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Conflict Minerals, Rebels and Child Soldiers in Congo
 
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Warlords, soldiers, and child laborers all toil over a mineral you've never even heard of. Coltan is a conflict mineral in nearly every cell phone, laptop, and electronic device. It's also tied to the deaths of over 5 million people in Congo since 1990. Hosted by Alison Suroosh Alvi | Originally released in 2011 at http://vice.com Click here to help: http://www.raisehopeforcongo.org/ Watch more VICE documentaries here: http://bit.ly/VICE-Presents Subscribe for videos that are actually good: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/vice/videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com
Views: 3297117 VICE
Smartphones: The world in your pocket - The Congolese Blood in your hand
 
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Google, Apple, Intel and other tech companies revealed that minerals sold to fund combattants in the Democratic Republic of Congo and nearby countries may be used in the manufacture of their gadgets. Everyday its an emergency in east of Congo due to crisis war and sexual violence. The disclosures come thanks to the reform-focused Dodd-Frank Act, which now requires thousands of companies to release an annual report detailing the use of so-called conflict minerals. Tungsten, tin, tantalum and gold-products common in electronics and known collectively as "3TG" are mined heavily in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and other central African countries. Proceeds from some of the mines are used to fun an ongoing war that's become the deadliest armed conflict since World War 2, according to one study. However, because such materials travel through a variety of smelters, manufacturersand distributors before they end up in a phone or laptop, vetting the entire manufacturing line is a difficult, expensive process. The SEC has estimated that compliance with the new rule cost companies $3 to $4 billion in the first year and will cost $206 to $609 million in subsequent years. In regulatory filings, the tech giants continuously said they did not have sufficient data to fully determine whether conflict minerals were present in their products. Google wrote in its filing that "based on our due diligence, we have reason to believe that portion of the 3TG used in our products originated from the covered countries, but we have not identified any instances of sourcing that directly or indirectly supported conflict in the covered countries". The company disclosed that about 36 percent of its smelters in the Democratic republic of the Congo region have been certified as not trafficking in conflict minerals, but it could notmake a firm determination about other suppliers. Apple, which began tracking the practices of individual smelters in 2010, said that 80 percent of the smelters it does business with in the region do not use conflict minerals. But like Google, Apple said it did not know enough to definitively say whether the other suppliers use them. Intel, meanwhile, said that its microprocessors and chipsets are conflict-free, but it could not determine the conflict status of its other products. And Amazon said "majority" of the suppliers that contribute to its kindle pipeline are not using conflict minerals. Every company which made a disclosure said they would pressure their questionable suppliers to be certified as compliant with conflict-free standards. overall, the reports indicate that tech companies are at least advocating for the manufacture of conflict-free products, but they are finding it difficult to implement such initiatives on a practical level. No ones is keen on abandoning the region entirely-despite raised awareness of conflict minerals, the Democratic Republic of the Congo's share of tantalum production actually increased in 2013, according to the Wall street Journal. Some companies even argue that continuing to draw minerals from the region could allow them to be a force for good. "Rather than simply funneling its demand through a limited number of verified smelters or those that are not sourcing in the Democratic Republic of the Congo," Apple wrote, "Apple believes the best way to impact human rights abuses on the ground in the Democratic Republic of Congo is to have critical mass of smelters verified as conflict-free, so that demand from other questionable sources is reduced."
Views: 29317 MUKELENGE
Conflict Cell Phones - The Horror We Are All Responsible For - Conspiracy Files
 
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Conflict cellphones are casuing a war in the Congo that every one of us is responsible for. A nearly two decade long war in the eastern Congo has been the deadliest in the world since World War II. That means worse than Korea, Vietnam, all the conflicts the Middle East. Why don't we ever hear anything about it? Why the cover up? According to a study released by the International Rescue Committee, an estimated 5.4 million people have been killed in the the war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo since 1996. That's a death toll equivalent to the entire population of Colorado. 45,000 deaths occur every month!! And all this is taking place in an International news media blackout. In addition hundreds of thousands of women have been raped over the past decade. Who is responsible for this unspeakable horror? Could it be (pause – point at camera)... you? The protracted wars in the Congo have led to massively wide and diverse violence against civilians by an variety of armed groups. Sexual violence has become a tool of war and control on an immense scale for all the armed groups in the Congo. Both sides. But wait how can you be to blame for this, you are asking? I'll tell you why. Do you own a mobile phone, a laptop computer? A Nintendo or PlayStation? Perhaps you should ask, “How many people died today in order to manufacture my cell phone?” Our cell phones and almost all other electronic equipment contain an essential element called tantalum. Tantalum is comprised of two minerals: columbite and tantalite. The combination of these two elements is known as coltan. And 80 percent of the world’s coltan is mined in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Extraction and mining of this element has fueled vicious civil wars in the Congo since 1996. Everyone involved in the mining and sale of coltan are part of this civil war. Any household electronic, phone, remote, or a laptop can contain minerals mined in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Armed rebel groups connected with crimes of rape and murder profit from trade of these minerals. Sale of tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold mined in the eastern part of the DRC finance the militia groups that contribute to the ongoing violence in the country. These armed groups that reap enormous profits from the mineral trade in eastern Congo regularly commit shocking atrocities as they fight to control the region's most valuable mines. As well as the transportation routes and opportunities to impose taxes on everyone involved in this trade. The world's news media totally ignores this conflict. Could it have anything do do with... well draw your own conclusions why the lives of these victims are so devalued and ignored. The armed groups perpetuating the violence generate an estimated $144 million each year by trading in four main minerals, gold, tantalum, tungsten, and tin. All of of these are required to make our consumer electronics products function properly. The global demand for coltan increased when cell-phone and other electronic manufacturers discovered that this element could be used to make the products more compact. Tantalum capacitors are essential to the miniaturization of our cell phones and other gadgets. Cobalt is an important component of rechargeable batteries in mobile phones, laptops and digital cameras. Since the beginning of 2009 there has been an alarming increase in reports of sexual violence which has coincided with the renewed offensive by the Congolese armed forces against the FDLR, a Rwandan Hutu militia whose leadership was responsible for the Rwandan genocide. Many of these incidents have occurred in and around mineral rich areas of the eastern Congo. Coltan is mined by hand in the Congo by groups of men digging basins in streams and then scraping off the surface mud. A team can mine one kilo of coltan per day. Children work in mines under horrible conditions. Women are violently raped by rebels and soldiers alike and abandoned by their communities. The entire process of putting that cell phone in your pocket results in indescribable horror at every step of the way. Because war costs money weapons, ammunition and equipment have to be purchased, troops must be paid and fed. The armed thugs either occupy the mines and force civilians to work there, or they block the roads and airports on which the minerals are transported so they can illegally tax the drivers, pilots and traders. The Democratic Republic of the Congo is as large as Texas, California, Montana, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada and Colorado combined. Within this huge area there are only 300 miles of paved roads. Every day, porters carry 50 kilogram backpacks of this valuable rock across a 40-mile footpath to reach one of the many mines. Only to be met at the end of the trail at gunpoint by government soldiers who refuse reimbursement for their deadly trip.make up to five dollars a day for this work. http://www.facebook.com/conspiracyfiles http://www.youtube.com/conspiracyfiles
Views: 3723 Conspiracy Files
The Mineral Which Powers Your Mobile Phone Also Fuels Endless Violence in the Congo (2009)
 
