Home
Search results “Metal mining environmental effects on health”
How Does Mining Affect the Environment? You'll Be Shocked to Know
 
03:40
Find more effects of mining right here: http://www.buzzle.com/articles/how-does-mining-affect-the-environment.html Mining is the source of all the substances that cannot be obtained by industrial processes or through agriculture. Mining reaps huge profits for the companies that own them and provides employment to a large number of people. It is also a huge source of revenue for the government. Despite its economic importance, the effects of mining on the environment is a pressing issue. Mining activities require the clearing of large areas of land. The chemicals used in the mining process often escape into the environment causing pollution. Watch this video to know how mining affects the environment.
Views: 11824 Buzzle
The Enviromental Impact of mining
 
05:18
A 10th grade science project
Views: 10164 MinecraftandXton
Quarrying - economic, environmental and social effects | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
05:43
Learn the basics about quarrying, its economic advantages and disadvantages concerning environment and healthy living. What is quarrying? and how does it affect us and our environment? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
11 Worst Pollutants in the World
 
08:22
Here are the 11 worst pollutants and the ones that have the most negative effects on the environment like slag and oil spill disaster. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 5. Slag No, that is not Nickelodeon getting rid of their leftover slime. What’s being dumped is slag. Slag is the leftover materials from ore after the desired material has already been extracted. Slag dumping was generally considered safe until recently. It has even commonly been repurposed for the process of creating cement. However, recent studies reveal that the leftover slag could be producing toxic levels of arsenic, lead, cadmium, barium, zinc and copper. The gradual weathering of the slag can pollute everything surrounding it, including the water and air. This isn’t all slag, though, the harmful effects are mostly caused by slag that is left over from refining copper, zinc, cadmium and other base metals. 4. Untreated Sewage Sewage isn’t really something that most people like to think about, but that doesn’t stop it from being a big problem. The untreated sewage contains human feces and wastewater that, obviously, have some pretty damaging effects. Raw sewage is often dumped into water supplies in poor areas of the world because there isn’t much of an alternative. Besides causing a plethora of dangerous diseases, the waste also destroys ecosystems and lowers the oxygen contents so that no life can survive in the water. The World Health Organization estimates that 2.6 billion people were affected by raw sewage dumping because there was no other way to dispose of it. WHO is making strides in extending access to modern sewage treatment to the communities that most need it. 3. Oil With the highly publicized BP Deepwater Horizon, the oil spill that happened in 2010 and is still affecting the United States and the Gulf of Mexico, the dangers of oil drilling is more well known than ever. The 580 tons of oil that were spilled wasn’t even the biggest oil spill in the world. Not even close. The biggest happened in Kuwait in 1991 when 136,000 tons of oil was spilled. Oil can devastate the local marine life. Oil is especially dangerous to animals with feathers or heavy fur because the oil can insulate them and make them more vulnerable to temperature, especially hypothermia, and reduce their buoyancy. Almost all of the birds affected by oil spills die without human intervention. Some studies say that oil spills are happening less, but that has been disputed. There has still been 9,351 accidental oil spill since 1974 and each one means that the surrounding ecosystem needs decades to recover from the accident. 2. Gold Mining Gold is pretty. It’s the gold standard for jewelry and that pun was most definitely intended. Our country was practically founded because of it. There are two processes for mining the mineral, though, and both are insanely dangerous. The two process are the cyanide process, which is the most common today, and the mercury process. It pretty obvious that with names like that it’s going to be dangerous. Cyanide is incredibly poisonous in tiny quantities and there have been massive cyanide spills throughout time because of the industry. The cyanide leaks have been known to poison fish in local rivers for long stretches. These leaks are considered by many to be massive environmental disasters. There is also a ton of waste produced from the mining. Thirty tons of ore are disposed of for every half pound of gold mined. The ore dumps also have major levels of cadmium, lead, zinc, arsenic, selenium and mercury. The danger of these dumps is second only to the danger of radioactive waste dumps. 1.Radiation Radioactive waste didn’t become a real problem until the birth of the nuclear power plant. Most of the radioactive waste that the world has is caused by nuclear fission or nuclear technology. The waste is maintained by the government, but leaks have been known to happen. The most notable cases of radiation damage can be found in Chernobyl. The leak happened in 1986 and the site still isn’t considered safe. Radiation decays over time, though, so this problem is more manageable than other items on this list. If the radioactive waste is contained for the right amount of time, then it can be more safely disposed of. Without proper containment, though, the radiation can lead to death and various cancers. There are also dangers to future generations as well because it has been documented that radiation can cause severe birth defects.
Views: 2319141 Talltanic
Environmental issues of metallic mining
 
02:33
Mining for metals has many ill effects on the environment. Here are just a few to open your eyes to the consequences of living a life with commodities. Also I don't claim the rights to any of the images/ text/ music in this video.
Views: 1226 MclovelyWoWinc
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF MINING
 
31:47
Subject :GEOLOGY Course :ENERGY RESOURCES AND MINERAL EXPLORATIONS Keyword : SWAYAMPRABHA
Insight: Rare–earth metals
 
12:19
Did you know the smooth running of almost every piece of technology you use - is down to something called a rare-earth metal? The Insight team ask why a monopolised market is causing global concern. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7fWeaHhqgM4Ry-RMpM2YYw?sub_confirmation=1 Livestream: http://www.youtube.com/c/trtworld/live Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTWorld Twitter: https://twitter.com/TRTWorld Visit our website: http://www.trtworld.com/
Views: 7854 TRT World
Toxic Heavy Metal Contamination
 
21:21
http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com/medicardium.html Toxic heavy metal contamination is so pervasive in our environment that it is no longer a question of whether one has been exposed to toxins, but rather the level of exposure. In most cases damage to your system can be reversed and any further harm can be prevented by removing the metals. The process of removing toxic heavy metals from the body is useful in all chronic diseases and for those wishing to stay well and healthy. I have seen the incredible health benefits in my patients when they remove these harmful toxins from their bodies. http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com/store http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com/store/medicardium.html
Views: 93 Martina Santiago
Lead Exposure Risks in the Work Environment
 
03:54
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) reports that while many people worry about lead in their homes or in the environment, for some the workplace may offer the greatest potential for exposure. Lead is a toxic heavy metal. It can be combined with other metals to produce alloys. Lead and lead alloys are often used to make batteries, ammunition and other metal products. In the past, lead was also used regularly in fuel, paint, ceramics, caulk, pipes and solder among other things. Due to potential health issues from exposure, the amount of lead used in these products today has lessened or has been removed. Though used less often, NIOSH reports that lead is still common in many industries, including construction, mining and manufacturing. In these and other industries, workers can be at risk of being exposed to lead, by breathing it, ingesting it or coming in contact with it. NIOSH provides the following information for workers about how lead exposure can occur: • Workers can be exposed by breathing-in lead fumes or lead dust. Lead fumes are produced during metal processing, when metal is being heated or soldered. Lead dust is produced when metal is being cut or when lead paint is sanded or removed. Lead fumes and lead dust do not have an odor, so workers may not know they are being exposed. • Lead dust can settle on food, water, clothes and other objects. If a worker eats, drinks or smokes in areas where lead is being processed or stored, they could ingest it. Not washing one’s hands before eating or touching one’s mouth are also ways it could be ingested. • Workers can also be exposed by coming into contact with lead dust. Some studies have found lead can be absorbed through skin. Workers that handle lead and then touch their eyes, nose or mouth, could be exposed. Lead dust can also get on clothes and hair. If this happens, it’s possible that a worker could track home some of the lead dust, which may also expose their family. These are just a few things to know about lead exposure risks in the work environment. To learn more about this or other occupational, indoor air quality, health, safety or property issues, please visit the websites shown on the screen. Clark Seif Clark http://www.csceng.com EMSL Analytical, Inc. http://www.emsl.com LA Testing http://www.latesting.com Zimmetry Environmental http://www.zimmetry.com Healthy Indoors Magazine http://www.iaq.net Hudson Douglas Public Adjusters http://HudsonDouglasPublicAdjusters.com VOETS - Verification, Operations and Environmental Testing Services, LLC http://www.voetsnyc.com
Views: 4347 Paul Cochrane
Impact of Surface and Strip Mining in 60 Seconds
 
01:01
8th grade video project: What is the impact of surface/strip mining on the environment?
Views: 35 OLPHCougars
Environmental damage from mining in Jamaica-11 June 08
 
02:37
Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Environmentalists are arguing that the bauxite mining industry in Jamaica is having a devastating impact on the environment and surrounding eco-systems. It is also posing serious health problems for local communities. The sun baked sludge contains heavy metals and other pollutants. Al Jazeera's Anand Naidoo reports from central Jamaica. At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts
Views: 27422 Al Jazeera English
5 Human Impacts on the Environment: Crash Course Ecology #10
 
10:38
Hank gives the run down on the top five ways humans are negatively impacting the environment and having detrimental effects on the valuable ecosystem services which a healthy biosphere provides. Like Crash Course? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse T*mbl Crash Course: http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Table of Contents Ecosystem Services 00:51 The Importance of Biodiversity 04:07 Deforestation 06:42 Desertification 06:49 Global Warming 07:59 Invasive Species 08:51 Overharvesting 09:20 Crash Course/SciShow videos referenced in this episode: Hydrologic and Carbon Cycles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2D7hZpIYlCA Nitrogen and Phosphorus Cycles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leHy-Y_8nRs Ecological Succession: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZKIHe2LDP8 Climate Change: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2Jxs7lR8ZI Invasive Species: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDOwTXobJ3k Food Shortage: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPLJP84xL9A References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-3n5P Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1073629 CrashCourse
Mining
 
06:51
019 - Mining In this video Paul Andersen explains how mining is used to extract valuable minerals from the Earth's crust. Surface and subsurface mining are used to extract ore which is then processed. A discussion of ecosystem impacts and legislation is also included. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Intro Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License Outro Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Cateb, M. (2010). Português: Cobre e latão para soldas. Lingote de prata 950 e chapa de prata. Liga para ser adicionada à prata, com cobre e germânio. Grânulos de prata fina. Foto : Mauro Cateb, joalheiro brasileiro. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Metals_for_jewellery.jpg English: Anthracite coal. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_anthracite.jpg File:MKingHubbert.jpg. (2011, September 13). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:MKingHubbert.jpg&oldid=450215564 Jones, N. (2007). English: Sand and gravel strata on the southern edge of Coxford Wood The sand and gravel quarry goes right up to the edge of wood. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sand_and_gravel_strata_on_the_southern_edge_of_Coxford_Wood_-_geograph.org.uk_-_610732.jpg Jyi1693. (2006). English: Seawater photographed from aboard the MV Virgo out of Singapore, 2006. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sea_water_Virgo.jpg KVDP. (2009). English: A schematic showing the locations of certain ores in the world. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Simplified_world_mining_map_1.png printer, -G. F. Nesbitt & Co. (1850). English: Sailing card for the clipper ship California, depicting scenes from the California gold rush. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:California_Clipper_500.jpg USA, G. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Italiano: Grafico che rappresenta il picco di Hubbert della produzione petrolifera mondiale. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hubbert_world_2004.svg Vance, R. H. (1850). English: “Photomechanical reproduction of the 1850(?) daguerreotype by R. H. Vance shows James Marshall standing in front of Sutter’s sawmill, Coloma, California, where he discovered gold.” Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sutters_Mill.jpg
Views: 62485 Bozeman Science
Eco-Rehabilitation of Biodiversity in Forest Destroyed by Gold Miners - TvAgro by Juan Gonzalo Angel
 
22:42
Twitter @juangangel The environmental impact of mining includes erosion, formation of sinkholes, loss of biodiversity, and contamination of soil, groundwater, surface water by chemicals from mining processes. In some cases, additional forest logging is done in the vicinity of mines to increase the available room for the storage of the created debris and soil. Besides creating environmental damage, the contamination resulting from leakage of chemicals also affect the health of the local population. Mining companies in some countries are required to follow environmental and rehabilitation codes, ensuring the area mined is returned to close to its original state. Some mining methods may have significant environmental and public health effects. Nuss and Eckelman (2014) provide an overview of the life-cycle wide environmental impacts of metals production associated with 62 metals in year 2008. Erosion of exposed hillsides, mine dumps, tailings dams and resultant siltation of drainages, creeks and rivers can significantly impact the surrounding areas, a prime example being the giant Ok Tedi Mine in Papua New Guinea. In areas of wilderness mining may cause destruction and disturbance of ecosystems and habitats, and in areas of farming it may disturb or destroy productive grazing and croplands. In urbanised environments mining may produce noise pollution, dust pollution and visual pollution. The implantation of a mine is a major habitat modification, and smaller perturbations occurs on an larger scale than exploitation site, mine-waste residuals contamination of the environment for example. Adverse effects can be observed long after the end of the mine activity. Destruction or drastic modification of the original site and anthropogenic substances release can have majors impact on biodiversity in the area. Destruction of the habitat is the main component of biodiversity losses, but direct poisoning caused by mine extracted material, and indirect poisoning through food and water can also affects animals, vegetals and microorganisms. Habitat modification such as pH and temperature modification disturb communities in the area. Endemics species are especially sensitive, since they need really specific environmental conditions. Destruction or slight modification of their habitat put them at the risk of extinction. Habitats can be damaged when there is no enough terrestrial as well by non-chemicals products, such as large rocks from the mines that are discarded in the surrounding landscape with no concern for impacts on natural habitat. Concentration of heavy metals are known to decrease with distance from the mine, and effects on biodiveristy follow the same pattern. Impacts can vary a lot depending on mobility and bioavailability of the contaminant : less mobile molecules will stay inert in the environment while highly mobile molecules will easily move into another compartment or be taken up by organisms. For example, speciation of metals in sediments could modify their bioavailability, and thus their toxicity for aquatic organisms. Bioaccumulation plays an important role in polluted habitats : mining impacts on biodiversity should be, assuming that concentration levels are not high enough to directly kill exposed organisms, greater on the species on top of the food chain because of this phenomenon. Adverse mining effects on biodiversity depends on a great extend on the nature of the contaminant, the level of concentration at which it can be found in the environment, and on the nature of the ecosystem itself. Some species are really resistant to anthropogenic disturbances, while some other will completely disappear from the contaminated zone. Time alone does not seem to allow the habitat to recover completely from the contamination. Remediation takes time, and in most of the cases will not enable the recovery of the diversity present before the mining activity. Source https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_impact_of_mining Juan Gonzalo Angel www.tvagro.tv
Views: 3417 TvAgro
Are Electric Cars Actually Better For The Environment?
 
04:38
Scientists have found that electric cars might not be as green as we thought. How could this be? There’s A Car That’s Powered By Salt Water! ►►►►http://bit.ly/1S8xAyu Sign Up For The TestTube Newsletter Here ►►►► http://bit.ly/1myXbFG Watch River Monsters Here ►►►► http://bit.ly/1SDplaR Read More: Cleaner Cars From Cradle to Grave http://www.ucsusa.org/sites/default/files/attach/2015/11/Cleaner-Cars-from-Cradle-to-Grave-full-report.pdf “This report compares battery-electric vehicles (BEVs) with similar gasoline vehicles by examining their global warming emissions over their “life cycles”—from the raw materials to make the car through manufacturing, driving, and disposal or recycling. Toward that end, we performed up-to date assessments of the carbon footprints of BEVs, taking into account the latest information about electricity generation and BEV models.” Tesla’s Electric Cars Aren’t As Green As You Might Think http://www.wired.com/2016/03/teslas-electric-cars-might-not-green-think/ “But how green is a Tesla, really? Devonshire Research Group, an investment firm that specializes in valuing tech companies, dug into the data and concluded that Tesla’s environmental benefits may be more hyped than warranted. Devonshire isn’t saying that Tesla is pulling a Volkswagen, or that its cars are spewing greenhouse gases from invisible tailpipes. It’s arguing that Teslas (and, by extension, all electric vehicles) create pollution and carbon emissions in other ways.” How Green Are Electric Cars? Depends on Where You Plug In http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/15/automobiles/how-green-are-electric-cars-depends-on-where-you-plug-in.html?_r=1 “According to a report that the Union of Concerned Scientists plans to release on Monday, there would be a considerable difference in the amount of greenhouse gases — primarily carbon dioxide — that result from charging the cars’ battery packs. By trapping heat, greenhouse gases contribute to climate change.” ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Lissette Padilla on Twitter https://twitter.com/lizzette DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq Sign Up For The TestTube Mailing List: http://dne.ws/1McUJdm
Views: 205452 Seeker
E-waste: Why We Need to Act Now
 
04:16
An educational video about e-waste that can be used to introduce others about what e-waste is and its effects on the environment and each other Many of the photos and information used in this video were from other sources which I give credit to in the following Works Cited list: Works Cited Aragon, Liz. Diverse People Raising Hands. 2012. Diverse People Raising Hands. Web. 15 Apr. 2016. Byer, Renee C. N.d. Ghana, West Africa. The Selects: Living on a Dollar a Day. Web. 14 Apr. 2016. Charleston, Emma. N.d. Emma Charleston: Rubbish. Web. 06 Apr. 2016. Chung, Chien Min. N.d. Guiyu, China. Guiyu, China E-waste. Web. 15 Apr. 2016. Concept Draw. N.d. Advertising - Vector Stencils Library. Web. 16 Apr. 2016. Eduplusswf. ""POLLUTION" Animated Educational Video with Lyrics and Sound." YouTube. YouTube, 22 Feb. 2015. Web. 10 Apr. 2016. "Electronic Waste." WHO | Electronic Waste. WHO, n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2016. Electronics Take Back Coalition. "E-WASTE: The Exploding Global Electronic Waste Crisis." Web. Empa. "Hazardous Substances in E-Waste." A Knowledge Base for the Sustainable Recycling of E-Waste. Empa, n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2016. Friedman, Philip. 2009. TV Cleaning Tips - How to. Web. 12 Apr. 2016. The Guardian. "Digital debris: The toxic path of electronic waste video." Web. 2011 GDJ. 2012. Clipart - Sinister Smiley Face. Web. 16 Apr. 2016. Li, Yuan Chun., and Banci Lian. Wang. E-waste: Management, Types and Challenges. New York: Nova Science, 2012. Print. N.d. The 1-2-3 Breathe-play M. Web. 12 Apr. 2016. N.d. Clipart - TV in Trash. By Liftarn. Web. 10 Apr. 2016. N.d. Electronic Circuit Design. Web. 08 Apr. 2016. N.d. Free Vector Graphic: Fists, Sky, Red, Black. Web. 19 Apr. 2016. N.d. Handheld Clip Art Download. Web. 06 Apr. 2016. N.d. Money Pictures Clip Art. Web. 16 Apr. 2016. N.d. NG Microsystems | Home. Web. 06 Apr. 2016. N.d. School Teacher Clip Art. Web. 15 Apr. 2016. OntarioEStewardship. "RYE EducationTour - 2015." YouTube. YouTube, 11 June 2015. Web. 20 Apr. 2016. Recycle Your Electronics. "Electronics Recycling | Recycle Your Electronics." RecycleYourElectronicsca. Ontario Electronic Stewardship, 2015. Web. 19 Apr. 2016. Rey, David. N.d. ROYALTY-FREE (RF) CLIPART ILLUSTRATION OF A BLACK AND WHITE LITTLE BOY DRINKING FROM A CUP BY DAVID REY. Web. 10 Apr. 2016. TheIPMI. "Mining for Precious Metals Explained: Gold, Silver, Platinum, Palladium." YouTube. YouTube, 23 Jan. 2014. Web. 15 Apr. 2016. 311. "Welcome to the Three One One Toronto Website." Residential - Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE). City of Toronto, n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2016. 2014. People Talking Clip Art. Web. 18 Apr. 2016. WeirdKat. 2015. The Importance of Sleep. Web. 17 Apr. 2016. Wooddell, David W. "E-Waste." National Geographic Magazine - NGM.com. National Geographic, 18 June 2008. Web. 05 Feb. 2016.
Views: 19030 L Nguyen
El Salvador Approves Anti-Metal Mining Law
 
00:30
The Congress of El Salvador passed a law Wednesday prohibiting metal mining, considering that it is an industry that creates negative impacts on the environment and human health. https://videosenglish.telesurtv.net/video/652352/el-salvador-approves-anti-metal-mining-law/
Views: 188 TeleSUR English
Uranium
 
48:01
This documentary looks at the hazards of uranium mining in Canada. Toxic and radioactive waste pose environmental threats while the traditional economic and spiritual lives of the Aboriginal people who occupy this land have been violated. Given our limited knowledge of the associated risks, this film questions the validity of continuing the mining operations. I do not own any rights to the video. Uploaded for educational and information sharing purposes only.
Views: 117528 Tibor Roussou
Dam collapse creates environmental disaster in Brazil
 
01:19
On November 5, 2015, two dams holding millions of cubic meters of mining waste gave way – launching one of the worst environmental disasters in Brazilian history. Mud – full of dangerous metals – quickly overtook the nearby mining community of Mariana in Minas Gerais state. At least seventeen people were killed. Hundreds more have been displaced by the wall of sludge released in the dam collapse. Music: Echoes of Time by Kevin MacLeod
Views: 113769 Greenpeace International
A Commitment to the Mining Industry
 
08:31
Today, the demand for mined materials is greater than at any other time in history. World development and increased urbanization are driving sustained dependence on minerals, metals and coal. Energy usage is expected to increase significantly in the coming decades—placing even more emphasis on supply, security, cost and environmental impact issues. As the demand for commodities grows, mining companies need a partner to support them in their efforts. A partner who understands the issues important to the mining industry — like safety, sustainability and productivity. And a partner with the equipment, technologies, end-to-end services and solutions to support their operations. Caterpillar is committed to being that partner.
Beneath the Surface: The Impacts of Mining
 
09:16
N-Map created the Beneath the Surface series to inform rural communities facing mining about their rights, and empower them with legally sound strategies for protecting themselves. Each video in the series features a relevant story from a different community around the world, exposing the environmental and human devastation caused by mining, while highlighting a successful community driven tactic for fighting the powerful multinational corporations responsible.
Gold miners exposed to harmful health effects through mercury poisoning
 
07:08
It has become the talk of town after Interior Cabinet Secretary Dr.Fred Matiang’i revealed traces of the precious but dangerous metal in a consignment of contraband sugar impounded in Eastleigh.   Mention the word mercury and it will arouse the attention of every Kenyans. Joy Kiruki visited the gold mines in Migori and tells us how  the use of mercury in the extractive industry is has the health of women working in the mines and the surrounding environment.
Views: 109 Maxx Kenya
Dr. Michael McCawley: Health Impacts of Ultrafine Particles from Surface Mining - March 28, 2015
 
35:03
Dr. Michael McCawley's presentation " Public Health Impacts of Ultrafine Particle Exposure from Appalachian Surface Mines", filmed on March 28, 2015, at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Charleston, West Virginia. Hosted by the Kanawha Forest Coalition http://www.kanawhaforestcoalition.org http://www.facebook.com/kanawhaforestcoalition "Public Health Impacts of Ultrafine Particle Exposure from Appalachian Surface Mines: An Evidence-Based Foundation for Policy Development" Dr. McCawley graduated with a bachelor's degree in Zoology from George Washington University. He received his master's degree in Environmental Engineering from West Virginia University and a doctorate in Environmental Health from New York University. Dr. McCawley spent over 27 years as a Public Health Service Officer with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, studying miners’ health, occupational respiratory disease, aerosol measurement and ultrafine particles. While there he worked on projects concerning exposure to wood dust, volcanic ash, diesels, coal mine dust, silica and beryllium. He retired from the US Public Health Service in 2001. He has taught at WVU since 1979, with primary interests in air pollution, aerosols and occupational health. He has developed air sampling equipment and a pulmonary function test. Recently, he has been working on issues related to Marcellus Shale drilling and mountain top mining.
Environmental issues caused by Stone mining - Thisaigal  (Promo)
 
00:31
Environmental issues caused by Stone mining - Thisaigal (Promo) CLICK THE LINK BELOW FOR LATEST NEWS UPDATES http://www.athavannews.com/ Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/Athavannews Twitter page https://twitter.com/AthavanNews
Views: 106 Athavan News
Impact of mining
 
00:56
Views: 72 War on Want
Profits Over People: Mining Ruins Lives in Malawi
 
05:44
Malawi’s government has failed to protect the rights and livelihoods of people living in nascent mining communities, Human Rights Watch said today in a report released on eve of the International Right to Know Day. Families living near coal and uranium mining operations face serious problems with water, food, and housing, and are left in the dark about health and other risks from mining. The 96-page report, “‘They Destroyed Everything’: Mining and Human Rights in Malawi,” examines the impact of extractive industries on communities in some of Malawi’s first mining areas, in Karonga district located on the northwestern shores of Lake Malawi. Malawi’s government has promoted private investment in mining and resource extraction to diversify its economy. But environmental risks are common in resource extraction and mining significantly contributes to climate change, which in turn affects governments’ ability to realize the rights to health, water, and food.
Views: 3351 HumanRightsWatch
Urban Mining: Environmental Altlas of Europe
 
09:58
Electronic products can be seen as already existing resources in the global economy. It has become apparent that their importance to the economy is growing exponentially, especially in emerging economies. Today a lot of international electronic waste ends up in India illegally, where it is recycled through an unorganized sector around the major cities of the country. Here, the recycling of e-waste has immense value and the entire process functions like a mini-economy. However, there is a clear dilemma between the efficient economic model to the severely damaging effect that the unorganized recycling of e-waste has to the health of workers and on the environment. On a global scale, facts are that the in-use stock of metals in cities and in society are growing each year. More people need more houses, more transportation and more electrical devices like mobile phones, computers, kitchen appliances and other consumer goods. Most end-of-life products contain metals and minerals in higher concentrations than primary resources. These in-use stock of resources are the urban mines of the future.
Mining contamination and impacts on local communities in Bolivia
 
03:10
Chenoa Stock, Companionship Facilitator with Uniendos Manos por la Vida (UMAVIDA), PHP’s Joining Hands network in Bolivia, describes how mining contamination impacts communities in Bolivia and reduces their ability to grow the food they need, raise their livestock or access water that is essential for their survival. UMAVIDA is addressing these issues of environmental injustice through advocacy so that land, water, people and all God’s creation can be a gift for rich, poor, farmers, miners, companies and individuals again. Learn more about Joining Hands at https://www.presbyterianmission.org/ministries/joininghands/
Views: 748 2010PHP
Sulfur Dioxide & Exposure Concerns
 
04:08
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is one of a group of highly reactive gasses known as oxides of sulfur. It is a colorless gas with a pungent and suffocating odor. It is a common air pollutant found in many parts of the world. Much of the sulfur dioxide in the air comes from the burning of coal and oil at electric power plants. Other sources of sulfur dioxide come from industrial facilities that use coal or oil, petroleum refineries, cement manufacturing, metal mining and processing, paper pulp manufacturing and copper smelting. Trains, large ships and some diesel equipment may burn high sulfur fuels which also contributes to sulfur dioxide in the air. Sulfur dioxide has also been used as a food preservative and for food processing; as a disinfectant; for bleaching flour, fruit, grain, wood pulp, wool, textile fibers, wicker, gelatin and glue; and for making other chemicals. It is also used for wastewater treatment. Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides can react with precipitation, oxygen and other substances in the atmosphere to form acid rain. People can be exposed to sulfur dioxide outdoors by breathing polluted air. This is more likely to occur in the summer, when the sun and hot temperatures react with pollution to form smog. Natural pollution sources, such as plant decay and volcanoes can also expose people to this gas. People who live near or work in facilities that utilize sulfur dioxide or produce it as a by-product may also be exposed. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, “Breathing sulfur dioxide can irritate the nose, throat, and lungs, and cause coughing and shortness of breath. Short-term exposure to sulfur dioxide can cause stomach pain, menstrual disorders, watery eyes, inhibition of thyroid function, loss of smell, headache, nausea, vomiting, fever, convulsions, and dizziness.” They also report, “Short-term exposure to high levels of sulfur dioxide in the air can be life-threatening by causing breathing difficulties and obstructing airways, especially for people with lung disease. Long-term exposure to persistent levels of sulfur dioxide can cause chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and respiratory illness. It can also aggravate existing heart disease.” These are just a few things to know about sulfur dioxide, exposure risks and potential health concerns. To learn more about this or other indoor and outdoor air quality, health and safety, occupational or environmental issues, please visit the websites shown below. Clark Seif Clark http://www.csceng.com EMSL Analytical, Inc. http://www.emsl.com Indoor Environmental Consultants, Inc. http://www.iecinc.net LA Testing http://www.latesting.com Zimmetry Environmental http://www.zimmetry.com Healthy Indoors Magazine http://www.iaq.net Hudson Douglas Public Adjusters http://HudsonDouglasPublicAdjusters.com
Views: 20527 Paul Cochrane
Effects of Gold King Mine Spill
 
02:07
The Gold King Mine Spill occurred in August, 2015. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports that there could have been almost 900,000 pounds of metal dumped into the Animas River. Bill Carter, author of the book “Boom, Bust, Boom,” a book about copper mining, says that this spill has a permanent effect on the river in Colorado. Additionally, Carter says that mines in general have permanent effects on the environment around them, especially the aquifer. Carter also says that some of these are real issues because they are cancer-causing metals, such as arsenic and lead. These metals will settle and when a big rush of water or flood occurs that will stir the metals and bring them back to the surface. Carter first was interested in this issue when his yard in Bisbee, Ariz. was contaminated with arsenic and lead. After doing research of mines all around the world, he discovered that all mines have this problem. The problem with these mines is that there are talus piles that are not being taken care of and are a disaster waiting to happen.
Views: 115 NAZ Today
Environment & mining, Albania ASPBM
 
12:07
Environmental Festival Film, