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Mongolia's Mining Boom (2012)
 
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The Big Dig: Mongolia is the new frontier in a massive, break-neck speed resources rush. But as it races to take advantage of Chinese demand, helped along by Rio Tinto, what is it getting from digging up the steppes? For similar stories, see: The Children Risking Their Lives In Underwater Gold Mines https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1L_pxYZVwE Is Bolivia's Lithium-mining Industry Expanding Beyond Its Control? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P7bKoAaHXqw Is Space Mining Set To Change The World? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKAQmE1Iexw Subscribe to journeyman for daily uploads: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures For downloads and more information visit: http://www.journeyman.tv/film/5694/the-big-dig Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journeymanpictures Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JourneymanVOD https://twitter.com/JourneymanNews Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/journeymanpictures Genghis Khan must be rolling in his grave as foreigners arrive in Mongolia to plunder his once mighty domain. Australian miner Rio Tinto is about to open one of the biggest copper mines on the planet in Mongolia, which will soon account for more than 30% of the country's entire GDP. "Some of the optimistic geologists we have say that this business could run for up to 100 years", Cameron McRae from Rio Tinto explains. But the company only cedes the Mongolian government a 34% stake, provoking worries about where the benefits of Mongolia's resource wealth will go. There's concerns the government is ill-equipped to strike complex mining deals in the national interest. "The deal is a financial transaction and whether it's really beneficial to Mongolia, I have many doubts about that", argues Dorjdari from the Responsible Mining Initiative. Environmentalists also worry that the mining push has come so fast and so aggressively that proper checks and balances are not in place. "Most tourists come to Mongolia because they want to see that pristine open space blue sky, but what if we couldn't offer it anymore?" ABC Australia – Ref. 5694 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.
Views: 31740 Journeyman Pictures
City of Gold, South Pass City - Main Street, Wyoming
 
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From the initial discovery of gold in the mid 1800's to the creation of a state historic site, South Pass City has witnessed much of Wyoming's history. In addition to being the site of Wyoming's first big gold strike, South Pass City was instrumental in Wyoming becoming a territory and ultimately a state. It was the birthplace of women's suffrage, the first territory to grant women the right to vote and hold public office. But South Pass City is perhaps best known as Wyoming's first boom and bust town, with hard working and hard drinking miners, loose women, gambling and the entrepreneurial businesses who profited from their dreams of instant wealth.
Views: 10836 Wyoming PBS
Cue, Western Australia (HD)
 
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Cue, Western Australia (HD) - Cue, WA Tourism and vacation Travel Videos HD, World Travel Guide http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=World1Tube The small town of Cue in Western Australia's Murchison Region is to me a particularly interesting outback town. Like so many old WA mining towns, Cue has thrived and floundered over the years with times of boom and bust. The town was established in 1893 following the discovery of gold in the area the year before, which sparked a gold rush to the remote Murchison Region desert. In its heyday at the beginning of the twentieth century Cue was home to over 10000 people, a thriving and prosperous town known as "The Queen of the Murchison". These days things couldn't be more different. With a population of less than 300, Cue is very close to being a ghost town. When we visited Cue earlier this year the wide streets were still and silent beneath a big blue desert sky. The whole time we were there we didn't see a single soul walking around town and we noticed a good number of the buildings were abandoned or up for lease. The empty streets of Cue would have felt really quite spooky if it weren't for the constant parade of roadtrains roaring through on their way between Perth and the Pilbara carrying fuel and massive pieces of mining equipment. This for me is what made Cue such a memorable place -- the decay and ghostliness of the semi-abandoned town, and the way it felt as if time had stood still there ever since the 1930′s. However I have a feeling that Cue might be quite a different place in a few years time as the shire seems to be going to some effort to restore the town's buildings to their former glory and attract more visitors to the town and surrounding region. And with rumours of a new big mine opening in the area, the population could soon be set to rise again. Gracious Heritage Architecture in Cue =========================== Walking around the streets of Cue feel like stepping back in time. Not much appears to have changed on the main street over the years. Almost all of the buildings are the original ones that were built in the 1890′s and 1900′s -- some still serving their original purpose, some beautifully restored and others abandoned and left to ruin. While a lot of the old heritage Goldrush-era buildings look crumbling and decrepit, I can still understand why Cue's town slogan is "Queen of the Murchison". Some of the old sandstone buildings sure are grand for a dusty outpost in the middle of nowhere! Visiting and Exploring Around Cue, Western Australia =============================== If you happen to be heading up Great Northern Highway for any reason -- on your way to Karijini and the Pilbara perhaps -- then I highly recommend making a stop in Cue. It is an interesting and memorable place to spend some time in and is well-situated for a stopover on a long outback drive, being 650km from Perth and approximately half way to Newman and Karijini. If you've got a bit of time to spare while you're in the area, it's well worth taking a half-day detour westwards out to Walga Rock and the ghost town Big Bell. Things to See and Do in and Around Cue, Western Australia ================================ Go for a drive or walk around town and have a look at the interesting and beautiful old heritage buildings. Government Buildings -- police station, court house and post office Gentleman's Club (now the shire office) Masonic Lodge building Bank of New South Wales building Rotunda (site of the town's first well) Pensioner huts and old gaol (part of the caravan park) Check out the historical photograph collection in the shire office building (formerly the town Gentleman's Club) to gain some more context to the history of Cue. Drive up to the top of the Radio Tower Hill (Cue Lookout) for views over the town, the nearby mines, and horizon-to-horizon dry red earth. A good idea is to pick up the brochure and follow the Cue Heritage Trail, which will take around to the main attractions in the surrounding area and provide interesting background info. Try fossicking for gold -- you never know, you could get lucky! In late winter and spring the beautiful desert wildflowers bloom to life, carpeting the red dusty ground in fields of colour. This is the best time of year to visit Cue and explore the surrounding country. Camp out for the night or just enjoy the beautiful scenery and wildlife at Lake Nallan, a nature reserve about 24km north of Cue Or camp/picnic at Milly Soak, 16km north of Cue. Also has a small pioneer cemetery and well Head out west along Austin Downs Road to Walga Rock to see the cave paintings, climb the rock and perhaps camp there for the night. While in the area, check out what remains of Big Bell, a ghost town.
Views: 5730 World Travel Guides
Boom or Bust:  Public Lands, Private Profits
 
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https://secure.sierraclub.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=7945 As a nearby coal mine threatens majestic Bryce Canyon, an age-old fight over tourism versus extraction engulfs a small Utah town. Watch the full three-part series, "Public Lands, Private Profits" at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB22CDA7486946070&feature=view_all - Founded by legendary conservationist John Muir in 1892, the Sierra Club is now the nation's largest and most influential grassroots environmental organization -- with more than two million members and supporters. Our successes range from protecting millions of acres of wilderness to helping pass the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and Endangered Species Act. More recently, we've made history by leading the charge to address climate disruption by moving away from the dirty fossil fuels and toward a clean energy economy. Visit us here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SierraClub Twitter: https://twitter.com/sierraclub Instagram: https://instagram.com/sierraclub
Views: 836 NationalSierraClub
Abandoned Mining Town: Coal mining hub stands abandoned in the U.S.
 