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Congo Connection (2009): The mineral Coltan has fuelled a technological revolution in the West, but in the DRC it has become a talisman of brutal violence. For similar stories, see: Rage Of War In Congo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhHFHSNvTjo Thousands Displaced In The Congo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nk9ZG20ymeE The Future of Virunga's Mountain Gorillas Is In Jeopardy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYTht_-lOuw Subscribe to journeyman for daily uploads: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures For downloads and more information visit: http://www.journeyman.tv/film/4553 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journeymanpictures Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JourneymanVOD https://twitter.com/JourneymanNews Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/journeymanpictures Modern technology relies upon a mineral found in the Congo. Is our appetite for the latest gadgets fuelling rebel fighting in the Congo - threatening the survival of central Africa’s great gorillas? On the inside of many devices like mobile phones and laptops is the mineral ‘Coltan’, which has made our gadgets smaller and more complex. In the mineral-rich Congo, armed militia watch over the children digging this mineral from the ground. “"The government only pretends to help us"” says one miner, who pays a government official just to work. “"The Congo is a shifting sands of various militia, the largest of which is the Congolese state itself”," explains an expert on blood minerals. Yet the miners depend on the little they get from mining to survive. Electronic giants like Apple now claim they will no longer use Coltan from this area but experts are convinced the militias will “smuggle it onto the market” regardless. For local miners, the move away from African minerals is “just another way of penalising Africans”. Coltan fuels a conflict, which has seen national parks become war zones, gorillas killed for meat and hundreds of houses set on fire in turf wars over mineral territory. Yet it also feeds 400,000 petty traders. Why did it take a mobile phone to make us appreciate the injustice in the Congo? ABC Australia – Ref. 4553 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.
Views: 3356 Journeyman Pictures
alluvial coltan ore mining plant in Uganda
 
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alluvial coltan ore mining plant in Uganda, provide complete set machines, draw process flowchart and layout pictures. send engineer to mine site for equipment installation and commissioning guidance. contact: Amy Iin, whatsapp:+86- 151 8024 5397, mobile: +86- 157 7079 9318 email: [email protected]
Views: 614 Amy Lin
DRC african miners
 
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Just a shitty video on shit.
Views: 7 TOTAL FREEDOM
DR Congo mining code regulations signed into law: aides
 
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*Regulations to implement Congo’s new mining code have been signed into law with no changes, advisers to the prime minister told Reuters on Saturday, despite objections from mining firms that have been threatening legal action.* Prime Minister Bruno Tshibala signed the regulations into law overnight, his adviser Patrick Mutombo Buzangu told Reuters by telephone, but gave no further details. Changes demanded by mining industry rejected The prime minister’s legal counsel Anita Lwambwa later c… READ MORE : http://www.africanews.com/2018/06/10/dr-congo-mining-code-regulations-signed-into-law-aides Africanews on YouTube brings you a daily dose of news, produced and realised in Africa, by and for Africans. Africanews is the first pan-African multilingual media outlet, unique in its concept and vision. Subscribe on our Youtube channel https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews and receive all the latest news from the continent. Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.channel/ Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews
Views: 213 africanews
Le coltan, minerais de conflit au Congo
 
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Fungamwaka – une mine à l’est du Congo. Ces hommes travaillent pour que nous puissions téléphoner. Ils extraient du coltan – indispensable à la production de téléphones mobiles. La république démocratique du Congo est le deuxième fournisseur mondial de cette matière première rare. Fungamwaka est une mine modèle. Elle n’emploie pas d’enfant, l’État contrôle l’extraction et prélève des impôts. Les responsables de la mine travaillent de manière légale. Surtout, aucun groupe armé n’intervient ici qui finance son combat avec le trafic de matières premières. Car la longue guerre civile financée par la richesse du sol est le plus gros problème du Congo de l’Est. 90% des mines sont exploitées par des mineurs artisanaux dans des terrains frontaliers à peine accessibles – un paradis pour les groupes de rebelles qui exigent du travail forcé des travailleurs et vendent les trésors du sol sur le marché mondial en passant par les pays voisins comme le Ruanda. Les minerais sont lavés du sable à la pelle, comme aux anciens temps des chercheurs d’or. Dans la capitale de province, l’étain ne rapporte guère plus que 5 euros par kilo, le coltan quand-même 20 euros. C’est pourquoi Misereor et d’autres organisations européennes de développement demandent une intervention de l’Union Européenne. Ils souhaitent une législation ambitieuse qui coupera les liens entre les ressources naturelles et le conflit. Des entreprises agissant sur le marché européen et vendant des produits contenant des minéraux à conflit devraient être tenues responsables de leur chaîne d’approvisionnement. Elles devraient s’assurer que les droits de l’homme sont respectés tout au long de la chaîne – des matériaux bruts aux produits finis. Et elles devraient en couvrir les coûts. À Fungamwaka, les mineurs paient seuls les contrôles – ils gagnent moins. www.misereor.org/fr twitter: http://www.twitter.com/misereor
Views: 25703 Misereor
Boy describes struggle of mining cobalt in Democratic Republic of Congo
 
