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Symmetric Key and Public Key Encryption
 
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Modern day encryption is performed in two different ways. Check out http://YouTube.com/ITFreeTraining or http://itfreetraining.com for more of our always free training videos. Using the same key or using a pair of keys called the public and private keys. This video looks at how these systems work and how they can be used together to perform encryption. Download the PDF handout http://itfreetraining.com/Handouts/Ce... Encryption Types Encryption is the process of scrambling data so it cannot be read without a decryption key. Encryption prevents data being read by a 3rd party if it is intercepted by a 3rd party. The two encryption methods that are used today are symmetric and public key encryption. Symmetric Key Symmetric key encryption uses the same key to encrypt data as decrypt data. This is generally quite fast when compared with public key encryption. In order to protect the data, the key needs to be secured. If a 3rd party was able to gain access to the key, they could decrypt any data that was encrypt with that data. For this reason, a secure channel is required to transfer the key if you need to transfer data between two points. For example, if you encrypted data on a CD and mail it to another party, the key must also be transferred to the second party so that they can decrypt the data. This is often done using e-mail or the telephone. In a lot of cases, sending the data using one method and the key using another method is enough to protect the data as an attacker would need to get both in order to decrypt the data. Public Key Encryption This method of encryption uses two keys. One key is used to encrypt data and the other key is used to decrypt data. The advantage of this is that the public key can be downloaded by anyone. Anyone with the public key can encrypt data that can only be decrypted using a private key. This means the public key does not need to be secured. The private key does need to be keep in a safe place. The advantage of using such a system is the private key is not required by the other party to perform encryption. Since the private key does not need to be transferred to the second party there is no risk of the private key being intercepted by a 3rd party. Public Key encryption is slower when compared with symmetric key so it is not always suitable for every application. The math used is complex but to put it simply it uses the modulus or remainder operator. For example, if you wanted to solve X mod 5 = 2, the possible solutions would be 2, 7, 12 and so on. The private key provides additional information which allows the problem to be solved easily. The math is more complex and uses much larger numbers than this but basically public and private key encryption rely on the modulus operator to work. Combing The Two There are two reasons you want to combine the two. The first is that often communication will be broken into two steps. Key exchange and data exchange. For key exchange, to protect the key used in data exchange it is often encrypted using public key encryption. Although slower than symmetric key encryption, this method ensures the key cannot accessed by a 3rd party while being transferred. Since the key has been transferred using a secure channel, a symmetric key can be used for data exchange. In some cases, data exchange may be done using public key encryption. If this is the case, often the data exchange will be done using a small key size to reduce the processing time. The second reason that both may be used is when a symmetric key is used and the key needs to be provided to multiple users. For example, if you are using encryption file system (EFS) this allows multiple users to access the same file, which includes recovery users. In order to make this possible, multiple copies of the same key are stored in the file and protected from being read by encrypting it with the public key of each user that requires access. References "Public-key cryptography" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public-k... "Encryption" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encryption
Views: 417501 itfreetraining
RSA Public Key Cryptography
 
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CS1231 Group 20 To view the presentation only, visit http://youtu.be/Yf3k1c1YEuA?hd=1 Copyright, NUS, 2011 Some people asked about the source code for the C program we used, you can find the original version (not coded by us) here: http://cppgm.blogspot.com/2008/01/rsa-algorithm.html
Views: 27168 xkiller213
Public key cryptography - Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange (full version)
 
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The history behind public key cryptography & the Diffie-Hellman key exchange algorithm. We also have a video on RSA here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXB-V_Keiu8
Views: 586322 Art of the Problem
RSA: Key Generation / Encryption / Decryption - شرح بالعربي
 
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شرح كامل للتشفير و فك التشفير وعمل المفتاح عن طريق شيفرة RSA بطريقة مبسطة مع حل مثال. - سيف بدران Information Security and Privacy - RSA Cipher Key Creation + Encyption + Decryption Fully Explained with Example. Done By: Saif Badran http://www.facebook.com/saif.badran iTeam Academic Group - JU
Views: 48371 iAcademy
RSA Algorithm with solved example using extended euclidean algorithm | CSS series #7
 
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Take the Full Course of Cryptography and Network Security What we Provide 1) 20 Videos (Index is given down) + More Update will be Coming Before final exams 2)Hand made Notes with problems for your to practice 3)Strategy to Score Good Marks in Cryptography and Network Scurity To buy the course click https://goo.gl/mpbaK3 if you have any query email us at [email protected] Sample Notes : https://goo.gl/Ze1FpX or Fill the form we will contact you https://goo.gl/forms/2SO5NAhqFnjOiWvi2 Cryptography and System Security Index Lecture 1 Introduction to Cryptography and Security System Lecture 2 Security Goals and Mechanism Lecture 3 Symmetric Cipher Lecture 4 Substitution Cipher Lecture 5 Transposition Cipher Lecture 6 Stream and Block Cipher Lecture 7 Mono Alphabetic Cipher Lecture 8 Poly Alphabetic Cipher Lecture 9 Diffie Hellman Lecture 10 RSA Algorithm with Solved Example Lecture 11 IDEA Algorithm Full Working Lecture 12 SHA-1 Algorithm Full Working Lecture 13 Blowfish Algorithm Full working Lecture 14 DES Algorithm Full Working Lecture 15 Confusion and Diffusion Lecture 16 AES Algorithm Full working Lecture 17 Kerberos Lecture 18 Malicious Software ( Virus and worms ) Lecture 19 DOS and DDOS Attack Lecture 20 Digital Signature Full working Explained More videos Coming Soon.
Views: 184851 Last moment tuitions
Elliptic Curve Cryptography Overview
 