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Just like Ukraine's Chornobyl, Centralia was abandoned after disaster hit the community Check out our website: http://uatoday.tv Facebook: https://facebook.com/uatodaytv Twitter: https://twitter.com/uatodaytv
Views: 348 UKRAINE TODAY
The Ghost Town At Vulture Mine
 
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Take a deeper dive and access the research notes here: https://www.buzzfeed.com/watch/video/33390?placement=YTD We search for the buried spirits of a lawless frontier town Check out more awesome videos at BuzzFeedBlue! https://bit.ly/YTbuzzfeedvideo https://bit.ly/YTbuzzfeedblue1 https://bit.ly/YTbuzzfeedviolet GET MORE BUZZFEED: https://www.buzzfeed.com https://www.buzzfeed.com/videos https://www.youtube.com/buzzfeedvideo https://www.youtube.com/boldly https://www.youtube.com/buzzfeedblue https://www.youtube.com/buzzfeedviolet https://www.youtube.com/perolike https://www.youtube.com/ladylike BuzzFeedBlue Sports, video games, Unsolved & more epic daily videos! Credits: https://www.buzzfeed.com/bfmp/videos/33489 MUSIC Licensed via Audio Network SFX Provided By AudioBlocks (https://www.audioblocks.com) Be Afraid Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. End of the World Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. Doomsday Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. All Around Me Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. B Train Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. That Hurts Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. They Come Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. Seasick Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. In Your Face Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. Down the Hole Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. Not Feeling Well Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. STILLS Ghost Town Alec Cohen/Getty Images Inside abandoned gold mine tunnel or shaft in the Nevada desert. NeilLockhart/Getty Images falling rock slide TobinC/Getty Images Dangerous Mine Entrance mrdoomits/Getty Images Dirty Adult Male Gold Miner Staring at the Camera ysbrandcosijn/Getty Images Hanging tree AdrianHillman/Getty Images mars SSSCCC/Getty Images United Kingdom, England, London, View of Big Ben and Westminster Bridge reds/Getty Images Mould growth, close up detail Jonathan Knowles/Getty Images Temporary Base Camp in Peralta Canyon Historical / Contributor/Getty Images Portrait of Robert O'Hara Burke... De Agostini Picture Library / Contributor/Getty Images Old schoolhouse ruin GeoStock/Getty Images Henry Wickenburg bust by Clyde Ross Morgan at Tegner Street. Witold Skrypczak/Getty Images Native Gold on Quartz, Nevada John Cancalosi/Getty Images Gold Mining Kean Collection / Staff/Getty Images Superfortress Factory FPG / Staff/Getty Images Miners During The California Gold Rush Kean Collection / Staff/Getty Images Interior Of Tunnel In California Gold Mine Kean Collection / Staff/Getty Images Directly Above View Of Tunnel At Abandoned Gold Mine Kawazu Fumi Minoru / EyeEm/Getty Images Gold Bar Against White Background Martin Konopka / EyeEm/Getty Images Desert landscape vlynder/Getty Images Prospectors KenWiedemann/Getty Images Tall Cactus marks the entry to Goldmine Dusty Pixel photography/Getty Images VIDEO Old Film Look V2 GokhanApaydin/Getty Images
Views: 6452466 BuzzFeed Multiplayer
Denver, Colorado United States. History, Economy, Climate
 
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Denver  is the capital and most populous municipality of Colorado of the U.S. states. Denver is ranked as a Beta- world city by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network. In 2016, Denver was named the best place to live in the United States by U.S. News & World Report. Denver sits at an altitude of 5,280 feet (1,600 m) above sea level and lies where the Great Plains give way to the Rocky Mountains. LOCATION Denver is located in the South Platte River Valley on the western edge of the High Plains just east of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Denver is the largest city in the Rocky Mountains region of the United States. Known as "The Mile-High City". Denver is in the center of the Front Range Urban Corridor, between the Rocky Mountains to the west and the High Plains to the east. Denver's topography consists of plains in the city center with hilly areas to the north, west and south. HISTORY In the summer of 1858, during the Pike's Peak Gold Rush, a group of gold prospectors from Lawrence, Kansas established Montana City as a mining town on the banks of the South Platte River in what was then western Kansas Territory. This was the first historical settlement in what was later to become the city of Denver. POPULATION Denver is the 19th-most populous U.S. city, it has been one of the fastest-growing major cities in the United States. CLIMATE Denver residents enjoy a temperate climate and about 300 days of sunshine per year, with four pronounced seasons.Denver experiences average winter temperatures warmer than those of cities along Mid-Atlantic, the Midwest and New England. The city typically receives about 60 inches (153 cm) of snow per year. Spring in Denver is pleasant. Trees begin budding by late March and are in full leaf by mid April to mid May. By June, Denver enters its summer season. Temperatures typically rise in earnest at this time, with most heat waves beginning in mid-June and continuing through August. July is usually Denver's hottest month with temperatures to over 31-38 °C. COMMUNICATION Denver International Airport Commonly referred to as DIA, it is located about 18 miles northeast of downtown. DIA is located in a rural area, quite far from any conceivable local destination. The A Line is a commuter train that runs from the airport to Union Station in Downtown Denver. Trains usually run every 15 minutes during peak travel times. DIA is also served by a few local bus lines. GOVERNMENT Denver is a consolidated city-county with a mayor elected on a nonpartisan ballot, a 13-member city council and an auditor. The Denver City Council is elected from 11 districts with two at-large council-members. Denver has a strong city council government. The mayor can approve or veto any ordinances or resolutions approved by the council.  However, the council can override the mayor's veto with a nine out of thirteen member vote. ECONOMY Denver's economy is based partially on its geographic position and its connection to some of the country's major transportation systems. Because Denver is the largest city within 500 miles. it has become a natural location for storage and distribution of goods and services to the Mountain States, Southwest states, as well as all western states. Another benefit for distribution is that Denver is nearly equidistant from large cities of the Midwest, such as Chicago and St. Louis and some large cities of the West Coast, such as Los Angeles and San Francisco. Denver's position near the mineral-rich Rocky Mountains encouraged mining and energy companies to spring up in the area. In the early days of the city, gold and silver booms and busts played a large role in the city's economic success.
Views: 356 Canvas4U
When to exit a mining town
 
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Property researcher John Lindeman talks to API journalist Lauren Day about when the right time is to sell your mining town investments.
Mining boom behind Gladstone housing shortage
 
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Gladstone in central Queensland is suffering from a severe housing shortage due to a population boom of workers in the liquefied natural gas industry.
Independent Lens | Deep Down | Virtual Mine | PBS
 
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http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/deep-down/ Step into a virtual mining town in Second Life. Premiering Tuesday, November 23. Check local listings: http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/broadcast.html Deep in the Appalachian mountains of eastern Kentucky, Beverly May and Terry Ratliff find themselves at the center of a contentious community battle over a proposed mountaintop removal coal mine. DEEP DOWN puts a human face on the consequences of our environmental impact. Any exploration of power production in America will lead to Appalachia, a region that has supplied our nation with coal for over a century. As America's energy consumption rises, the extraction and burning of coal to meet these demands has dramatically altered the Appalachian landscape, economy, and culture. Mountaintop removal mining has stripped swaths of the ancient hills down into barren, flat-topped environmental catastrophes. Coal is the number one industry here, with an enormous influence on local economies and people. Simultaneously, Appalachia as a region deserves our attention as a place of history, complexity, and change. It is time for us to look back to this "forgotten" region. We must trace the power lines from our homes to people far removed from our daily lives. Find out more about DEEP DOWN: http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/deep-down/ Learn more about "Independent Lens": ‪http://www.pbs.org/independentlens‬ Watch "Independent Lens" films online: http://video.pbs.org/program/1218239994/
Views: 2099 PBS
Argyle shifts to locals in preference to FIFO workers
 
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The Argyle Diamond Mine, one of the first fly in fly out minesites in WA has shifted its focus from a FIFO workforce to employing locals
Views: 10488 ABC News (Australia)
Mining boom threatens Tasmania's forests
 
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Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe The ancient forests of the Tarkine in north western Tasmania were protected by the Australian government as a site of "national heritage". But that listing has lapsed, and the government seems in no hurry to re-impose it. At the same time, resources companies are applying to mine the mineral-rich area, something that conservationists say is threatening the environment. Al Jazeera's Andrew Thomas reports from Tasmania.
Views: 3628 Al Jazeera English
Boom, Bust, Boom: What is copper, what is the copper mining industry?
 
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Bill Carter explains how he researched copper mining history, interviewed miners mining executives, traveled around the world and followed his curiosity when writing "Boom, Bust, Boom." For more: www.boombustboombook.com
Views: 136 Mike Phillips
Dakota Pathways:  Mining Booms and Busts
 
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Dakota Pathways: A History was a 20-part series used by Educator's across South Dakota for use in their classrooms. The 14 minute long segments explore some of the history of South Dakota. Mining Booms and Busts is the 6th segment produced in the series. I was walking down the sidewalk the other day when I came across a little boy digging in the lawn beside me. I asked the little boy what he was digging for, and he replied to me that he was searching for treasure. Mining in the Black HillsI asked him if he had ever heard the saying, "if you dig deep enough into the earth, you will end up in China"? That would be a lot of digging, considering it would mean that you would have to dig all the way through the earth and come out on the other side. This got me thinking. What I would like to know is what do you find when you dig deep into the earth's surface? Do you find different things in different locations? If I dig in South Dakota and Florida, will I find the same things buried below our feet? Even if we wanted to find out what was beneath us, how would we do it? Do you think that there are machines big enough to do the job? If we dug everywhere we thought there might be something valuable, don't you think we would be surrounded by holes? What about in the past when people dug, what happened to all of those places? These are just a few questions that came racing through my mind as I watched the little boy dig for his treasure. I continued on my way down the sidewalk, and later, this is what I found out...
Views: 1434 SDPB
"Fear the Boom and Bust": Keynes vs. Hayek Rap Battle
 
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Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/econstories If you enjoyed this video, you should watch this one next: http://youtu.be/Mq2iQAsJAhI Produced by Emergent Order. Visit us at http://www.emergentorder.com. Econstories.tv is a place to learn about the economic way of thinking through the eyes of creative director John Papola and creative economist Russ Roberts. Explore more at http://EconStories.tv In Fear the Boom and Bust, John Maynard Keynes and F. A. Hayek, two of the great economists of the 20th century, come back to life to attend an economics conference on the economic crisis. Before the conference begins, and at the insistence of Lord Keynes, they go out for a night on the town and sing about why there's a "boom and bust" cycle in modern economies and good reason to fear it. DOWNLOAD THE SONG in the highest quality possible here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/fear-the-boom-and-bust/id1177081191 Plus, to see and hear more from the stars of Fear the Boom and Bust, Billy Scafuri and Adam Lustick, visit their site: http://www.billyandadam.com Music was produced by Jack Bradley at Blackboard3 Music and Sound Design. It was composed and performed by Richard Royston Jacobs. **Charging Bull© Arturo DiModica, 1998
Views: 6706701 Emergent Order
WSU 4.23.14 Copper Mining - A lecture by Bill Carter
 
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The Washington State University Vancouver Center for Social and Environmental Justice and the Gifford Pinchot Task Force will host author Bill Carter who will talk about a proposed copper mine near Mount St. Helens. The lecture will be held at 6:30 p.m. April 23 in the Dengerink Administration Building, Room 110. The event is free and open to the public. Carter wrote "Boom, Bust, Boom - A Story About Copper, the Metal that Runs the World." The book is an account of the presence of copper in our lives and its cost on health, the economy and the environment. Carter was poisoned by vegetables grown in his family garden, contaminated with invisible pollutants from a once prosperous copper mining industry. His experience sent him on an international discovery mission to learn more about what he describes as the most important metal in modern society. The Canadian company Ascot Resources Ltd. has begun exploratory drilling 12 miles from the crater of Mount St. Helens in the Green River watershed, which provides clean drinking water to Southwest Washington communities. Carter stresses his book is not anti-mining. He just believes certain mines should not be in certain places. This video can be viewed and downloaded here: https://archive.org/details/Wsu4.23.14CopperMinning-ALectureByBillCarter
Views: 743 Joe Anybody
Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the Wild, Wild, West, which as it turns out, wasn't as wild as it seemed in the movies. When we think of the western expansion of the United States in the 19th century, we're conditioned to imagine the loner. The self-reliant, unattached cowpoke roaming the prairie in search of wandering calves, or the half-addled prospector who has broken from reality thanks to the solitude of his single-minded quest for gold dust. While there may be a grain of truth to these classic Hollywood stereotypes, it isn't a very big grain of truth. Many of the pioneers who settled the west were family groups. Many were immigrants. Many were major corporations. The big losers in the westward migration were Native Americans, who were killed or moved onto reservations. Not cool, American pioneers. Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. America’s Westward expansion was fueled by both Manifest Destiny and a desire to grow the nation and its resources — though at a cost: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/manifest-destiny As Americans continued to stream West on the name of Manifest Destiny, American Indians saw their lives changed forever as they moved from practising resistance to lives on reservations: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/from-resistance-to-reservations
Views: 2196421 CrashCourse
Colorado Experience: Ghost Towns
 
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According to the Colorado Springs Gazette, Colorado "has more than 1,000 ghost towns, over 600 of which have some sort of remains." Visit St. Elmo, Animas Forks, and Ashcroft, three of the best-preserved ghost towns in the state, and meet the spirits of Colorado's mining past.
Views: 18019 Rocky Mountain PBS
RESA's Change Your Life with Mining, Oil & Gas Careers
 
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Your guide to careers in mining, oil and gas careers in South Australia by RESA (Resources Engineering and Skills Alliance). Created by SACOME with support from RESA and DMITRE. The video features young men and women working if a wide cross section of the mining, oil and gas sector speaking frankly about their job and the sorts of things they work on. Suitable for classrooms, viewing at home or at tertiary level, the seven minute video has something for everyone.
Colorado Experience: Uranium Mania
 
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America's explosive successes in peace and war were fueled by the radioactive wealth from the Colorado Plateau. The mineral carnotite was a "Pandora's rock" of scientific, medical, industrial and military power for 20th Century America with its unleashed resources of radium, vanadium and uranium. Even though the energetic and frenetic mining and refining of uranium ore in Western Colorado has mostly ceased, its remaining trace elements of memory and controversy still radiate from Uravan and Grand Junction throughout the state, the nation and the world.
Views: 6260 Rocky Mountain PBS
Life in Central Appalachia has long been defined by the booms and busts of the coal industry. But ma
 
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THE HILLS ABOVE VERDA, KENTUCKY, ARE POCKMARKED WITH ABANDONED COAL MINES. MINERS LIKE STEVEN FIELDS ARE FEELING ABANDONED, TOO. SOUNDBITE (English), Steven Fields, Laid-Off Miner "They're not doing any hiring up here." FIELDS WAS MAKING TWENTY-FIVE-FIFTY AN HOUR UNTIL HE WAS LAID OFF FIVE YEARS AGO. HIS LAST JOB AT HIS FAMILY'S T-SHIRT PRINTING BUSINESS _ TEN BUCKS AN HOUR. SOUNDBITE (English), Steven Fields, Laid-Off Miner "A poor person can't make it around here." THE WAR TO UNIONIZE THE BOOMING MINES IN THE 1930S EARNED THIS PLACE THE NICKNAME `BLOODY HARLAN.' NOW, MANY HERE IN SOUTHEASTERN KENTUCKY ARE FIGHTING SIMPLY TO SURVIVE. IN THE PAST FIVE YEARS, HALF OF THE COAL JOBS IN EASTERN KENTUCKY HAVE VANISHED. SOME BLAME IT ON GOVERNMENT OVER-REGULATION, WHAT THEY CALL THE `WAR ON COAL.' OTHERS SAY IT'S COMPETITION FROM CHEAPER COAL SOURCES AND NATURAL GAS. EDDIE JONES WAS LAID OFF IN 2013. HIS UNEMPLOYMENT RAN OUT LAST DECEMBER. THE ONLY JOBS THAT PAY A HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE CLOSE TO A MINER'S SALARY ARE AWAY FROM HERE. SOUNDBITE (English), Eddie Jones, Laid-Off Miner "I'm agitated. And I'm frustrated. But, but I ain't no quitter." KEITH JOHNSON IS ONE OF THE LUCKY ONES. HE'S BLOWN THROUGH FORTY-THOUSAND DOLLARS IN RETIREMENT SAVINGS AND RACKED UP A TWENTY-THOUSAND DOLLAR HOSPITAL BILL. BETWEEN LAYOFFS AND SHUTDOWNS, HE WORKED AT FOUR DIFFERENT MINES IN THE PAST YEAR. BUT HE WAS WORKING. SOUNDBITE (English), Keith Johnson, Third-Generation Miner "A few years I would have said we had it made and we was going to live a long life and retire here ... But it's dim right now, yeah." JOHNSON MAY HAVE TO JOIN OTHERS WHO'VE MIGRATED TO WESTERN KENTUCKY, WHERE THE MINES ARE HUMMING. FIELDS ISN'T READY TO LEAVE HARLAN COUNTY OR COAL JUST YET. SOUNDBITE (English), Steven Fields, Laid-Off Miner "This is what's in my DNA. Coal mining. I miss it." DESPITE LUNG TROUBLE, FIELDS THINKS HE HAS ANOTHER TEN YEARS OF MINING LEFT IN HIM. THE QUESTION IS: HOW MANY MORE YEARS DOES COAL HAVE HERE? ALLEN BREED, ASSOCIATED PRESS, VERDA, KENTUCKY You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/63485315f78c8c3399bba82412047037 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 229 AP Archive
Wisconsin's sand mining boom
 