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A CBS News investigation found that child labor is being used in the mining of cobalt in Africa. Many top electronic and electric vehicle companies need cobalt to help power their products. Debora Patta follows one young boy home from a mine to understand the challenges he faces as his family's main provider. Subscribe to the "CBS This Morning" Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q0v2hE Watch "CBS This Morning" HERE: http://bit.ly/1T88yAR Watch the latest installment of "Note to Self," only on "CBS This Morning," HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Sh8XlB Follow "CBS This Morning" on Instagram HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q7NGnY Like "CBS This Morning" on Facebook HERE: http://on.fb.me/1LhtdvI Follow "CBS This Morning" on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Xj5W3p Follow "CBS This Morning" on Google+ HERE: http://bit.ly/1SIM4I8 Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B Delivered by Norah O’Donnell and Gayle King, "CBS This Morning" offers a thoughtful, substantive and insightful source of news and information to a daily audience of 3 million viewers. The Emmy Award-winning broadcast presents a mix of daily news, coverage of developing stories of national and global significance, and interviews with leading figures in politics, business and entertainment. Check local listings for "CBS This Morning" broadcast times.
Views: 2143 CBS This Morning
Cobalt to be declared a ''strategic'' mineral in D.R Congo
 
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An advisor to Congolese Prime Minister Jean Nkunza on Wednesday said the Democratic Republic of Congo will declare cobalt and coltan, as “strategic” minerals which will earn the country higher royalties. The natural mineral resources are used in the production of electric vehicle and renewable energy technology. A new mining code was signed into law on Friday by President Joseph Kabila despite opposition by global mining companies with operations in the DRC such as Glencore, Randgold and … READ MORE : http://www.africanews.com/2018/03/15/cobalt-to-be-declared-a-strategic-mineral-in-the-dr-congo Africanews on YouTube brings you a daily dose of news, produced and realised in Africa, by and for Africans. Africanews is the first pan-African multilingual media outlet, unique in its concept and vision. Subscribe on our Youtube channel https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews and receive all the latest news from the continent. Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.channel/ Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews
Views: 573 africanews
Coltan and Cassiterite -- Timeblind (2010)
 
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in HIFI: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7aWN6NYbOzg?fmt=22 your cel phone and portable electronics probably have minerals mined in the Congo and illegally trafficked. watch the other related videos if you are unaware of this. please support legislation to keep mining transparent and stop thugs in the congo from profiting from the misery of their fellow countrymen. DRC should be known for its amazing musicians, not for more misery like this. http://boomkat.com/downloads/261753-dj-rupture-matt-shadetek-solar-life-raft-ingredients-unmixed-singles-version http://www.amazon.com/Coltan-and-Cassiterite/dp/B0032EAJJS
Views: 1513 Timeblind
Secret Mining in the Congo
 
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UK urged: 'keep your aid but stop the raid' Professor Willy Vangu, International Spokesperson for the UDPS - DRC Opposition Party It is absurd that a country with more forests than Brazil, more minerals than Australia, more oil than Norway and more hydro-power potential than Finland can be home to over 52 million people (70 per cent of the population) who live on less than 80 pence a day. The Democratic Republic of Congo is a country with vast natural wealth and it suffers this paradox. Secretive mining deals left unchecked by the international community are a major factor in the Congolese people's enduring misery. Why does this happen? Who is behind it? Why does it matter to the UK and what can we do to stop it? Using evidence gathered from the Congo, and from off shore tax havens, Professor Willy Vangu, will explain to the world over the next few weeks the detailed workings behind BVI shell companies. Failure of the UK and the IMF to enforce existing transparency obligations on the DRC Government is wasting taxpayers' money and political capital. As a result, the opposition party of the DRC is calling on aid and loans direct to the DRC Government to be cancelled in return for renewed focus on tackling secretive mining deals, which keep the Congolese people poor and make a few within the DRC very wealthy. The background: In December 2011 a UK Member of Parliament released details of 59 shell companies, mostly registered in the British Virgin Islands and overseen by a Gibraltar trust, that have been involved in purchasing DRC mineral and oil assets. Backed by Global Witness, the MP's analysis of just four of these transactions -- all occurring in the last two years - showed a loss to the Congolese people of over $5.5 billion. This was supposed to change as part of a 2009 loan from the International Monetary Fund. This $551 million loan was conditional upon the DRC government implementing broad transparency and governance reforms in the mining sector: mining contracts were to be published, along with the details of those individuals who are behind companies that own mineral assets and state assets would be put up for public tender. None of this has happened, and the IMF has turned a blind eye. All four of the transactions resulting in the $5.5 billion loss -- 10 times the amount of the IMF loan - occurred after the IMF loan was made. That is, at the time when the IMF was supposed to be closely monitoring the DRC government's promised reforms. Cancellation of aid and loans to the DRC Government: Professor Vangu said recently, "UK Ministers should work to suspend all direct aid and loans to the Congolese government through the IMF and World Bank until it has fully complied with its obligations to the IMF. We are calling on all governments to suspend direct support of the DRC Government, including through futile transparency programmes like PROmines. UK Ministers should also seek guarantees from the DRC that secret sales of state assets to offshore 'shell' companies will be properly investigated." Furthermore, summon the will to clamp down on matters connected to your jurisdiction. This will be cheaper for the British taxpayer and more beneficial to the Congolese people than continuing to pour aid into an unaccountable government. In short, keep your aid but help end the raid. The significant impact it will make to improve the lives of the Congolese is not to be underestimated." Conservative MP and member of the International Development Select Committee, Pauline Latham has called for the suspension of direct loans to the DRC government through the IMF. She has said, "Until the IMF start enforcing the transparency caveats attached to their massive loan to the DRC Government, British taxpayers should stop their support of this regime."
Views: 1899 Willy Vangu
MINERAL CONFLICT IN CONGO © W I R MEDIA 2010
 