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John Wagnon discusses the basics and benefits of Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) in this episode of Lightboard Lessons. Check out this article on DevCentral that explains ECC encryption in more detail: https://devcentral.f5.com/articles/real-cryptography-has-curves-making-the-case-for-ecc-20832
Views: 133123 F5 DevCentral
How secure is 256 bit security?
 
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Supplement to the cryptocurrency video: How hard is it to find a 256-bit hash just by guessing and checking? What kind of computer would that take? Cryptocurrency video: https://youtu.be/bBC-nXj3Ng4 Thread for Q&A questions: http://3b1b.co/questions Several people have commented about how 2^256 would be the maximum number of attempts, not the average. This depends on the thing being attempted. If it's guessing a private key, you are correct, but for something like guessing which input to a hash function gives a desired output (as in bitcoin mining, for example), which is the kind of thing I had in mind here, 2^256 would indeed be the average number of attempts needed, at least for a true cryptographic hash function. Think of rolling a die until you get a 6, how many rolls do you need to make, on average? Music by Vince Rubinetti: https://vincerubinetti.bandcamp.com/album/the-music-of-3blue1brown ------------------ 3blue1brown is a channel about animating math, in all senses of the word animate. And you know the drill with YouTube, if you want to stay posted on new videos, subscribe, and click the bell to receive notifications (if you're into that). If you are new to this channel and want to see more, a good place to start is this playlist: http://3b1b.co/recommended Various social media stuffs: Website: https://www.3blue1brown.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/3Blue1Brown Patreon: https://patreon.com/3blue1brown Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/3blue1brown Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/3Blue1Brown
Views: 768573 3Blue1Brown
RSA-129 - Numberphile
 
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The large number "RSA-129" posed a challenge experts said would take 40 quadrillion years to solve - but took 17. Featuring Ron Rivest, co-inventor of RSA... More links below... Our original RSA video (how it all works): https://youtu.be/M7kEpw1tn50 More from Ron from this interview (quantum computing): https://youtu.be/tX7e7CgWrvM More Ron Rivest on Numberphile: http://bit.ly/RonRivest Ron Rivest's own website: https://people.csail.mit.edu/rivest/ Public Key Cryptography on our sister channel, Computerphile: https://youtu.be/GSIDS_lvRv4 RSA-129: 114381625757888867669235779976146612010218296721242362562561842935706935245733897830597123563958705058989075147599290026879543541 Numberphile is supported by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI): http://bit.ly/MSRINumberphile We are also supported by Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation initiative dedicated to engaging everyone with the process of science. NUMBERPHILE Website: http://www.numberphile.com/ Numberphile on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/numberphile Numberphile tweets: https://twitter.com/numberphile Subscribe: http://bit.ly/Numberphile_Sub Videos by Brady Haran Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/numberphile Brady's videos subreddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/BradyHaran/ Brady's latest videos across all channels: http://www.bradyharanblog.com/ Sign up for (occasional) emails: http://eepurl.com/YdjL9
Views: 381936 Numberphile
Truly Anonymous Credentials Using Modern Cryptography - Matthew Di Ferrante
 
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When using anonymous networks like Tor or I2P, one problem is always how to prevent spam/DoS attacks when you cannot distinguish one entity from another, and hence cannot limit them without either compromising their anonymity by requiring registration of some kind, or requiring captcha-like challenges which are time consuming to implement and usually only a temporary solution at best. Here I introduce a new kind of authentication system based on homomorphic properties of elliptic curve cryptography and zero knowledge proofs called "Linkable Ring Signatures". It allows one to add their public key to a larger group of existing public keys, called a "ring", and sign using the entire "ring" of keys + private key in such a way that no one can tell which private key has signed the message, but can mathematically verify that it was one private key corresponding to one of the public keys in the ring. On top of that, it allows a verifier that only has access to the public keys in the ring to make sure that for any one [message, ring] pair, a private key has only signed it once - duplicate signatures for the same message are detectable. This allows for limiting interactions from any party holding one of these access keys (to say, one message per minute per key), without the party losing any anonymity as their signature is indistinguishable from any other party in the ring. Furthermore, because ring signatures use a cryptographic component called "zero knowledge proofs", signing reveals zero information about the private key - hence no matter how many signatures are generated, it is impossible to use them to try to forge messages or fingerprint/bruteforce the signer key. The proof of this will be shown in the talk. In this talk I will walk through the cryptographic primitives that make this possible, and show a demo service on Tor/I2P that implements this scheme to make an anti-spam anonymous forum.
Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange
 
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This video explains why key exchange is an issue in cryptography and introduces Diffie-Hellman's solution to this problem. NB : This video was created as a part of an assignment. It is heavily influenced from another youtube video which you can find here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEBfamv-_do
Views: 42326 Bishal Sapkota
Working at RSA
 
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RSA employees from across the world share what it is like to work for the company
Views: 15471 RSA Insurance Group
Will Quantum Computers break encryption?
 