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Rich Budinger, president of the Wisconsin Industrial Sand Association, says hydraulic fracturing for natural gas is driving the high demand for Wisconsin sand.
Views: 177 WISN 12 News
Fly-in, fly-out putting social strain on miners
 
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Health professionals are warning the fly-in, fly-out culture is putting a enormous social strain on Australia's mining workforce.
Views: 1678 ABC News (Australia)
When the coal boom turned to bust
 
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Great segment from ABC's 7.30 Report, aired 15 October 2014. Original video here: http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2014/s4107903.htm
Views: 393 Leithvo
Ted Talks To: Australia's role in Global Lithium Supply Chain
 
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Consistent development of new technologies has led to a global growth in the demand for Lithium and battery minerals. From the world largest lithium mine in Western Australia, Ted Surette, KPMG's Industry Leader, Energy & Natural Resources, explores the production process of Lithium spodumene and Australia's role in the global lithium supply chain.
Views: 1092 KPMG Australia
Driving Downtown - Denver 4K - Colorado USA
 
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Driving Downtown - Denver Colorado USA - Episode 53. Starting Point: Colfax Avenue https://goo.gl/maps/oDaTW3Z8hiv . Denver is one of the fastest-growing major cities in the United States and is the capital and most populous municipality of the U.S. state of Colorado. Denver is just east of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Denver is nicknamed the Mile High City because its official elevation is exactly one mile (5280 feet or 1609.3 meters) above sea level, making it the highest major city in the United States.  With an estimated population of 693,060 in 2016, Denver is the 19th-most populous U.S. city, with a 15.48% increase since the 2010 United States Census.  In 2016, Denver was named the best place to live in the United States by U.S. News & World Report. Economy The Denver MSA has a gross metropolitan product of $157.6 billion in 2010, making it the 18th largest metro economy in the United States. Denver's economy is based partially on its geographic position and its connection to some of the country's major transportation systems. Because Denver is the largest city within 500 miles (800 km), it has become a natural location for storage and distribution of goods and services to the Mountain States, Southwest states, as well as all western states. Another benefit for distribution is that Denver is nearly equidistant from large cities of the Midwest, such as Chicago and St. Louis and some large cities of the West Coast, such as Los Angeles and San Francisco. Denver's position near the mineral-rich Rocky Mountains encouraged mining and energy companies to spring up in the area. In the early days of the city, gold and silver booms and busts played a large role in the city's economic success. In the 1970s and early 1980s, the energy crisis in America and resulting high oil prices created an energy boom in Denver captured in the soap opera Dynasty. Denver was built up considerably during this time with the construction of many new downtown skyscrapers. When the price of oil dropped from $34 a barrel in 1981 to $9 a barrel in 1986, the Denver economy also dropped, leaving almost 15,000 oil industry workers in the area unemployed (including former mayor and current governor John Hickenlooper, a former geologist), and the nation's highest office vacancy rate (30%). The industry has recovered and the region has 700 employed petroleum engineers.[86] Advances in hydraulic fracturing have made the DJ Basin of Colorado into an accessible and lucrative oil play. Energy and mining are still important in Denver's economy today, with companies such as EnCana, Halliburton, Smith International, Rio Tinto Group, Newmont Mining, Noble Energy, and Anadarko headquartered or having significant operations. Sports Denver is home to a variety of sports teams and is one of the U.S. cities with teams from four major sports (the Denver metro area is the smallest metropolitan area to have a team in all four major sports). The Denver Broncos of the National Football League have drawn crowds of over 70,000 since their origins in the early 1960s, and continue to draw fans today to their current home Sports Authority Field at Mile High. The Broncos have sold out every home game (except for strike-replacement games) since 1970. The Broncos have advanced to eight Super Bowls and won back-to-back titles in 1997 and 1998, and won again in 2015. Culture Because of its proximity to the mountains and generally sunny weather, Denver has gained a reputation as being a very active, outdoor-oriented city. Many Denver residents spend the weekends in the mountains; skiing in the winter and hiking, climbing, kayaking, and camping in the summer. Denver and surrounding cities are home to a large number of local and national breweries. Many of the region's restaurants have on-site breweries, and some larger brewers offer tours, including Coors and New Belgium Brewing Company. The city also welcomes visitors from around the world when it hosts the annual Great American Beer Festival each fall. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denver
Views: 124541 J Utah
video9
 
00:42
http://www.investing-in-property.com.au The Surat Basin --Australia's Clean Energy Capital A wave of transformation is breathing life and economic vibrancy into regional centres across the country, with around $270bn in energy projects currently planned or underway. All of this activity in the resources sector is igniting a property boom in hub towns such as Chinchilla, Roma and Miles in the Surat Basin, and savvy property investors are set to benefit. These billion-dollar projects are designed to help meet the soaring global demand for liquefied natural gas (LNG), the emerging clean placement fuel for coal, and coal itself. This demand is coming predominantly from international export destinations in Asia, and more specifically China, which is experiencing the largest mass urbanization in history. Infrastructure hot-spotting expert Flynn De Freitas from Omega Investments predicts that over the next ten years, the number of large or tiered cities in China will increase by 37, to 143 cities of at least a million people. Clearly, international demand -- along with Australia's own domestic energy needs -- isn't expected to slow any time soon. While all of this activity is all good news for the Australian economy, it also represents an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for property investors to secure high rents and strong capital growth in one hit. De Freitas has been charting the property prospects of the Surat Basin for some time, and he believes the local real estate market offers strong returns to investors willing to take the plunge. "The unique and vital nature of the energy industry presents property investors with an opportunity to invest in Australia's new energy towns," he says. "These are towns where a social contract between the energy industry, government and local communities means that the billions of dollars in infrastructure investment by the energy industry is matched by millions of dollars in government social investment in local communities." De Freitas says these social investments makes these communities more liveable and attractive for workers within the energy industry, which ultimately ensures that property investors enjoy sustainable, long term property growth -- thereby avoiding the boom/bust risks of mining boom towns. The Surat Basin has been dubbed by some as Australia's future energy hub, with the emerging Energy Town of Chinchilla set to benefit from an impressive array of planned infrastructure projects worth billions of dollars. Two of the largest infrastructure projects in the Surat Basin are the $15bn Queensland Curtis Island Liquefied Natural Gas (QCLNG) and the $20bn Australia Pacific Liquefied Natural Gas (APLNL) projects, which have both commenced construction. They will involve a peak construction workforce of 6,500 in the Chinchilla region, dropping to a low of 1,400 over a four-year period. "The Chinchilla property market has already been richly rewarded by the energy industry, with the 2004-2006 construction 25km away of the Kogan Creek Power Station, which entailed 1,000 construction workers and 300 operational workers, virtually all located in Chinchilla," he says. "This $1.2bn energy project saw annual median property values rise by over 20% for three straight years... and contributed to the 11.9% average annual growth rate over the last 10 years to 2011." De Freitas says these phenomenal growth rates "all now look to be superseded" by the QCLNG and APLNG projects. "Given the impact of one single $1.2bn project, the next decade of growth for Chinchill's property market looks very favourable indeed." For more information visit us at http://www.investing-in-property.com.au
Views: 1428 Bruce Graham
Fairfax Ghost Town Bridge
 