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As the war rages on in Congo, killing more people than the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan combined, the war in Congo continues to spiral out of control as a result of mineral conflict and international intervention. As the bodies are cleared away the major mining companies of the world move in to exploit the land and the local population to keep the international markets regulated. Congo holds 85% of the worlds reserves in almost all the minerals that contribute to the international markets consumption. Here we look at the effects it has on the populations surrounding precious mineral reserves, such as gold.
Views: 388 WIRmedia
Congo, My Precious The Curse of the coltan mines in Congo (Trailer) Premiere 5/7
 
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More films about Congo: https://rtd.rt.com/tags/congo/ “Geological scandal” is a phrase often used to describe The Democratic Republic of Congo. It is one of the world’s most resource-rich countries with extensive deposits of gold, diamonds, tungsten and uranium amongst many others. The abundance of internationally valued minerals has however failed to bring any kind of prosperity. It began with colonial exploitation of the land and its people and continued in bloody civil war, the Congolese have harvested nothing from their country’s natural riches but misery and poverty. SUBSCRIBE TO RTD Channel to get documentaries firsthand! http://bit.ly/1MgFbVy FOLLOW US RTD WEBSITE: https://RTD.rt.com/ RTD ON TWITTER: http://twitter.com/RT_DOC RTD ON FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/RTDocumentary RTD ON DAILYMOTION http://www.dailymotion.com/rt_doc RTD ON INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/rtd_documentary_channel/ RTD LIVE https://rtd.rt.com/on-air/
Views: 11789 RT Documentary
Conflict Minerals 101
 
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Congo's conflict minerals leave a trail of destruction as they make their way from the mines in eastern Congo to the mobile phone in your pocket. How does the process work? What is the human cost? What can consumers do to help end the violence being fueled by Congo's illicit mineral trade? Enough's John Prendergast breaks it all down. Visit www.raisehopeforcongo.org to find out how you can help end the world's deadliest war in the Congo. Video directed and produced by Robert Padavick. Editing and animation by Jeff Trussell. Copyright 2009 Center for American Progress.
Views: 245775 Enough Project
Conflict Minerals Legislation - View from Eastern Congo
 
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For more information visit www.RaiseHopeForCongo.org
Views: 2355 Enough Project
Capturing conflict mineral trade in DRC: Marcus Bleasdale at TEDxCourtauldInstitute
 
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The price of modern technology: capturing conflict mineral trade in Democratic Republic of Congo - Marcus Bleasdale Marcus Bleasdale is a documentary photographer who uses his work to influence policy makers around the world. His work appears in National Geographic, The New Yorker, The New York Times, TIME and his work on human rights and conflict has been shown at the US Senate, The US House of Representatives, The United Nations and the Houses of Parliament in the UK. In this eye-opening talk, Marcus' photographs bear witness to the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo that is fuelled by conflict minerals to be used in everyday electronic devices. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 8448 TEDx Talks
5 Things You Didn't Know About Conflict Minerals
 
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You may have heard of the Leonardo di Caprio film called Blood Diamond, which was about the illegal and unfair exploitation of African workers for the sake of highly sought after diamonds in the West and the perpetuation of local conflict, well Conflict Minerals are similar but in a league of their own, which in concrete terms means that conflict minerals quite literally make the world go round. These are 5 things you didn’t know about conflict minerals SUBSCRIBE to Top Lists: https://goo.gl/PHKgma 10 Rarest Foods In The World - https://goo.gl/cNdulB 10 Weirdest Sex Laws In The World - https://goo.gl/5fnu9A 5 Countries With NO Political Parties - https://goo.gl/SGKI9c ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Like us on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1KFduoO Follow Top Lists on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1OzsRG5 5 Things You Didn't Know About Conflict Minerals
Views: 17310 Top Lists
DR Congo miners upset at US 'conflict mineral' rules
 
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In the lush hills of eastern DR Congo, where the trade in rare minerals has long fed unrest, miners complain that recent US rules against "conflict minerals" have bitten into their meagre income.
Views: 141 AFP news agency
Grueling work for a tiny share in DR Congo's mineral wealth
 
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Keep up-to-date with the latest news, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/AFP-subscribe Over a hundred thousand clandestine miners in the Democratic Republic of Congo are working for a tiny share in the country's mineral wealth. Follow AFP English on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AFPnewsenglish Latest news on AFP English Twitter: https://twitter.com/AFP Share your top stories on Google+ http://bit.ly/AFP-Gplus
Views: 322 AFP news agency
DR Congo: Violence in Kasai could amount to crimes under international law
 
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Violence in the Kasai provinces of the Democratic Republic of Congo is of grave concern. The UN Human Rights Office in a report warns that the atrocities, which have seen more than 251 people killed in one territory - the Kamonia territory in Kasai - in a period of four months, could amount to crimes under international law.
Views: 1930 UN Human Rights
DRC authorities move to enhance effectiveness in the mining sector
 