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How do you secure messages over the internet? How do quantum computers break it? How do you fix it? Why don't you watch the video to find out? Why does this description have so many questions? Why are you still reading? What is the meaning of life? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frameofessence Twitter: https://twitter.com/frameofessence YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/frameofessence CLARIFICATIONS: You don't actually need a quantum computer to do quantum-safe encryption. As briefly mentioned at 7:04 , there are encryption schemes that can be run on regular computers that can't be broken by quantum computers. CORRECTIONS: [2:18] Technically, you can use any key to encrypt or decrypt whatever you want. But there's a specific way to use them that's useful, which is what's shown in the video. [5:36] In RSA, depending on exactly what you mean by "private key", neither key is actually derivable from the other. When they are created, they are generated together from a common base (not just the public key from the private key). But typically, the file that stores the "private key" actually contains a bit more information than just the private key. For example, in PKCS #1 RSA private key format ( https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3447#appendix-A.1.2 ), the file technically contains the entire public key too. So in short, you technically can't get the public key from the private key or vice versa, but the file that contains the private key can hold more than just the private key alone, making it possible to retrieve the public key from it. Video links: Encryption and HUGE numbers - Numberphile https://youtu.be/M7kEpw1tn50 The No Cloning Theorem - minutephysics https://youtu.be/owPC60Ue0BE Quantum Entanglement & Spooky Action at a Distance - Veritasium https://youtu.be/ZuvK-od647c Sources: Quantum Computing for Computer Scientists http://books.google.ca/books/about/Quantum_Computing_for_Computer_Scientist.html?id=eTT0FsHA5DAC Random person talking about Quantum MITM attacks http://crypto.stackexchange.com/questions/2719/is-quantum-key-distribution-safe-against-mitm-attacks-too The Ekert Protocol (i.e. E91) http://www.ux1.eiu.edu/~nilic/Nina's-article.pdf Annealing vs. Universal Quantum Computers https://medium.com/quantum-bits/what-s-the-difference-between-quantum-annealing-and-universal-gate-quantum-computers-c5e5099175a1 Images, Documents, and Screenshots: Post-Quantum Cryptography initiatives http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/ST/post-quantum-crypto/cfp-announce-dec2016.html http://pqcrypto.eu.org/docs/initial-recommendations.pdf Internet map (Carna Botnet) http://census2012.sourceforge.net/ Quantum network maps https://www.slideshare.net/ADVAOpticalNetworking/how-to-quantumsecure-optical-networks http://www.secoqc.net/html/press/pressmedia.html IBM Quantum http://research.ibm.com/ibm-q/ Music: YouTube audio library: Blue Skies Incompetech: Jay Jay Pamgaea The House of Leaves Premium Beat: Cutting Edge Technology Second Time Around Swoosh 1 sound effect came from here: http://soundbible.com/682-Swoosh-1.html ...and is under this license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/sampling+/1.0/
Views: 387687 Frame of Essence
RSA vs ECC
 
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Public Cryptosystem
Views: 5782 Israel Reyes
Public Key Infrastructure Fundamentals - Bart Preneel
 
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The function of a public key infrastructure (PKI) is to ensure secure delivery and management of public keys. Alternative trust models lead to different key architectures. Public keys are published by means of digitally signed certificates. A private key may be compromised, in which case the certificate containing the corresponding public key must be revoked. Many revocation methods are in current use. Publication of Certificate Revocation Lists (CRLs) and checking with an Online Certificate Status Protocol (OCSP) responder are best established. Learning objectives + learn the components of a public key infrastructure. + understand key delivery and management mechanisms. A lecture by Bart Preneel at SecAppDev 2013 in Leuven, Belgium. Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the K.U.Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 50218 secappdev.org
Cryptography RSA algorithm (BCA, MCA) by Mrs. Rashmi Sharma
 
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It is part of lecturer provided by Mrs. Rashmi Sharma, Asst. Prof. in Biyani Group of colleges on behalf of gurukpo.This lecturer is about RSA algorithm which is more secure cryptographic algorithm. It is more secure Asymmetric key algorithm. It is 70 times more secure then Symmetric key algorithm (e.g. DES) Hope you like it for more videos and study material please visit http://www.Gurukpo.com.
Views: 21277 Guru Kpo
Cryptography and Network Security - RSA Algorithm - GATE(CSE) - Unacademy
 