00:56
It's fair to say that Fairfax is not easy to find - in fact many hikers have never heard of this ghost town in the Carbon River valley outside the Carbon River Entrance of Mount Rainier National Park. Fairfax and neighboring Melmont are two mining towns that sprung up in the late 19th and early 20th centuries when coal was discovered in the foothills. Both town sites are nestled between the Carbon River and foothills outside Mount Rainier National Park. Fairfax was platted in the late 1890s when the Northern Pacific Railway extended its line from Carbonado to Fairfax (the historic bridge over the Carbon River south of Carbonado is named for Fairfax). In addition to coal deposits there was also a lumber mill, the Manley-Moor Lumber Company, nearby that employed over 200 men. Like many mining towns Fairfax was a "melting pot." At Christmas miners took up collections to purchase Christmas presents for every child in town and baseball was a passion for all ages and ethnicities in summer. By the early 1900s coking ovens were producing more than 250,000 tons of coal per month and as the population grew so did the demand for coal. Until 1921, access to Fairfax was only by rail or horse (in 1921 Pierce County extended the road over the Carbon River and into Fairfax). However, in just over 20 years the town went from boom to bust -- the demand for coal dropped as oil and gasoline were increasingly used to meet energy needs. Houses were abandoned or salvaged and by1941 Fairfax was a ghost town. Pierce County retained the lands until 2002 - then the county set aside several hundred acres as open space for the public. Encroaching forest, floods and fires also took a toll on the town. The Fairfax Hotel and school burned down and the Carbon River railroad bridge washed away. Today only a few pillars from some of the mine buildings remain and purportedly coke ovens (which we did not find). We did find the site of the railroad turntable indicated by a center post. Getting to Fairfax is an adventure. The hike begins on a decommissioned road (closed to vehicles) a couple miles south of the Fairfax Bridge (see getting there for details). In addition to ditches and berms you'll also encounter a few downed trees and boggy areas that spill out across the road during the rainy seasons - sturdy boots are strongly suggested. As the road levels off in the valley it becomes more difficult to follow. As vegetation leafs out in the summer, you may have to navigate the old-fashioned way, by lay of the land. Once you are at the level of the valley the road fades to a slight indentation through a large, grassy meadow where a few, lichen-encrusted fruit trees still cling to life: This is Upper Fairfax (Lower Fairfax is on the other side of the river). Our major discovery was finding the Fairfax swimming pool (you'll find it by staying on the track through the meadow). The pool is huge, at least by "artifact" standards. The foundations of the pool are intact as are the moss-covered steps leading down into the pool (the pool was inside the school house). We looked for abutments of the railroad bridge that spanned the Carbon River when the railroad ran between Carbonado (where coal was processed in the early 1900s) and Fairfax. The remains of the railroad bridge and coke ovens eluded us; after several tries we had to call it a day. Even if you don't find any artifacts, the meadow is an idyllic place to sit and listen to the whispers of the Carbon River and ponder what it might have been like to live and work here a hundred years ago or so. Today it is a quiet place, a setting of abandoned apple trees, grasses, ferns, wild roses, orchids and trilliums; in the fall you'll also find mushrooms. You will certainly discover as did we that one visit is not enough. Getting to Fairfax - From Wilkeson/Carbonado continue on route State Route 165 toward the Carbon River entrance of Mount Rainier National Park (go mid-week if possible as parking is limited). About a half mile past the Fairfax Bridge turn left at the split in the road onto the Carbon River Road. Continue a scant two miles to where you will see several large boulders just off the road (left). Park in the small pullout there and walk down the road to the meadow, then head north (left). Explore. As always - if you do encounter private property signs do not trespass. Refer to the site below (Ghost Towns of Washington) for their "Code of Ethics" which should apply to anyone interested in exploring ghost towns.
Views: 1356 Manuel Rincon
Big banks bust, small banks boom amid EU crisis
 
03:05
When it comes to banking, bigger isn't always better. While the EU is struggling to beef up its ailing financial institutions, Europe's smallest banks have been doing pretty well - some run by just one member of staff. RT's Peter Oliver traveled to a small German village to meet one such banker. RT LIVE http://rt.com/on-air Subscribe to RT! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RussiaToday Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTnews Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_com Follow us on Instagram http://instagram.com/rt Follow us on Google+ http://plus.google.com/+RT RT (Russia Today) is a global news network broadcasting from Moscow and Washington studios. RT is the first news channel to break the 1 billion YouTube views benchmark.
Views: 7075 RT
Pressha - Splackavellie
 
04:20
Pressha's official music video for 'Splackavellie'. Click to listen to Pressha on Spotify: http://smarturl.it/PRSpot?IQid=PreSP As featured on Don't Get It Twisted. Click to buy the track or album via iTunes: http://smarturl.it/PRGITiTunes?IQid=PreSP Google Play: http://smarturl.it/PRSPlay?IQid=PreSP Amazon: http://smarturl.it/PGITAm?IQid=PreSP Subscribe to Pressha on YouTube: http://smarturl.it/PRSub?IQid=PreSP More great Classic R&B videos here: http://smarturl.it/ClassicRNB?IQid=PreSP --------- Lyrics: He aint ya boyfriend He aint ya husband Just sumbody u can call when your body needs a fix He'll put u in tha mix Den youll hear him askin whats my name say my name Splackavellie Every woman needs here own Splackavellie A brotha she can call when her man aint doin her right He can work it all night Until tha morning light Make her feel right right right Every woman needs that one Splackavellie A brotha she can call when her man aint doin her right He can work it all night Until tha morning light Make her feel right right right
Views: 3274958 PresshaVEVO
"Remembering Columbia Gardens" (1999)
 
59:41
REMEMBERING THE COLUMBIA GARDENS, directed by Ray Ekness This film celebrates the now-vanished Columbia Gardens in Butte, Montana. - in business from 1899-1973 - in home movies, pictures, and first-hand accounts of people who enjoyed the rollercoaster, the carousel, the biplanes, the cowboy swings. ABOUT THE FILMMAKER Ray Ekness has worked and taught at The University of Montana since 1989. He was a professor for the Radio-TV Department while he was a television producer at UM's Broadcast Media Center. He joined the school's permanent faculty in 1998, and was department chair from 2004-2011. He has produced programs about subjects ranging from sports, dance, history and culture to travel, politics, news and public affairs. He continues to produce segments for the award-winning Montana PBS television series "Backroads of Montana., which has been nominated for five regional Emmy Awards. Learn more about MontanaPBS at http://montanapbs.org. Follow THE MONTANA EXPERIENCE on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/themontanaexperience/ Subscribe to THE MONTANA EXPERIENCE https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_Psw3TOXXGULurBj5mtofQ Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/MontanaFilms
S Africa mine workers demand higher wages
 
01:58
Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Negotiations about wages in South Africa's gold sector are getting underway. Some unions are demanding sharp increases of up to 150 percent, but mining executives say their demands are unrealistic. Al Jazeera's Tania Page reports from Johannesburg. At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts
Views: 1867 Al Jazeera English
DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince - Girls Ain't Nothing But Trouble
 