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Authorities in the Democratic Republic of Congo have announced changes in the mining industry aimed at improving conditions for the final users of the country's minerals. One of them is about the establishment of economic zones around the country. The announcement was made at a mining conference in the DRC's Southwestern province of Lua-laba. It comes on the heels of a new mining code that raised taxes for mining firms. CGTN's Chris Ocam-ringa has that report. Subscribe to us on YouTube: http://ow.ly/Zvqj30aIsgY Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cgtnafrica/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/cgtnafrica
Views: 211 CGTN Africa
Cobalt Mining in the Congo
 
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Views: 57 Nate
Children still mining cobalt for gadget batteries in Congo
 
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A CBS News investigation finds we could still be carrying electronics that contain the product of child labor. A report by Amnesty International two years ago first uncovered that children were mining the mineral cobalt in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It ended up in products of dozens of companies including Apple, Microsoft, Tesla and Samsung. Debora Patta reports. Subscribe to the "CBS This Morning" Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q0v2hE Watch "CBS This Morning" HERE: http://bit.ly/1T88yAR Watch the latest installment of "Note to Self," only on "CBS This Morning," HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Sh8XlB Follow "CBS This Morning" on Instagram HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q7NGnY Like "CBS This Morning" on Facebook HERE: http://on.fb.me/1LhtdvI Follow "CBS This Morning" on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Xj5W3p Follow "CBS This Morning" on Google+ HERE: http://bit.ly/1SIM4I8 Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B Delivered by Norah O’Donnell and Gayle King, "CBS This Morning" offers a thoughtful, substantive and insightful source of news and information to a daily audience of 3 million viewers. The Emmy Award-winning broadcast presents a mix of daily news, coverage of developing stories of national and global significance, and interviews with leading figures in politics, business and entertainment. Check local listings for "CBS This Morning" broadcast times.
Views: 6051 CBS This Morning
Impoverished workers face dangerous conditions and little pay in DRC mines
 
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(22 Aug 2012) The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is expected to vote on Wednesday on the final version of US legislation on 'conflict minerals', precious minerals used to finance local wars like the 'blood diamonds' of West Africa. The Frank-Dodds Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of July 2010 requires American companies using materials vital to modern high-tech industries to reveal their supply chains. The rules governing how companies should comply with its Clause 1502 on conflict minerals - due-diligence regulations to be set by the SEC - have still not been defined. With the high-tech industry now under pressure from consumers, many companies have just stopped buying from areas like the Eastern Congo rather than face accusations, unfounded or otherwise, of using conflict minerals. And the mining communities of Eastern Congo blame that legislation for an economic disaster. The small town of Nyabibwe lies on the shores of Lake Kivu, around 60km (37 miles) to the south west of Goma in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo. It's a mining town which once prospered thanks to the abundant minerals crucial to the world economy that were found in the nearby hills. But while local shops still offer boots and shovels, but no one has bought mining equipment for months. The nearby government tin mine tells a sad story. Only a handful of workers remain, idly crushing stones to extract cassiterite, the primary ore of tin. Like many Congolese mines, activity has come to a standstill over the past two years and the miners blame the US legislation. They keep on working but hardly make a living. Mining is not mechanised and artisanal miners carve holes in hard rocks using shovels and pickaxes. The wells and tunnels that perforate Nyabibwe's mountain are narrow and pitch black; air is scarce and there is always the threat of being buried in a landslide. The price of tin from has plunged to an amount almost not worth working for. The mine used to attract more than 1,000 miners, the backbone of the economy. Today, only a few hundred remain. Given the corrupt and freewheeling world that makes up Congo's lucrative mining sector, with many mines controlled by armed groups, from foreign rebels and local militias to the Congolese army, the immediate future looks bleak. Back-to-back civil wars killed an estimated 5 million people in Congo in the 1990s. The fighting deteriorated into a greedy scramble for Congo's massive mineral wealth that drew in the armies of eight African nations. While the conflict ended in the rest of this sprawling nation in 2002, armed groups drawing on the underground wealth have continued to operate in the mineral-rich east of the country. Miners say they are not opposed to the law, but resent the 'unforseen consequences'. In fact many appreciate the fact that fraud and militarisation are being tackled. A recent Enough Project investigation said the Dodd-Frank Act has led to a 65 percent drop in armed groups' profits from the mineral trade. Rebel groups like the FDLR, or the Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda, seen here in rare footage obtained by the Associated Press, are at the heart of the never-ending violence in eastern Congo. These rebels are led by Rwandan Hutus, the instigators of Rwanda's genocide who escaped over the border. From here they continue to terrorise the population and vie for the control of natural resources worth millions of dollars. Congo's unpoliced and porous borders allow minerals to be easily smuggled into Rwanda and injected into a supposedly "clean" supply chain there. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/31738fa4576421f0f52f631d70e2eb80 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 528 AP Archive
Jean Ziegler: Congo, Coltan and the End of Capitalism
 