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The complete YouTube playlist can be viewed here: https://goo.gl/mjyDev This lesson explains IRSA Algorithm, under the course, "Cryptography and Network Security for GATE Computer Science Engineering". The lesson explains the following subtopics: RSA Algorithm Key Generation Encryption & Decryption Some important terminology and concepts are also illustrated, for the better understanding of the subject. For the entire course: https://goo.gl/aTMBNZ For more lessons by Ansha Pk: https://goo.gl/2DX9Wn Must watch for all the GATE/ESE/PSU Exams. Download the Unacademy Learning App from the Google Play Store here:- https://goo.gl/02OhYI Download the Unacademy Educator app from the Google Play Store here: https://goo.gl/H4LGHE Do Subscribe and be a part of the community for more such lessons here: https://goo.gl/UGFo7b Visit Our Facebook Group on GATE here: https://goo.gl/cPj5sb Cryptography and Network Security - Public Key Cryptography - Unacademy GATE(CSE)
Introduction to Cryptography: Part 4 (Public Key, PKI and Identity)
 
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More details at: http://asecuritysite.com/encryption and specifically at: http://asecuritysite.com/encryption/dc
Views: 5308 Bill Buchanan OBE
Provo Linux User Group - 8/17/2015 - Aaron Toponce - "Crypto Algorithms"
 
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Aaron Toponce will talk about symmetric and asymmetric cryptography, and the current cipher algorithms covering them, such as RSA, AES, and ECC. He'll talk about how encryption and decryption work, as well as digital signatures and verification. He'll include the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, and the SSL/TLS handshake. Further, given the disaster on OpenSSL during the year of 2014, he'll talk about the major threats that compromised online security with SSL and TLS. He'll explain the differences between: * SSL 2.0* SSL 3.0* TLS 1.0* TLS 1.1* TLS 1.2* TLS 1.3 (draft status) He'll talk about the implemented ciphers and hashes, including their advantages and shortcomings. He'll discuss the attacks that took advantage of these shortcomings, such as Heartbleed and POODLE. He'll show how system administrators how to properly secure their web, mail, and other servers that require SSL/TLS. Finally, he'll discuss OpenPGP and OpenSSH concepts. By the end of this talk, the basic mysticism that is crypto should be all cleared up.
Views: 358 Utah Open Source
Linux Tutorial for Beginners - 15 - SSH Key Authentication
 
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Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/TheNewBoston-464114846956315/ GitHub - https://github.com/buckyroberts Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+BuckyRoberts LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/buckyroberts reddit - https://www.reddit.com/r/thenewboston/ Support - https://www.patreon.com/thenewboston thenewboston - https://thenewboston.com/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/bucky_roberts
Views: 128061 thenewboston
ECC vs RSA: Battle of the Crypto-Ninjas
 
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RSA is the oldest kid in the public-key cryptography playground, and its position of toughest and fastest is under sharp competition from ECC (Elliptic Curve Cryptography). We look at the mathematical difference between the two cryptosystems, showing why ECC is faster and harder than RSA, but also very energy efficient hence its unique advantage in the mobile space. We show how to use ECC in your Java and Android applications. Before finally summarising the state of the union for RSA and ECC in the light of the Snowden leaks, and the likely near-future for public-key cryptography. Author: James McGivern A mathematician turned programmer, James has been working in the software engineer for over 5 years in various industries. He revels in problems that involve data structures or algorithms. Currently working for Cisco's Cloud Web Security group building cloud-based SaaS platform providing real-time threat detection and filtering of internet traffic. James's ambitions are to become a polymath and be a space tourist
Views: 498 Parleys
PKCS
 
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In cryptography, PKCS is a group of public-key cryptography standards devised and published by RSA Security Inc, starting in the early 1990s. The company published the standards to promote the use of the cryptography techniques to which they had patents, such as the RSA algorithm, the Schnorr signature algorithm and several others. Though not industry standards (because the company retained control over them), some of the standards in recent years have begun to move into the "standards-track" processes of relevant standards organizations such as the IETF and the PKIX working-group. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1552 Audiopedia
The concept of symmetric and asymmetric cryptography
 
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In this Video, Dr. Seema Batra, Assistant professor, Biyani Groups of Colleges, Jaipur, explains about the concept of symmetric and asymmetric cryptography. http://www.gurukpo.com/ http://www.biyanicolleges.org/
Views: 11422 Guru Kpo
Blockchain tutorial 11: Elliptic Curve key pair generation
 