04:43
DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince's official music video for 'Girls Ain't Nothing But Trouble'. Click to listen to DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince on Spotify: http://smarturl.it/JFPSpot?IQid=JFPGT As featured on Greatest Hits. Click to buy the track or album via iTunes: http://smarturl.it/JFPGHiTunes?IQid=JFPGT Google Play: http://smarturl.it/DJJPlay?IQid=JFPGT Amazon: http://smarturl.it/JFPGHAm?IQid=JFPGT More From DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince Summertime: https://youtu.be/Kr0tTbTbmVA The Things That U Do: https://youtu.be/Qmv2gt4Su4o Parents Just Don't Understand: https://youtu.be/jW3PFC86UNI More great Classic Hip Hop Videos here: http://smarturl.it/CHHPlaylist?IQid=JFPGT Follow DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince Website: http://www.djjazzyjeff.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/djjazzyjeff?_rdr=p Twitter: https://twitter.com/djjazzyjeff215 Instagram: https://instagram.com/djjazzyjeff/ Myspace: https://myspace.com/djjazzyjeff Subscribe to DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince on YouTube: http://smarturl.it/JFPSub?IQid=JFPGT --------- Lyrics: Listen homeboys don't mean to bust your bubble But girls of the world ain't nothing but trouble So next time a girl gives you the play Just remember my rhyme and get the hell away Just last week when I was walking down the street I observed this lovely lady that I wanted to meet I walked up to her I said hello She said you're kind of cute I said yes I know But by the way sweetheart what's your name She said my friends like to call me exotic Elaine I said my name is the Prince and she said why I said well I don't know I'm just a hell of a guy But enough about me yo let's talk about you And all the wonderful things that you and I can do I popped some cash and in a little bit of time I showed some cash and the girl was mine I took her over town I wined her and dined her She ask me did I like her I said well kinda All of a sudden she jumped out her seat
Views: 2586333 DJJazzyJeffVEVO
Heather Parry - This is our Story - Cinema ad
 
02:01
Australian mining means a lot to Australia. It supports our country, provides thousands of jobs - and is filled with great people. This is Heather Parry's story See more stories at: ‪http://www.thisisourstory.com.au/‬ --- You wouldn't expect a woman who passionately studied art at school to become a qualified Civil Engineer. But that's exactly what you can expect from Heather Parry. She's a woman of many talents who takes multitasking to a whole new level: she's a devoted mother, accredited Pony Club Instructor and keen renovator, who breeds and trains horses and regularly musters cattle for friends. Heather is also the Project Manager for Leighton Contractors at the $299 million Dawson North Mine Project in Central Queensland, where she's accountable for a safe, efficient, on-budget mining operation. Throughout school Heather's mother warned her about the lack of jobs in the artistic field. But for a woman who can think creatively, there are plenty of jobs in Australia's mining industry. As Project Manager, Heather's role is a crucial one that entails supervising a multidisciplinary project team of over 150 personnel. What she accomplished last year was a work of art, as constant floods wreaked havoc throughout the state. "I really did wonder: how am I going to lead my group out of this one?" she admits. But with that imaginative head on her shoulders, Heather and her team managed to find the right solutions and strategies to get through those difficult times. Heather's story started from a humble upbringing. Originally from NSW, Heather was raised by her mum, as one of four kids. She went on to complete a Bachelor of Civil Engineering at the University of Newcastle and worked in construction before moving to Queensland. After completing several construction projects for mine sites, she secured a job in mining because, she says, "mining is a rare industry that allows professionals to live in the bush and lead a really fulfilling career". Heather now actively campaigns for the recruitment and retention of women in the resources sector, with her operation boasting almost 20 per cent women in operator roles and 30 per cent women on the project team. She's particularly excited about the numerous family-friendly roles available for stay-at-home mums who have kids at school, and sees these women as potentially being "an enormous asset" to her team. Over the next 10 years it will be vital to encourage women to enter and remain in the mining sector, as literally thousands of people are required to support the expansion of the mining industry in Queensland. In fact, the Queensland Resources Council is actively looking to "increase the proportion of women as operators, engineers, geologists and senior management". "It's definitely a passion of mine to enable women to get into the mining industry," Heather says. "There's a wide spectrum of jobs available that would suit women who are either unemployed or underemployed." It's this kind of attitude that won Heather the Queensland Resources Award for Women. But Heather doesn't think of herself as a role model for women, she just gets on with life -- whether she's instructing her staff at the mine or a horse at her daughter's Pony Club. "Horses are good teachers for management because if you're not fair to a horse it responds badly, and it's the same with management." Heather may not exactly be a horse whisperer, but her voice in the mining industry can be heard loud and clear. And Heather Parry is just one of many women trailblazing a path for the Australian women who are destined to become leaders in our mining industry.
Views: 11248 AusMiningStory
Food Boom Or Bust
 
01:56
#GoranRoos presents how #SouthAustralia has a golden opportunity to engineer a #FoodBoom. But will it be a bust, like the #MiningBoom was for others? #ImpactAwards #GlobaliseSA
Views: 178 The Impact Awards
video7
 
01:05
http://www.investing-in-property.com.au The Surat Basin --Australia's Clean Energy Capital A wave of transformation is breathing life and economic vibrancy into regional centres across the country, with around $270bn in energy projects currently planned or underway. All of this activity in the resources sector is igniting a property boom in hub towns such as Chinchilla, Roma and Miles in the Surat Basin, and savvy property investors are set to benefit. These billion-dollar projects are designed to help meet the soaring global demand for liquefied natural gas (LNG), the emerging clean placement fuel for coal, and coal itself. This demand is coming predominantly from international export destinations in Asia, and more specifically China, which is experiencing the largest mass urbanization in history. Infrastructure hot-spotting expert Flynn De Freitas from Omega Investments predicts that over the next ten years, the number of large or tiered cities in China will increase by 37, to 143 cities of at least a million people. Clearly, international demand -- along with Australia's own domestic energy needs -- isn't expected to slow any time soon. While all of this activity is all good news for the Australian economy, it also represents an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for property investors to secure high rents and strong capital growth in one hit. De Freitas has been charting the property prospects of the Surat Basin for some time, and he believes the local real estate market offers strong returns to investors willing to take the plunge. "The unique and vital nature of the energy industry presents property investors with an opportunity to invest in Australia's new energy towns," he says. "These are towns where a social contract between the energy industry, government and local communities means that the billions of dollars in infrastructure investment by the energy industry is matched by millions of dollars in government social investment in local communities." De Freitas says these social investments makes these communities more liveable and attractive for workers within the energy industry, which ultimately ensures that property investors enjoy sustainable, long term property growth -- thereby avoiding the boom/bust risks of mining boom towns. The Surat Basin has been dubbed by some as Australia's future energy hub, with the emerging Energy Town of Chinchilla set to benefit from an impressive array of planned infrastructure projects worth billions of dollars. Two of the largest infrastructure projects in the Surat Basin are the $15bn Queensland Curtis Island Liquefied Natural Gas (QCLNG) and the $20bn Australia Pacific Liquefied Natural Gas (APLNL) projects, which have both commenced construction. They will involve a peak construction workforce of 6,500 in the Chinchilla region, dropping to a low of 1,400 over a four-year period. "The Chinchilla property market has already been richly rewarded by the energy industry, with the 2004-2006 construction 25km away of the Kogan Creek Power Station, which entailed 1,000 construction workers and 300 operational workers, virtually all located in Chinchilla," he says. "This $1.2bn energy project saw annual median property values rise by over 20% for three straight years... and contributed to the 11.9% average annual growth rate over the last 10 years to 2011." De Freitas says these phenomenal growth rates "all now look to be superseded" by the QCLNG and APLNG projects. "Given the impact of one single $1.2bn project, the next decade of growth for Chinchill's property market looks very favourable indeed." For more information visit us at http://www.investing-in-property.com.au
Views: 181 Bruce Graham
Mining Potential Still Strong In Australia - RBS Morgans on Kitco News
 