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Click on CC for English subtitles (subtitle size, color and opacity are set on the user's side--go to the settings gear icon at bottom right then to subtitles/options). TRANSCRIPT: Like slavery, like colonialism, like feudalism, like discrimination against women, etc., capitalism must be eliminated, destroyed. It was in Congo. One of the most precious minerals in the world is coltan. With coltan they make your camera, and portable telephones. A lot of things are made with coltan. But coltan is found in very brittle rocks. Only children from 10 to 15 years old, boys and girls, can crawl down into the pits, and they often die because the pits collapse. And I visited many of these mines that belong to large multinational corporations like Glencore, Rio Tinto... and I saw these children working as slaves who create immense wealth for a ridiculously low salary and these international mining companies who exploit child labor in Congo have more power than, for example, than the United States. To give an example, President Obama passed a law that said from now we can no longer sell on the American market minerals that were produced in inhumane conditions. Mr. Trump came to power last year so the big mining companies went to the White House and said, "This law annoys us." So Trump said, "Because you think it's an annoying law, I'm going to revoke it." And he revoked it. Public opinion in democracies... I'm not speaking about Honduras or Beijing, but in our European democracies, notably in France. If they rose up they could break these murderous systems tomorrow morning. If financial speculation on staple food supplies were forbidden in all the industrial countries, in a few months, millions and millions of human beings would be saved from hunger because financial speculation always causes increases the price of rice, wheat and corn. In other words, the quintessence of my book is that capitalism must be eliminated, destroyed, like slavery, like colonialism, like feudalism, like discrimination against women, etc. Capitalism is an economic and social system that cannot be reformed, cannot be humanized. Slavery, in the past, could not be humanized, nor could colonialism. And so this capitalism which is destroying the planet, which gives enormous fortunes to some people, must be defeated, can be defeated, with the constitutional means that we have, and that will make a place for a world order based on solidarity between all peoples, on reciprocity and complementarity. I hope also, before I die, to see the end of capitalism.
Views: 82 cdgr0820
The Blood Trail of Your Phone
 
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The DR Congo has signed a new mining law despite opposition by powerful interest groups. What does it take to extract coltan, a mineral that is used in your everyday mobile devices? Follow our social media: https://twitter.com/BareTalkTV https://www.instagram.com/baretalktv/ https://www.facebook.com/BareTalkTV/ www.BareTalkTV.com For Business Inquiries: Producer's email: [email protected] https://www.baretalktv.com/contact
Views: 45 BareTalkTV
Fiston and Joseph, the miners
 
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The activists seeking to solve Congo’s problems through “ethical” electronics consumption do not intend to make miners lives harder, but at Kisengo and other mines in the region the effects of Dodd-Frank section 1502 are hard to ignore. The impacts of the conflict mineral laws on livelihoods “may have been unintended, but they were not unknown”, pointed out Ben Radley, a PhD researcher on the issue. The draft of Trump’s executive order justifies suspending 1502 on the grounds of the “loss of livelihoods” faced by artisanal miners and the “compliance costs” to companies. But in 1502’s absence, “all these people who trade conflict minerals… could come back,” said Delly Mawazosesete, a Great Lakes researcher based in the eastern city of Goma. “On an economic level, this will be good. But for human rights and prevention of armed conflicts and their consequences, this will be bad.” But Laura Seay, a US academic who has been critical of the impact of 1502, believes any suspension will be largely symbolic. The spread of conflict mineral laws regionally and internationally means little will change “for the big corporations who operate multi-nationally”, she told IRIN. Fiston has a university degree, but there are no jobs for people without the right connections. He’ll keep digging in the hope of buying a house one day. So far, he barely finds enough gold to survive day by day. The supply chain of Congo’s industrial gold is already hermetically sealed, but artisanal activity could be targeted whenever the next phase of international efforts against conflict minerals begins. A kilo of gold is more than 1,000 times more valuable than a kilo of coltan, making it lot easier to smuggle and harder to trace. Conflict-free gold would require an even more secure supply chain, tightening the noose further on traders and miners alike. What Fiston doesn’t know yet is that a company affiliated with MMR is coming to Kamoko. Like Congo’s other industrial goldmines, it will produce perfectly conflict-free gold in a tightly controlled environment, but the operation will require far fewer hands. Their operation will likely displace him and all the artisanal miners currently eking out a living here. See more here: https://www.irinnews.org/feature/2017/02/09/who-pays-hidden-price-congo%E2%80%99s-conflict-free-minerals
Views: 284 IRIN News
DR Congo's Kabila to meet companies over mining code revision
 
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*Democratic Republic of Congo President, Joseph Kabila will meet mining company representatives on Tuesday to discuss a mining code revision awaiting his signature that would raise taxes and royalties, the mines minister said.* The bill was adopted by parliament late in January but the industry has been lobbying Kabila not to sign it, saying it would discourage investment and violate existing agreements. International mining companies in Congo, Africa’s largest copper producer, include Randgol… READ MORE : http://www.africanews.com/2018/03/03/dr-congo-s-kabila-to-meet-companies-over-mining-code-revision Africanews on YouTube brings you a daily dose of news, produced and realised in Africa, by and for Africans. Africanews is the first pan-African multilingual media outlet, unique in its concept and vision. Subscribe on our Youtube channel https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews and receive all the latest news from the continent. Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.channel/ Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews
Views: 340 africanews
Golden Gamble. Gold mining in the Philippines, a dirty business
 
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More films about the Philippines: https://rtd.rt.com/tags/philippines/ - The use of child labour in the Philippine’s Paracale, or ‘Goldtown’, is widespread - Extracting gold involves diving into mud-filled shafts and using toxic mercury - Poverty and lack of alternative jobs force people into this highly dangerous work - Many die young due to work accidents or breathing problems, others develop chronic illness The Philippines’ town of Paracale was dubbed “Goldtown” for its rich deposits of the precious metal. Despite government attempts to regulate mining, illegal pits are still commonplace. They lack even the most basic health and safety and workers are exposed to toxic mercury fumes. Dirty water causes skin diseases and they live with the constant threat of being buried alive. Workers continue to take these risks day after day, because there is no other source of income. Many of the gold miners are children whose families can’t afford to send them to school. Some gold is panned on the surface, but a lot has to be extracted from underground. To do that, prospectors dive into narrow, mud-filled shafts, uses snorkelling masks and long tubes too breathe. If the mine collapses, they have no chance of escape. They have a saying here, ‘while you’re down the mine, you have one foot in the grave’. Several miners have already died that way, others from respiratory diseases caused by inhaling mercury fumes. The toxic metal is used in gold extraction with no safety precautions, so it poisons the air, the ground and the water, causing long-term harm to the whole community. Another danger to the inhabitants of Paracale comes from disused mines, abandoned and left open, waiting for unsuspecting victims to fall in. The business takes its toll on workers, their families and the community. They have been known to demonstrate, demanding safer working conditions, better pay and other job opportunities, but change is slow. Meanwhile, extreme poverty among people who produce one of the world’s most precious metals leaves them no option but to continue with this pitiless occupation. SUBSCRIBE TO RTD Channel to get documentaries firsthand! http://bit.ly/1MgFbVy FOLLOW US RTD WEBSITE: https://RTD.rt.com/ RTD ON TWITTER: http://twitter.com/RT_DOC RTD ON FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/RTDocumentary RTD ON DAILYMOTION http://www.dailymotion.com/rt_doc RTD ON INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/rtd_documentary_channel/ RTD LIVE https://rtd.rt.com/on-air/
Views: 384099 RT Documentary
REON - COLTAN - (PROD SAUZE FZ) ONE SHOT #coltan #congo #africahiphop
 
