has served as Director, (1997-present), Vice President (2002-2007) and President (2008-2013) of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and is co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium). He is a fellow of the IACR, a member of the Permanent Stakeholders group of ENISA (European Network and Information Security Agency) and of the Academia Europaea. He has testified for the European and Belgian parliament. He has been invited speaker at more than 150 conferences and schools in 40 countries. In 2014 he received the RSA Award for Excellence in the Field of Mathematics.
Views: 2151 secappdev.org
Cryptographic and Information Security in the Post-Snowden Era - Bart Preneel
 
01:37:24
This lecture presents an overview of the Snowden revelations and the impact on our understanding of the security of our networks and systems. In particular, we discuss the known ways in which sophisticated attackers can bypass or undermine cryptography. We also speculate on how three-letter agencies could be breaking most encryption on the Internet. We relate this to the latest developments in cryptanalysis and discuss which cryptographic algorithms and implementations to select to stay protected. This lecture was delivered at SecAppDev 2015 in Leuven. Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the iMinds COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research areas are information security and privacy with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols and efficient and secure implementations. He has authored more than 400 scientific publications and is inventor of five patents. He teaches cryptology, network security and discete algebra at the KU Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), DTU (Denmark) and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He undertakes industrial consulting for major players in the finance, telco and hardware industry and has co-designed the Belgian eID and e-voting scheme. He is active in international standaridzation . Professor Preneel has served as Director, (1997-present), Vice President (2002-2007) and President (2008-2013) of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and is co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium). He is a fellow of the IACR, a member of the Permanent Stakeholders group of ENISA (European Network and Information Security Agency) and of the Academia Europaea. He has testified for the European and Belgian parliament. He has been invited speaker at more than 150 conferences and schools in 40 countries. In 2014 he received the RSA Award for Excellence in the Field of Mathematics.
Views: 514 secappdev.org
Encryption: blessing or curse for IT security - DIGITEC 2016
 
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DIGITEC 2016: Digital Future Session on 'Encryption: blessing or curse for IT security' Encryption plays a crucial role in securing information systems and the business data they contain. External communications are routinely encrypted and network traffic inside an organisation is increasingly encrypted to reduce the risk that attackers that can get access to an organisation's vital information. Increasingly it is standard practice that information is encrypted for storage. But encryption can also be exploited by attackers. Malware can be hidden inside incoming encrypted communications so as to avoid antivirus scanning and to cover the exfiltration of sensitive information from data loss prevention systems. IT security defenders are looking for ways to look inside such traffic to protect the organisation. What are the legally sound, organisationally proportionate and technically effective measures that can be used to protect business systems against the misuse of encryption? This session will examine: • The risks associated with the use of encryption in an organisation • Technical options for defence against misuse of encryption • The organisational policy and legal issues associated Speakers • Keith Martin, Professor of Information Security, University of London • Maresa Meissl, Head of Unit of Information Security, Security Directorate, DG Informatics (EC) • Bart Preneel, Professor at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven • Vincent Steckler, Chief Executive Offive, Avast Software Moderator: Ken Ducatel, Director, IT Security Directorate, DG Informatics (EC)
Views: 133 EP Technology
Network Security, Part 1 : Basic Encryption Techniques
 
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Fundamental concepts of network security are discussed. It provides a good overview of secret Key and public key Encryption. Important data encryption standards are presented.
Views: 13834 Scholartica Channel
The future of cryptography
 
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Invited talk by Bart Preneel, Eurocrypt 2016.
Views: 1458 TheIACR
Cryptographic Algorithms
 
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On the next link you can read more about this topic: http://scienceup.org/computer-science/cryptographic-algorithms/
Views: 276 ScienceUp.org
What is Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) by Securemetric
 
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This video explains to you how PKI works to create a secure environment.
Views: 73462 SecureMetric
Annual Privacy Forum 2014, Prof Bart Preneel
 
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Prof. Bart Preneel, KU Leuven. talks about privacy issues during the Annual Privacy Forum 2014
Views: 129 ENISAvideos
Bart Preneel speaking to Projects at iMinds The Conference
 
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Bart Preneel is a full professor at the KU Leuven, where he heads the COSIC research group, which is a member of the iMinds Security Department. Professor Preneel moderated the panel discussion at the Internet of Things session of iMinds The Conference last week in Brussels. Professor Preneel, visiting professor at five universities in Europe, author of more than 400 scientific publications and inventor of four patents spoke to Projects about his main research interests of cryptography, information security and privacy. This work is, of course, vital for the development of a secure internet of things and Professor Preneel is confident that secure connectivity between people, things and the internet can be achieved. Professor Preneel has coordinated the Network of Excellence ECRYPT, has served as panel member and chair for the European Research Council and has been president of the IACR (International Association for Cryptologic Research). He is a member of the Permanent Stakeholders group of ENISA (European Network and Information Security Agency) and of the Academia Europaea. He has been invited speaker at more than 90 conferences in 40 countries. In 2014 he received the RSA Award for Excellence in the Field of Mathematics.
Views: 52 William Davis
Hash Functions Based on Three Permutations: A Generic Se ...
 
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Talk at crypto 2012. Authors: Bart Mennink, Bart Preneel. See http://www.iacr.org/cryptodb/data/paper.php?pubkey=24288
Views: 272 TheIACR
Network Security Fundamentals
 
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eLearning - 23 Jan 2013
Views: 98353 APNIC Training
Network Security: Classical Encryption Techniques
 
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Fundamental concepts of encryption techniques are discussed. Symmetric Cipher Model Substitution Techniques Transposition Techniques Product Ciphers Steganography
Views: 6440 Scholartica Channel
Computer and Network Security - IPsec
 
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Computer and Network Security - IPsec
Views: 17438 Jeffrey Miller
1. Introduction to Cryptography and Data Security (Part 1 of 3)
 
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A lecture for a college course -- CNIT 140: Cryptography for Computer Networks at City College San Francisco Based on "Understanding Cryptography: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners" by Christof Paar, Jan Pelzl, and Bart Preneel, ISBN: 3642041000 Instructor: Sam Bowne More info: https://samsclass.info/141/141_F17.shtml
Views: 354 Sam Bowne
Transport Layer Security - Applied Cryptography
 
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This video is part of an online course, Applied Cryptography. Check out the course here: https://www.udacity.com/course/cs387.
Views: 14260 Udacity
Public Key Cryptography Tutorial
 
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This video provides a description of public key cryptography and how asymmetric encryption secures data in a network.
Views: 281 TELEGRID
Data Interception and Public Key Encryption - Information Security Lesson #9 of 12
 
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Dr. Soper discusses malicious data interception and public key encryption. Topics covered include wiretapping, defending against message interception, network encryption methods, the key exchange problem, public key encryption, RSA encryption, and key exchange using public key encryption.
Views: 20536 Dr. Daniel Soper
1. Introduction to Cryptography and Data Security (Part 3 of 3)
 
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A lecture for a college course -- CNIT 140: Cryptography for Computer Networks at City College San Francisco Based on "Understanding Cryptography: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners" by Christof Paar, Jan Pelzl, and Bart Preneel, ISBN: 3642041000 Instructor: Sam Bowne More info: https://samsclass.info/141/141_F17.shtml
Views: 146 Sam Bowne
1. Introduction to Cryptography and Data Security (Part 2 of 3)
 
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A lecture for a college course -- CNIT 140: Cryptography for Computer Networks at City College San Francisco Based on "Understanding Cryptography: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners" by Christof Paar, Jan Pelzl, and Bart Preneel, ISBN: 3642041000 Instructor: Sam Bowne More info: https://samsclass.info/141/141_F17.shtml
Views: 150 Sam Bowne
CNIT 141: 9. Elliptic Curve Cryptosystems
 
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A lecture for a college course -- CNIT 141: Cryptography for Computer Networks at City College San Francisco Based on "Understanding Cryptography: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners" by Christof Paar, Jan Pelzl, and Bart Preneel, ISBN: 3642041000 Instructor: Sam Bowne More info: https://samsclass.info/141/141_F17.shtml
Views: 118 Sam Bowne
Overview on Modern Cryptography
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 34796 nptelhrd
Network Protocols: Cryptography in Network Protocols
 
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Discussion of cryptography basics as applied in network protocols: concepts, symmetric key encryption. (V2)
Views: 435 sweprof
Computer and Network Security - Intrusion Detection Systems
 
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Computer and Network Security - Intrusion Detection Systems
Views: 15029 Jeffrey Miller
CNIT 141: 6. Introduction to Public-Key Cryptography (Part 1 of 3)
 
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A lecture for a college course -- CNIT 140: Cryptography for Computer Networks at City College San Francisco Based on "Understanding Cryptography: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners" by Christof Paar, Jan Pelzl, and Bart Preneel, ISBN: 3642041000 Instructor: Sam Bowne More info: https://samsclass.info/141/141_F17.shtml
Views: 99 Sam Bowne
Information Security—Before & After Public-Key Cryptography
 
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[Recorded Jan 26, 2005] Whitfield Diffie, a key figure in the discovery of public-key cryptography, traces the growth of information security through the 20th century and into the 21st. In the 1970s, the world of information security was transformed by public-key cryptography, the radical revision of cryptographic thinking that allowed people with no prior contact to communicate securely. "Public key" solved security problems born of the revolution in information technology that characterized the 20th century and made Internet commerce possible. Security problems rarely stay solved, however. Continuing growth in computing, networking, and wireless applications have given rise to new security problems that are already confronting us.
Views: 104801 Computer History Museum
CNIT 141: 11. Hash Functions
 
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A lecture for a college course -- CNIT 141: Cryptography for Computer Networks at City College San Francisco Based on "Understanding Cryptography: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners" by Christof Paar, Jan Pelzl, and Bart Preneel, ISBN: 3642041000 Instructor: Sam Bowne More info: https://samsclass.info/141/141_F17.shtml
Views: 94 Sam Bowne
CNIT 141: 6. Introduction to Public-Key Cryptography (Part 2 of 3)
 