06:54
Kitco News speaks with James Wilson of RBS Morgans about mining news specifically in Australia. Mining companies in Australia are struggling to be profitable due to lower metals prices, higher costs and lack of funding. "Now States are considering potentially increasing royalties in some of the gold companies," Wilson says when asked about political issues in Australia. "That has put a bit of a scare amongst the local gold companies." With regards to exploration in the country, Wilson says that companies are now focusing on making every drill hole count. "We've seen a number of high profile CEOs depart a number of big mining companies in the past 12 months," Wilson adds. "Newcrest had over 4 or 5 production downgrades in the last few years and multibillion dollar write-downs, so the CEO departure is the icing on the cake." Tune in now to hear more about the mining industry and what mining companies are focusing on to push forward. Kitco News, October 16, 2013. Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitcomm.com -- Or join the conversation on social media: @KitcoNewsNOW on Twitter: http://twitter.com/kitconews --- Kitco News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/kitconews --- Kitco News on Google+: http://google.com/+kitco --- Kitco News on StockTwits: http://stocktwits.com/kitconews
Views: 633 Kitco NEWS
The boom and the bust
 
06:08
While many people are benefiting from Western Australia's booming economy, welfare agencies warn that the high cost of living is making it hard for people to make ends meet and there is an increase in the number of people facing homelessness.
video18
 
01:32
http://www.investing-in-property.com.au The Surat Basin --Australia's Clean Energy Capital A wave of transformation is breathing life and economic vibrancy into regional centres across the country, with around $270bn in energy projects currently planned or underway. All of this activity in the resources sector is igniting a property boom in hub towns such as Chinchilla, Roma and Miles in the Surat Basin, and savvy property investors are set to benefit. These billion-dollar projects are designed to help meet the soaring global demand for liquefied natural gas (LNG), the emerging clean placement fuel for coal, and coal itself. This demand is coming predominantly from international export destinations in Asia, and more specifically China, which is experiencing the largest mass urbanization in history. Infrastructure hot-spotting expert Flynn De Freitas from Omega Investments predicts that over the next ten years, the number of large or tiered cities in China will increase by 37, to 143 cities of at least a million people. Clearly, international demand -- along with Australia's own domestic energy needs -- isn't expected to slow any time soon. While all of this activity is all good news for the Australian economy, it also represents an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for property investors to secure high rents and strong capital growth in one hit. De Freitas has been charting the property prospects of the Surat Basin for some time, and he believes the local real estate market offers strong returns to investors willing to take the plunge. "The unique and vital nature of the energy industry presents property investors with an opportunity to invest in Australia's new energy towns," he says. "These are towns where a social contract between the energy industry, government and local communities means that the billions of dollars in infrastructure investment by the energy industry is matched by millions of dollars in government social investment in local communities." De Freitas says these social investments makes these communities more liveable and attractive for workers within the energy industry, which ultimately ensures that property investors enjoy sustainable, long term property growth -- thereby avoiding the boom/bust risks of mining boom towns. The Surat Basin has been dubbed by some as Australia's future energy hub, with the emerging Energy Town of Chinchilla set to benefit from an impressive array of planned infrastructure projects worth billions of dollars. Two of the largest infrastructure projects in the Surat Basin are the $15bn Queensland Curtis Island Liquefied Natural Gas (QCLNG) and the $20bn Australia Pacific Liquefied Natural Gas (APLNL) projects, which have both commenced construction. They will involve a peak construction workforce of 6,500 in the Chinchilla region, dropping to a low of 1,400 over a four-year period. "The Chinchilla property market has already been richly rewarded by the energy industry, with the 2004-2006 construction 25km away of the Kogan Creek Power Station, which entailed 1,000 construction workers and 300 operational workers, virtually all located in Chinchilla," he says. "This $1.2bn energy project saw annual median property values rise by over 20% for three straight years... and contributed to the 11.9% average annual growth rate over the last 10 years to 2011." De Freitas says these phenomenal growth rates "all now look to be superseded" by the QCLNG and APLNG projects. "Given the impact of one single $1.2bn project, the next decade of growth for Chinchill's property market looks very favourable indeed." For more information visit us at http://www.investing-in-property.com.au
Views: 150 Bruce Graham
Over Wyoming
 
58:28
WyomingPBS takes cameras aloft to explore the sweeping beauty of the Cowboy State and finds etched on the land, history as vast as its horizons and human stories as intricate as its streams. Narrated by Pete Simpson.
Views: 867227 Wyoming PBS
Westside Connection - Bow Down
 
03:27
From: Bow Down Lyrics: [ICE CUBE] Tha world is mine nigga get back Dont fuck with my stack the gage is racked About to drop the bomb Iam tha motherfuckin don Big fish in a small pond Now tha feds wanna throw the book at the crook But I shook they worm and they hook Guppies hold they breath they wanna miss me When Iam tipsey Runnin everything WEST of the Mississippi Its the unseen pullin strings wit my pinky ring We got your woman so pucker up FO we fuck her up Bow down before I make a phone call Got 25 niggaz runnin up on ya'll Fo the cheese we want them keys Everybody freeze on ya knees butt naked please Before any of you guppies get heart Nigga rewind my part and....(Bow Down) [MACK 10] I take ten steps and I draw Now who's dissin the mad ass Inglewood Addition I bust like a pimple my mind is illmental The Westside connects with me and south central And a drag from tha zig zag cant fuck with the Philly's Holdin down tha wild west like a kid they Call Billy Once again it's Mack 10 the gold crown holda Strong as a Coca-Cola with a crome pistola Now who wanna fuss so I can buss when I cuss My look bring you fear with gear deom the Surplus Since a teen I chased tha green the crack scene King- Lolos Cornishes and Bagguetts on my peices So reconize these real G's take the cheese The WESTSIDE CONNECTION keep it rollin like gold D's Three Wheelin and Dealin is like tha California Style But in tha mean while in my town you got to BOW [Hook] Bow Down when you come to my town Bow down when we west-ward bound cuz We aint no haters like you Bow Down to some nigga's that's greater than You [End Hook] [W.C.] Well it's that chuck wearin still sportin a Beanie the shadiest Nigga in the click who want to see me as I slide My locs on let My khakis hang WESTSIDE CONNECT gang bing bing Bang run away run Away or get yo punk ass sprayed by this H double O to D to the S.T.A fuck hidin it iam gang related simple and Plain which Means I culd give a fuck about you nigga's in The rap game Flashy nigga's get stuck up beat the fuck up when You come around Keep your chain tucked from this zero zero's Affiliated fuck a Studio lyricist I'm real with this talk the talk Walk the walk Dis me on WAX and Iam tryin to saw your whole fuckin Head off Nigga I'm platium bond so bitch shut up punk all yahh Could kiss my converse like sh'o nuff.... [Hook] [ICE CUBE--Spoken] (Yea lemme tell you sumthin) (gangsta's make the world go round) (you aint gotta clown) (But if you livin on tha WEST SIDE of yo town) (Make them other fool's BOW DOWN)
Views: 3108117 Highwire
The Towns of Boca Raton & Delray Beach | On The Town in The Palm Beaches
 
26:47
We explore a tale of two cities. These neighboring coastal towns are full of charm and creativity. In Boca Raton, we’ll take a nostalgic train ride through the city’s history… and bust a move, as we take on a ballroom dance challenge…. And no wonder Delray Beach was voted the most fun small town in America -- we’ll visit a spot for vintage arcade games and indulge in the ultimate comfort food…. I’m Frank Licari, join me as we go On the Town in the Palm Beaches.
Views: 1729 South Florida PBS
Hush | Critical Role | Campaign 2, Episode 7
 
04:30:28
The group plunges deeper into the gnoll mines, coming across an unexpected ally (guest Khary Payton), and wandering into a nest of dangers... Watch Critical Role Live Thursdays at 7pm PST on Twitch at https://www.twitch.tv/geekandsundry Thanks to D&D Beyond for sponsoring this episode of Critical Role! Check out https://www.dndbeyond.com for all of your D&D digital toolset needs! You can pick up Critical Role merch at http://shop.geekandsundry.com For more RPGs we love, go to http://bit.ly/GS_RPG Follow the cast of Critical Role on Twitter! Ashley: https://twitter.com/TheVulcanSalute Laura: https://twitter.com/LauraBaileyVO Liam: https://twitter.com/VoiceOfOBrien Matthew: https://twitter.com/matthewmercer Marisha: https://twitter.com/Marisha_Ray Taliesin: https://twitter.com/executivegoth Travis: https://twitter.com/WillingBlam Sam: https://twitter.com/samriegel Visit us on http://geekandsundry.com Subscribe to Geek and Sundry: http://goo.gl/B62jl Join our community at: http://geekandsundry.com/community Twitter: http://twitter.com/geekandsundry Facebook: http://facebook.com/geekandsundry Instagram: http://instagram.com/geekandsundry Thanks to @CRTranscript and all the critters for closed captions!
Views: 1878073 Geek & Sundry
Resources boom to drive economic change
 
00:26
Reserve Bank governor Glenn Stevens has said the resources boom will see a structure change in the Australian economy.
Obama: Some jobs 'are just not going to come back'
 
05:23
A steel worker union official asked President Barack Obama at a June 1 town hall in Elkhart, Indiana, about job losses at a plant run by Carrier, an air conditioning manufacturer that recently announced plans to move jobs from Indiana to Mexico. He replied that some jobs "are just not going to come back," while others are in flux or rebounding.
Views: 656856 PBS NewsHour
Australian towns battle flooding after cyclone
 
01:00
Downgraded Cyclone Debbie continues to pack damaging gusts and dump huge amounts of rain all the way down the east coast to New South Wales state, south of Queensland, and Sydney.
Views: 494 AFP news agency
video12
 
00:34
http://www.investing-in-property.com.au The Surat Basin --Australia's Clean Energy Capital A wave of transformation is breathing life and economic vibrancy into regional centres across the country, with around $270bn in energy projects currently planned or underway. All of this activity in the resources sector is igniting a property boom in hub towns such as Chinchilla, Roma and Miles in the Surat Basin, and savvy property investors are set to benefit. These billion-dollar projects are designed to help meet the soaring global demand for liquefied natural gas (LNG), the emerging clean placement fuel for coal, and coal itself. This demand is coming predominantly from international export destinations in Asia, and more specifically China, which is experiencing the largest mass urbanization in history. Infrastructure hot-spotting expert Flynn De Freitas from Omega Investments predicts that over the next ten years, the number of large or tiered cities in China will increase by 37, to 143 cities of at least a million people. Clearly, international demand -- along with Australia's own domestic energy needs -- isn't expected to slow any time soon. While all of this activity is all good news for the Australian economy, it also represents an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for property investors to secure high rents and strong capital growth in one hit. De Freitas has been charting the property prospects of the Surat Basin for some time, and he believes the local real estate market offers strong returns to investors willing to take the plunge. "The unique and vital nature of the energy industry presents property investors with an opportunity to invest in Australia's new energy towns," he says. "These are towns where a social contract between the energy industry, government and local communities means that the billions of dollars in infrastructure investment by the energy industry is matched by millions of dollars in government social investment in local communities." De Freitas says these social investments makes these communities more liveable and attractive for workers within the energy industry, which ultimately ensures that property investors enjoy sustainable, long term property growth -- thereby avoiding the boom/bust risks of mining boom towns. The Surat Basin has been dubbed by some as Australia's future energy hub, with the emerging Energy Town of Chinchilla set to benefit from an impressive array of planned infrastructure projects worth billions of dollars. Two of the largest infrastructure projects in the Surat Basin are the $15bn Queensland Curtis Island Liquefied Natural Gas (QCLNG) and the $20bn Australia Pacific Liquefied Natural Gas (APLNL) projects, which have both commenced construction. They will involve a peak construction workforce of 6,500 in the Chinchilla region, dropping to a low of 1,400 over a four-year period. "The Chinchilla property market has already been richly rewarded by the energy industry, with the 2004-2006 construction 25km away of the Kogan Creek Power Station, which entailed 1,000 construction workers and 300 operational workers, virtually all located in Chinchilla," he says. "This $1.2bn energy project saw annual median property values rise by over 20% for three straight years... and contributed to the 11.9% average annual growth rate over the last 10 years to 2011." De Freitas says these phenomenal growth rates "all now look to be superseded" by the QCLNG and APLNG projects. "Given the impact of one single $1.2bn project, the next decade of growth for Chinchill's property market looks very favourable indeed." For more information visit us at http://www.investing-in-property.com.au
Views: 16 Bruce Graham
video3
 
01:19
http://www.investing-in-property.com.au The Surat Basin --Australia's Clean Energy Capital A wave of transformation is breathing life and economic vibrancy into regional centres across the country, with around $270bn in energy projects currently planned or underway. All of this activity in the resources sector is igniting a property boom in hub towns such as Chinchilla, Roma and Miles in the Surat Basin, and savvy property investors are set to benefit. These billion-dollar projects are designed to help meet the soaring global demand for liquefied natural gas (LNG), the emerging clean placement fuel for coal, and coal itself. This demand is coming predominantly from international export destinations in Asia, and more specifically China, which is experiencing the largest mass urbanization in history. Infrastructure hot-spotting expert Flynn De Freitas from Omega Investments predicts that over the next ten years, the number of large or tiered cities in China will increase by 37, to 143 cities of at least a million people. Clearly, international demand -- along with Australia's own domestic energy needs -- isn't expected to slow any time soon. While all of this activity is all good news for the Australian economy, it also represents an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for property investors to secure high rents and strong capital growth in one hit. De Freitas has been charting the property prospects of the Surat Basin for some time, and he believes the local real estate market offers strong returns to investors willing to take the plunge. "The unique and vital nature of the energy industry presents property investors with an opportunity to invest in Australia's new energy towns," he says. "These are towns where a social contract between the energy industry, government and local communities means that the billions of dollars in infrastructure investment by the energy industry is matched by millions of dollars in government social investment in local communities." De Freitas says these social investments makes these communities more liveable and attractive for workers within the energy industry, which ultimately ensures that property investors enjoy sustainable, long term property growth -- thereby avoiding the boom/bust risks of mining boom towns. The Surat Basin has been dubbed by some as Australia's future energy hub, with the emerging Energy Town of Chinchilla set to benefit from an impressive array of planned infrastructure projects worth billions of dollars. Two of the largest infrastructure projects in the Surat Basin are the $15bn Queensland Curtis Island Liquefied Natural Gas (QCLNG) and the $20bn Australia Pacific Liquefied Natural Gas (APLNL) projects, which have both commenced construction. They will involve a peak construction workforce of 6,500 in the Chinchilla region, dropping to a low of 1,400 over a four-year period. "The Chinchilla property market has already been richly rewarded by the energy industry, with the 2004-2006 construction 25km away of the Kogan Creek Power Station, which entailed 1,000 construction workers and 300 operational workers, virtually all located in Chinchilla," he says. "This $1.2bn energy project saw annual median property values rise by over 20% for three straight years... and contributed to the 11.9% average annual growth rate over the last 10 years to 2011." De Freitas says these phenomenal growth rates "all now look to be superseded" by the QCLNG and APLNG projects. "Given the impact of one single $1.2bn project, the next decade of growth for Chinchill's property market looks very favourable indeed." For more information visit us at http://www.investing-in-property.com.au
Views: 34 Bruce Graham

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