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Lyrics: Congo, long road to go mine Slow growth all along this time Chocked, surrounded by crime Criminals beat the police, if there´s a difference between them I got a dream, ¿will I accomplish it? Well not many did, many found defeat Coltan for the chinese, death for our kids Coltan for the europeans, americans, so my enslaver can get paid, unfair trade, like it has been for decades, fill his gun and keep this war None, changes done, cause we ignore So much that they want us to forget Lets get out of this net Can´t be the pets of a rotten system Companies competition, not enough resistance Pathetic, no ethic, they know the victims But they wanna know the money, no matter if it goes bloody Cheap workforce Tis situation could be the worse of the world Cause this motherfuckers help keeping it cold First step, then we buy their phones We all know their names and we can stop their game Is us because the media shuts the fuck up Like they got amnesia Like coltan jumps out of ¨alquimia" We gotta be conscious, take actions, contractions of that market Create products to target I ain´t a preacher Not your teacher But we are cut of that right education Is the UN gonna make a conversion? "You´ll bend to this industry", that´s the message Would we be monsters if we saw their faces Far away, easy to hide the traces, as chaos embraces panic We don´t restrict, like violence addicts we finnance the conflict So hear the music How many times will you reproduce it? While you forget your lifestyle is abusive Your silence a threat You gotta stop Buying can be lethal Destroying their lifes from the top Inocent people So countries don´t act like you are away when you see those women raped, those kids trained so their right thinking does not awake It would stay go on if we werent here But there would be less money, less fear And we would surely calm down the tears A lot look from our tower, not conscious about what happens, not knowing how big is our power --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Producido por Sauze Fz Canal: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9ASNJPcIihIOJ0lMw5RUGA Grabación, Mezcla y Masterización por Sacker Canal: https://www.youtube.com/user/S18bs
Views: 302 Reon's Resolution
Mining millions from emptying latrines
 
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His girlfriend and family abandoned me because I empty latrines New Vision TV offers analyzed news content on trending stories in Uganda, be it politics, business, and the day today life This is broadcast in various shows such as The daily News bulletin, the hourly news updates, the business show called The Handshake and Music News show. Since Uganda is known as the Pearl of Africa, New Vision TV has a show that broadcasts Uganda’s beauty called the Pearl of Africa. https://www.facebook.com/thenewvision/ http://www.newvision.co.ug/ https://twitter.com/newvisionwire
Views: 1197 New Vision TV
Conflict Minerals 101: 2018 Update | Enough Project
 
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Until recent years, the conflict minerals supply chain was a very lucrative scheme for Congo’s armed groups and even parts of the Congolese army. But now that’s all changing. Check out Enough’s updated conflict minerals 101 video and learn about what you can do to continue to hold companies accountable. Animation produced by Revolution Messaging; Animator: Adili Ailixier, Director: Eric Elofson, Voiceover: Morgan Hill.
Views: 4250 Enough Project
Afghanistan's Secret Billion Dollar Emerald Mines
 
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Hidden Gems: After suffering the Soviets, the Taliban, and the War on Terror, Afghanistan has had its share of turmoil; but can 1,000 billion dollars worth of emeralds lift Afghanistan out of poverty? Subscribe to Journeyman for daily uploads: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures For similar stories see: Exposing The Inhumane Conditions Of Burkina Faso's Gold Mines https://youtu.be/c7iv1fef6qo Zimbabwe's Blood Diamond Killing Fields https://youtu.be/k9Bk5VIhjiY The Children Risking Their Lives In Underwater Gold Mines https://youtu.be/P1L_pxYZVwE "We have a lot of requests from Europe because the Emeralds from Afghanistan are the best in the world", Raphael says. He's a Frenchman who first came to Afghanistan to train Afghan security services before venturing into the emerald trade. He sees a huge chance here to exploit a market that could easily increase in value twenty or thirty-fold, but the obstacles are not inconsiderable. Just to get to the mines Raphael has to travel the 150 Kilometres from Kabul to Panjshir, right through Taliban kidnap country. When he gets there he finds an industry in the dark ages, where homemade pyrotechnics are exploded in poorly dug mineshafts, killing many miners and ruining the quality of up to 75% of the stones they dig. "If you see the damage being done to these stones... so much is lost", Yama Torabi from Integrity Watch Afghanistan tells us. The government here remains hopelessly out of touch with the industry that "still (uses) a mining law adopted 100 years ago". But as the country prepares for elections and Europeans like Raphael open up the gem trade here, could this be a beacon of hope for the future? For downloads and more information visit: http://www.journeyman.tv/?lid=67019 Wild Angle Productions - Ref. 6082 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.
Views: 2030780 Journeyman Pictures
DRC Facing Major Mining Challenges
 