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A lecture for a college course -- CNIT 140: Cryptography for Computer Networks at City College San Francisco Based on "Understanding Cryptography: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners" by Christof Paar, Jan Pelzl, and Bart Preneel, ISBN: 3642041000 Instructor: Sam Bowne More info: https://samsclass.info/141/141_F17.shtml
Views: 54 Sam Bowne
CNIT 140: Ch 2. Stream Ciphers  (Part 2 of 2)
 
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For a college course -- CNIT 140: "Cryptography for Computer Networks" at City College San Francisco Instructor: Sam Bowne More info: https://samsclass.info/141/141_F17.shtml Based on "Understanding Cryptography: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners" by Christof Paar, Jan Pelzl, and Bart Preneel, ISBN: 3642041000
Views: 55 Sam Bowne
The 2011 IACR Fellowship Induction Ceremony
 
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Crypto 2011 Rump session presentation for Bart Preneel, talk given by Bart Preneel
Views: 580 TheIACR
S-MIME email encryption: The Concept
 
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Quick into about the basics of public key email encryption, including the why and how, before I get into the "How to set it up" screencasts next.
Views: 41677 IbnFergus
CNIT 141: 6. Introduction to Public-Key Cryptography (Part 3 of 3)
 
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A lecture for a college course -- CNIT 140: Cryptography for Computer Networks at City College San Francisco Based on "Understanding Cryptography: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners" by Christof Paar, Jan Pelzl, and Bart Preneel, ISBN: 3642041000 Instructor: Sam Bowne More info: https://samsclass.info/141/141_F17.shtml
Views: 59 Sam Bowne
The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) - Interview with prof. Vincent Rijmen (KU Leuven)
 
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The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) - Interview with prof. Vincent Rijmen (KU Leuven) - with English subtitles
Security+ Digital Signatures
 
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Security+ cryptography topic. How digital signatures are created.
Views: 51475 Darril Gibson
CSE571-11-01: Cryptography and Network Security: Overview
 
35:25
Audio/Video Recording of Professor Raj Jain's class lecture on Cryptography and Network Security: Overview. It covers Standards Organizations, Security Components, OSI Security Architecture, Aspects of Security, Passive Attacks, Active Attacks, Security Services (X.800), Security Mechanism, Security Mechanisms (X.800), Services and Mechanisms Relationship, Model for Network Security, Model for Network Access Security, Security URLs
Views: 18980 Raj Jain
CNIT 125: 10. Digital Signatures
 
54:53
A lecture for a college course -- CNIT 141: Cryptography for Computer Networks at City College San Francisco Based on "Understanding Cryptography: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners" by Christof Paar, Jan Pelzl, and Bart Preneel, ISBN: 3642041000 Instructor: Sam Bowne More info: https://samsclass.info/141/141_F17.shtml
Views: 98 Sam Bowne
Introduction to Cryptography
 
15:00
A 15min snippet of Christof Paar's 2-semester course "Introduction to Cryptography" at U Bochum
Views: 7047 Christof Paar
What is PKI (Public Key Infrastructure)?
 
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What is PKI (Public Key Infrastructure)? Discover what you need to know about the level of security PKI provides, how easy it is to implement and how convenient it is for users. Public key infrastructures (PKIs) are relied upon to secure a broad range of digital applications, validating everything from transactions and identities to supply chains. However, infrastructure vulnerabilities represent a significant risk to the organizations that rely on PKI alone to safeguard digital applications. Gemalto offers PKI encryption key management solutions to help you protect the keys at the heart of PKI as well as PKI-based authentication tokens that leverage the security benefits offered by PKI to deliver dependable identity protection Watch and learn how PKI can benefit you and your organization. ===================== Share: https://youtu.be/vyMBTyBV_xg Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/SafeNetInc ===================== Our solutions: https://safenet.gemalto.com/data-protection/pki-security-solutions/
Views: 18027 Gemalto Security
CNIT 141: 5. More About Block Ciphers (Part 1 of 3)
 
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A lecture for a college course -- CNIT 140: Cryptography for Computer Networks at City College San Francisco Based on "Understanding Cryptography: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners" by Christof Paar, Jan Pelzl, and Bart Preneel, ISBN: 3642041000 Instructor: Sam Bowne More info: https://samsclass.info/141/141_F17.shtml
Views: 67 Sam Bowne
CNIT 141: 5. More About Block Ciphers (Part 3 of 3)
 
05:00
A lecture for a college course -- CNIT 140: Cryptography for Computer Networks at City College San Francisco Based on "Understanding Cryptography: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners" by Christof Paar, Jan Pelzl, and Bart Preneel, ISBN: 3642041000 Instructor: Sam Bowne More info: https://samsclass.info/141/141_F17.shtml
Views: 47 Sam Bowne
CNIT 141: 5. More About Block Ciphers (Part 2 of 3)
 
37:20
A lecture for a college course -- CNIT 140: Cryptography for Computer Networks at City College San Francisco Based on "Understanding Cryptography: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners" by Christof Paar, Jan Pelzl, and Bart Preneel, ISBN: 3642041000 Instructor: Sam Bowne More info: https://samsclass.info/141/141_F17.shtml
Views: 52 Sam Bowne

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