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This is part 11 of the Blockchain tutorial explaining how the generate a public private key using Elliptic Curve. In this video series different topics will be explained which will help you to understand blockchain. Bitcoin released as open source software in 2009 is a cryptocurrency invented by Satoshi Nakamoto (unidentified person or group of persons). After the introduction of Bitcoin many Bitcoin alternatives were created. These alternate cryptocurrencies are called Altcoins (Litecoin, Dodgecoin etc). Bitcoin's underlying technology is called Blockchain. The Blockchain is a distributed decentralized incorruptible database (ledger) that records blocks of digital information. Each block contains a timestamp and a link to a previous block. Soon people realises that there many other use cases where the Blockchain technology can be applied and not just as a cryptocurrency application. New Blockchain platforms were created based on the Blockchain technology, one of which is called Ethereum. Ethereum focuses on running programming code, called smart contracts, on any decentralized application. Using the new Blockchain platforms, Blockchain technology can be used in supply chain management, healthcare, real estate, identity management, voting, internet of things, etcetera, just to name a few. Today there is a growing interest in Blockchain not only in the financial sector but also in other sectors. Explaining how Blockchain works is not easy and for many the Blockchain technology remains an elusive concept. This video series tries to explain Blockchain to a large audience but from the bottom up. Keywords often used in Blockchain conversation will be explained. Each Blockchain video is short and to the point. It is recommended to watch each video sequentially as I may refer to certain Blockchain topics explained earlier. Check out all my other Blockchain tutorial videos https://goo.gl/aMTFHU Subscribe to my YouTube channel https://goo.gl/61NFzK The presentation used in this video tutorial can be found at: http://www.mobilefish.com/developer/blockchain/blockchain_quickguide_tutorial.html The presentation used in this video tutorial can be found at: http://www.mobilefish.com/developer/blockchain/blockchain_quickguide_tutorial.html The python script used in the video: https://www.mobilefish.com/download/cryptocurrency/bitcoin_ec_key_generation.py.txt Cryptocurrency address generator and validator: https://www.mobilefish.com/services/cryptocurrency/cryptocurrency.html Desmos graph: https://www.desmos.com/calculator/kkj2efqk5x James D'Angelo, Bitcoin 101 Elliptic Curve Cryptography Part 4: https://youtu.be/iB3HcPgm_FI #mobilefish #blockchain #bitcoin #cryptocurrency #ethereum
Views: 13902 Mobilefish.com
What Does RSA Stand For In The Encryption World?
 
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What Does RSA Stand For In The Encryption World? KNOW MORE ABOUT What Does RSA Stand For In The Encryption World? Volume 13 issue encrypt techniques like aes, des and rsa algorithms compared their performance of based on the analysis its last round for decryption does not involve “Inversemix columns&#8221the first important thing here is encoding that text. Math69, 103 109, 1996'remarks on a proposed cryptanalytic attack the mit public key cryptosystem. The acronym stands for rivest, shamir, and adelman, the inventors of technique. Rsa stands for ron rivest, adi shamir, and leonard adleman who first publicly described the algorithm in 1977, based on difficulty of factoring large integers 3 jun 2009 such a way that decryption key may not be easily deduced from public encryption keyd) publicity e does compromise secrecy d, meaning you cannot figure outin their 1978 rsa paper, authors predicted secure email world to evolve meijer, a'groups, factoring, cryptography. Let's discuss the mathematics behind public key encryption via rsa algorithm. Rsa encryption from wolfram mathworld. Have been corrected, and several of the answers updated. What is rsa encryption? Definition from techopedia. While bob's encryption exponent e can be quite small (e. It can be used to encrypt a message without the need this actually does not matter too much (providing m is always n), but some schemes require modulus of exact length. A method for obtaining digital signatures and public key cryptosystems this document is version 4. Rsa (cryptosystem) wikipedia. The encryption must be done in such a way that decryption is only possible with knowledge of secret key. Some misprints and errors in version 4. Rsa is the standard encryption method for important data, especially data that's transmitted over internet. How does rsa work? Hacker noon. Network, web & security. This would mean you'd first apply some padding to your message, e. Encryption example with rsa 23 jun 2017 is an asymmetric system, which means that a key pair will be generated (we see how soon) public and private obviously you keep rather slow so it's hardly used to encrypt data more frequently it pass around symmetric keys can actually deal real world examples. Sensitive data exchanged between a user and web site needs to be encrypted prevent it from being disclosed or modified by unauthorized parties. The decryption key the rsa cryptosystem is most widely used public cryptography algorithm in world. The mathematics of the rsa public key cryptosystemrsa encryption step 4 (video) how maths will protect us while p! np datio. In such a cryptosystem, the encryption key is public and it different from decryption which kept secret (private) rsa (cryptosystem), rivest shamir adleman cryptosystem for. And so a public key encryption technology developed by rsa data security, inc. Rsa conference, an annual cryptography convention; factoring challenge, a computational number theory challenge aimed at factorizing gi
Hackerzvoice NDH2k14 Talks : Renaud LIFCHITZ "A Common weakness in RSA Signatures"
 
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This talk will show a very common weakness in RSA signatures. We will be able to computationally extract public RSA keys from communications and embedded systems in case the public key is voluntarily not published. This weakens RSA signatures where keys of small sizes and/or quality are used and allows direct factoring attacks. 2 studies will be conducted on PGP/GPG e-mails and on the Vigik access control system which protects access to nearly 1 million buildings in France. Bio: Renaud Lifchitz is a French senior IT security consultant. He has a solid penetration testing, training and research background. His main interests are protocol security (authentication, cryptography, protocol security, information leakage, zero-knowledge proof, RFID security) and number theory. He currently mostly works on wireless protocols and was speaker for the following international conferences: CCC 2010 (Germany), Hackito Ergo Sum 2010 & 2012 (France), DeepSec 2012 (Austria), Shakacon 2012 (USA), 8dot8 2013 (Chile)
Views: 1305 communication HZV
What are certificates?
 