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As much as two thirds of the world's known minerals can be found in the Democratic Republic of Congo. But majority of the mineral exports are beyond state control. The DRC government is now putting measures in place to regulate mining activities in the country. CCTV's Trevor Ombija with more
Views: 115 CGTN Africa
Children ditch school for mining in DRC
 
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NGOs are calling for action as children in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo turn their backs on school to work in the region's mines, rich in coltan, copper, cobalt, gold and diamonds. Duration: 02:18
Views: 3551 AFP news agency
Mining and economic development in DRC
 
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Archie Stay Research question: How has mining in the Democratic Republic of Congo been beneficial to sustainable economic development? *This remains the intellectual property of Archie Stay
Views: 98 SPIRE Keele
Afrika, You Have No Friends: UN Peacekeeper Truck Found with Stollen Minerals in DRC & US Build Act
 
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BlackJunction.tv: https://blackjunction.tv/@AfrikanEsq Afrikan Esq Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Afrikan-Esq-207249553218920/?modal=admin_todo_tour FAL Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/FederationofAfrikanLiberation/ FAL Supporters Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1799714806734414/ Pan African News Press Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/311229322721714/ Instagram: afrikan_esq Twitter: https://twitter.com/BeautBlackMind Email: [email protected]
Views: 13274 Afrikan Esq
UN Peacekeeper Truck Found with Stollen Minerals in DRC & US Build Act
 
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RHvP4Pn0knY
Views: 113 1THETUFFGUY
Human Rights Program Undergraduate Event: "Conflict Minerals and Human Rights in the DRC"
 
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Human Rights Program Undergraduate Event: "Conflict Minerals and Human Rights in the DRC" Dr. Denis Mukwege, renowned human rights advocate for women of the Democratic Republic of Congo Michael Ramsdell, director of the film“When Elephants Fight.” The Human Rights Program invited undergraduate students to join in conversation on ""Conflict Minerals and Human Rights in the Democratic Republic of Congo"" with Dr. Denis Mukwege, renowned human rights advocate for women of the Democratic Republic of Congo and Michael Ramsdell, director of the film "When Elephants Fight."
Byamungu, the radio announcer
 
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Faced with the low coltan prices in Kisengo, Congo, many miners and traders have taken the sandy road leading northward. Gold has attracted miners to Kamoko Quarry since the 1990s. Like Kisengo, it used to be a tiny village, but today it’s a town, with bars, restaurants, a radio station, hotels, and tick-infested brothels. The military, the police, and a flood of government agencies have set up shop in Kamoko, each with their own rules and taxes. See more here: https://www.irinnews.org/feature/2017/02/09/who-pays-hidden-price-congo%E2%80%99s-conflict-free-minerals
Views: 267 IRIN News
🇨🇩 Congo and the General | People & Power
 
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The Democratic Republic of Congo has been engulfed in conflict of one sort or another since 1996. The fighting, between the government and a complex, ever-shifting array of rebel militias, has resulted in the deaths of an estimated six million people and the injury, rape and forced displacement of a great many more. The international community has tried many times to help the country resolve some of these problems - or at least to mitigate their consequences - with the United Nations maintaining a peacekeeping presence since 1999. Known as MONUSCO (United Nations Organisation Stabilisation Mission in the DR Congo), it is currently the largest and most expensive such mission in the world, comprising 21,000 uniformed personnel from 50 different nations with a budget of just under $1.5bn. But for all its size and resources, the force has frequently been criticised in the past for being ineffectual, overcautious and for failing to meet its responsibility to protect the country's vulnerable citizens from harm. In practice this has meant that while civilians have frequently sought and found sanctuary at UN bases, its troops have rarely been allowed to venture out of those compounds to engage with the armed groups and militias. Indeed, on more than one occasion, the most brutal acts have been carried out even as the peacekeepers looked on. For example, as recently as last July, a militia known as Mai Mai Cheka took over a town called Pinga, decapitated civilians and threw the severed heads at the local UN base, shouting: "Take these, you’re the ones who like meat." But at long last things are changing. The UN force now has sharper teeth and new rules of engagement. In March last year, the UN Security Council sanctioned the creation of a new Force Intervention Brigade (FIB), made up of 3,000 well-equipped combat troops from South Africa, Tanzania and Malawi and gave it a mandate to "neutralise and disarm" the various armed groups. It was a crucial decision because it meant that for the first time in the organisation's history, soldiers wearing the UN blue helmet were being allowed to go on the offensive, rather than having to sit helplessly by as atrocities took place. In other words, the peacekeepers could become peacemakers. As it took shape last summer, this beefed-up force was placed under a new commander, Lieutenant-General Carlos Santos Cruz, an energetic 62-year-old Brazilian. He was tasked with cutting through the inertia that has brought the UN so much criticism in the past. Half-way through his one year appointment it is already clear the general has wrought some dramatic changes. The first tangible signs of the new approach came towards the end of last year when the Congolese Army, the FARDC, closely supported by the new UN force, successfully defeated the rebel M23 group, which had humiliated the FARDC a year earlier when they marched largely unopposed into Goma, the regional capital of North Kivu province. On that occasion the UN did not intervene, even when troops from both sides went on a rampage of looting and raping women and children in the area. But in October and November 2013, under General Santos Cruz's watchful eye and provided with better training, intelligence, back-up and logistics support, the FARDC was both more effective and (for that moment at least) more disciplined. Crucially, the fact that they were also fighting alongside a potent UN force that was prepared to go on the offensive made a significant difference. As the general explained later, this new proactive stance is now the UN's guiding principle in the DR Congo. "We are going to protect the civilians, eliminate and neutralise the threats," he said. "We are not going to wait for the threat to come here against the civilians." To find out what this means in practice, People & Power went behind the scenes with the general and his FIB force as they consolidated their gains, gathered intelligence on rebel activity, and prepared to launch a new joint UN/FARDC offensive. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 894550 Al Jazeera English

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