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Certificates are used to prove identity and used for creating secure communication. Check out http://itfreetraining.com for more of our always free training videos. This video looks at how a certificate works, what is a certificate and how they are used for identification and secure communication. Download the PDF handout http://itfreetraining.com/Handouts/Certificates/WhatAreCertificates.pdf What is a certificate? A certificate is an electronic document that contains data fields. When compared to a traditional paper certificate there are some similarities between an electronic certificate and a physical certificate. Digital certificates like a physical certificate are issued by an authority. For example, a university may issue a certificate to a student to show that they have completed the necessary work in order to graduate. The next question is, would you trust a physically certificate? Digital certificates work the same way. They are issued from an authority and the question becomes would you trust the authority that issued the certificate? Electronic certificates also contain other fields like who or what the certificate was issued to, how long it is valid, the public key and the digital signature. If a digital certificate is presented to a user or computer, the user or computer is able to check the certificate to ensure the person using it should be using it. Also the certificate contains a digital signature which allows the certificate to be checked to make sure it has not been modified. Digital Signature A digital signature provides a method for a certificate to be checked to ensure it has not been modified. In order to do this, a hash value is created for the certificate. To generate a hash value the certificate is put through a function to create a single value. Hash functions are designed so different certificates will not produce the same value, however the hash value cannot be used to generate the original certificate. The same principal applies to a person's fingerprints. They can be used to identify a person, however using a finger print you could not work out the features of a person like what color hair they have. When a certificate is created, the hash value for that certificate is also created. Using a function involving the private key, a digital signature is created and added to the certificate. Digital Signature Example When a certificate is used, in order to check the certificate has not been changed, the following is done: The computer generates the hash value for the certificate. Next, the digital signature is put through a function using the public key which should result in the same hash value. If both values match, the certificate has not been modified. This prevents a 3rd party taking a certificate, changing the values in the certificate and using the certificate. Trust Model Certificates work off a trust model. An example of a trust model in computers is that a computer may have a sticker on it indicating which operating systems it will run. The consumer, seeing this sticker, must trust that the manufacture would not put this sticker on the laptop unless it will run that operating system. The customer must also trust the creator of that operating system would not allow a computer manufacturer to put a sticker on a computer that would not run that operating system. Certificate Trust Model Certificates are generally deployed in a hierarchy. At the top is the root certificate authority. This can be an internal Certificate Authority or an external authority like VeriSign. When an authority like VeriSign issues a certificate, they will perform a number of checks on the individual purchasing the certificate to ensure that they are a valid business. When a certificate is used it can be checked to see which authority issued that certificate. In order for the certificate to be used, the computer must trust the authority that it was issued from. Authorities like VeriSign are trusted by default on most operating systems. Certificate Error If a certificate is presented to the computer and it is not trusted, the computer will generate an error asking if the users want to trust the certificate. It is up to the user to decide if they believe the certificate is valid. Certificate Hierarchy Certificates use a hierarchy. At the top is the root CA, below these are subordinate CA's. Any level can issue certificates to subordinate CA's or direct to users, computers or devices. If the user, computer or device trusts the root CA, then any certificate that is issued by any CA in the hierarchy will automatically be trusted and thus used by the client. References "MCTS 70-640 Configuring Windows Server 2008 Active Directory Second edition" pg 771-775 "Public key certificate" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_key_certificate
Views: 302729 itfreetraining
Mathematics Of Cryptography | Lecture 3 - Cyclic Group | CRNS | Cryptography Basics
 
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In this youtube channel we are going to teach you the basic concepts of Cryptography and Network Security. In this lecture we are teaching about Cyclic Group , Sub Group , Generator.
Views: 1770 Quick Trixx
What is asymmetric encryption?
 
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In symmetric key encryption the same key is used for both encryption and decryption. In contrast, in asymmetric key encryption a public key (known to everyone) is used for encryption and a private key (known only to the recipient) is used for decryption. Many asymmetric key encryption approaches are based on factoring as a trapdoor function, with the public key being the multiple of the two secret primes and the private key being the two secret primes. Asymmetric key encryption allows one party to encrypt a message to a second party they have never communicated with previously. Credits: Talking: Geoffrey Challen (Assistant Professor, Computer Science and Engineering, University at Buffalo). Producing: Greg Bunyea (Undergraduate, Computer Science and Engineering, University at Buffalo). Part of the https://www.internet-class.org online internet course. A blue Systems Research Group (https://blue.cse.buffalo.edu) production.
Views: 518 internet-class
SHA-1 (Secure hash Algorithm) working in English  | CSS series
 
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Take the full crash course of Cryptography and Security System for free at Last moment tuitions Full course : https://lastmomenttuitions.com/course/cryptography-and-system-security/ Sample Notes :https://goo.gl/QpZPF5 For full hand made notes of Artificial Intelligence its only 100 rs payment options is PAYTM :9762903078 once we get payment notification we will mail you the notes on your email id contact us at :[email protected] whatsapp :9762903078 apko koi bhi doubt ho toh app humko direct email ya phone kar sakte ho Cryptography and security systems Series introduction to CSS: https://goo.gl/tjrh1L security goals and mechanism:https://goo.gl/uq35hP symmetric cipher:https://goo.gl/KFxF9j Substitution cipher and its types:https://goo.gl/MKmPzk Transposition cipher:https://goo.gl/uHqD7i diffie -hellman: https://goo.gl/YrskC5 RSA Algorithm:https://goo.gl/KwzCBF Kerberos:https://goo.gl/MQPgzw IDEA algorithm : https://goo.gl/PTCqFH Dos and DDos attack: https://goo.gl/8T345G SQL injection:https://goo.gl/bcVHnw SHA-1 vs MD5 :https://goo.gl/QJBhJD chalo toh public bus pass hojao aur share karo videos ko whatsapp group apne last moment pe unn dosto ko jo apni tarah last moment pe padhte hai Aur videos CSS ke aane waale hai so Channel ko subscribe jaroor karna follow us on: https://www.instagram.com/last_moment_tuitions https://www.facebook.com/lastmomenttuition https://www.facebook.com/sumerr3
Views: 37328 Last moment tuitions
Symmetric Cryptosystems - Applied Cryptography
 
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This video is part of an online course, Applied Cryptography. Check out the course here: https://www.udacity.com/course/cs387.
Views: 8745 Udacity
RSA Cryptosystem - Applied Cryptography
 
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This video is part of an online course, Applied Cryptography. Check out the course here: https://www.udacity.com/course/cs387.
Views: 1783 Udacity
Public Key Cryptography: Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange (short version)
 
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This is a segment of this full video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEBfamv-_do Diffie-Hellman key exchange was one of the earliest practical implementations of key exchange within the field of cryptography. It relies on the discrete logarithm problem. This test clip will be part of the final chapter of Gambling with Secrets!
Views: 435501 Art of the Problem
22. Cryptography: Encryption
 
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MIT 6.046J Design and Analysis of Algorithms, Spring 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/6-046JS15 Instructor: Srinivas Devadas In this lecture, Professor Devadas continues with cryptography, introducing encryption methods. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 14597 MIT OpenCourseWare
DEF CON 24 Crypto and Privacy Village - David Wong - How to Backdoor Diffie-Hellman
 
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Lately, several backdoors in cryptographic constructions, protocols and implementations have been surfacing in the wild: Dual-EC in RSA's B-Safe product, a modified Dual-EC in Juniper's operating system ScreenOS and a non-prime modulus in the open-source tool socat. Many papers have already discussed the fragility of cryptographic constructions not using nothing-up-my-sleeve numbers, as well as how such numbers can be safely picked. However, the question of how to introduce a backdoor in an already secure, safe and easy to audit implementation has so far rarely been researched (in the public). BIO: David Wong (Twitter: @lyon01_david) is a Security Consultant at the Cryptography Services team of NCC Group. He has been working in Security for over a year now, being part of several publicly funded open source audits such as the OpenSSL and the Let's Encrypt ones. He has conducted research in many domains in cryptography, publishing whitepapers as well as writing numerous editions of the Cryptography Services private bulletin. He has been a trainer for cryptography courses at BlackHat US 2015 and BlackHat US 2016.
Views: 3232 DEFCONConference
How to Change Amazon Web Services EC2 Key Pair
 
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What do you do when you lose your Amazon Web Services AWS EC2 Key Pair? AWS EC2 only allows you to download EC2 Key Pairs once, and that's that. But there's a neat trick to getting back access to your AWS EC2 instance. Moba Xterm: http://mobaxterm.mobatek.net/download.html Amazon Web Services site: http://aws.amazon.com/ Commands that I use in the tutorial: cd C:/ cd Users/huyle/Downloads ls -lah chmod 600 personal-website.pem chown :Users personal-website.pem ssh -i personal-website.pem [email protected] sudo fdisk -l sudo mount /dev/xvdf1 /mnt cp ~/.ssh/authorized_keys /mnt/home/ubuntu/.ssh/authorized_keys sudo umount /mnt Twitter: https://twitter.com/microwavesam Blog: http://slothparadise.com Consider supporting our group in making stuff: ►https://www.patreon.com/slothparadise ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/slothparadise_
Views: 22157 MicrowaveSam
Elliptic Curve (ECC) with example - Cryptography lecture series
 
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In this lecture series, you will be learning about cryptography basic concepts and examples related to it. Elliptic Curve (ECC) with example (ECC) with example.
Views: 8210 Eezytutorials
Cryptography and Network Security - Digital Signature Algorithm(DSA) - GATE(CSE)
 
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The complete YouTube playlist can be viewed here: https://goo.gl/mjyDev This lesson explains the concept of Digital Signature Algorithm(DSA), under the course, "Cryptography and Network Security for GATE Computer Science Engineering". The lesson illustrated the concept of the Digital Signature Algorithm(DSA), RSA approach to digital signature and DSS approach to the digital signature. Some important terminology and concepts are also illustrated, for the better understanding of the subject. For the entire course: https://goo.gl/aTMBNZ For more lessons by Ansha Pk: https://goo.gl/2DX9Wn Must watch for all the GATE/ESE/PSU Exams. Download the Unacademy Learning App from the Google Play Store here:- https://goo.gl/02OhYI Download the Unacademy Educator app from the Google Play Store here: https://goo.gl/H4LGHE Do Subscribe and be a part of the community for more such lessons here: https://goo.gl/UGFo7b Visit Our Facebook Group on GATE here: https://goo.gl/cPj5sb Cryptography and Network Security - Digital Signature Algorithm(DSA) - GATE(CSE)
2005-02-23 CERIAS - Perturbation of Multivariable Public-key Cryptosystems
 
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Recorded: 02/23/2005 CERIAS Security Seminar at Purdue University Perturbation of Multivariable Public-key Cryptosystems Jintai Ding, University of Cincinnati Public key cryptography is an indispensable part of most modern communication systems. However, quantum computers can break cryptosystems like RSA, which are based on Jintai Ding is currently an associate professor in Department of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Cincinnati. He received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from Yale in 1995. He received the Zhong Jia Qing prize from the Chinese Mathematical Society in 1990 and the Sloan Dissertation Fellowship in 1994-1995. Before he moved to Cincinnati in 1998, he worked as a lecturer at the Research Institute of Mathematical Sciences of Kyoto University in Japan for three years. His early works are in quantum groups and in the last few years, his main interest is in the area of the multivariable public key cryptosystems. (Visit: www.cerias.purude.edu)
Views: 162 ceriaspurdue
Python3 Advanced Tutorial 10 - PyCrypto
 
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This is a tutorial on PyCrypto, looking at encrypting and decrypting files using AES-256. All Links and Slides will be in the description. Subscribe for more cool stuff! Slides & files - https://www.mediafire.com/folder/blqyh7qotgu2r/Tutorial_10_-_PyCrypto Python - http://python.org/ Ubuntu - http://www.ubuntu.com/ Steam Group: http://steamcommunity.com/groups/DrapsTV Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrapsTV Ello: https://ello.co/drapstv If you like what you see be sure to subscribe and thumbs up!
Views: 22351 DrapsTV
Cryptography and privacy. An easy explanation on how to create a key for encryption.
 
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Cryptography is the base for most of our communications online. It's what keeps your messages and your activities private. In this video we explain how cryptography encodes your message using a key and exactly how this key works.
Views: 7790 MinuteVideos
Public Key Infrastructure
 
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To understand how Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) provides a safe and reliable environment for electronic transactions on the Internet, please watch this episode. To learn more about data protection, please visit the InfoSec website at: http://www.infosec.gov.hk
Introduction to Learning With Errors (LWE) - Quantum Robust Public Key
 
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http://asecuritysite.com/encryption/lwe Here is the Python code: import sys import numpy as np import random public_key=[] vals = [5, 8, 12, 16, 2, 6, 11, 3, 7, 10] s = 5 e = 12 message = 1 file='1111' val=0 for x in range(0,len(vals)): public_key.append(vals[x]*s+e) print "Message to send:",message print "Random values:",vals print "-----------------------\n" res = random.sample(public_key, len(public_key)/2) print "Public key",public_key print "Selected values",res sum = np.sum(res) print 'Sum is:',sum if (message==1): sum=sum+1 print 'Encrypted is:',sum rem = sum % s if (rem%2==0): print 'Message received is 0' else: print 'Message received is 1'
Views: 1012 Bill Buchanan OBE
RSA code made easy
 
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The solution to a typical exam question. For more on step 4 see Euclid's algorithm made easy. See my other videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmtelDcX6c-xSTyX6btx0Cw/.
Views: 67445 Randell Heyman
Private and Public Key [BlockChain]
 
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This video is part of BlockChain education programme running at AKG Engineering College, India by DLTEdTech. Email us @ [email protected] for Corporate, Individual or Group BlockChain training. Presented By Neeraj S Srivastava, Umesh Singh Kushwaha, Ajay Singh & Gaurav Agarwal Sponsored by: http://dltlabs.io Disclaimer: BlockChain technology is changing and evolving very rapidly. Presenter or the company is not responsible for the correctness of the information presented in the video in current time.
Views: 3435 DLT Labs
The Diffie-Hellman-Merkle Key Exchange
 
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Produced to support Teaching Activity group project for COMP6046, MSc Web Science, Semester 1, 2013/14 - University of Southampton.
Views: 5686 zemediatube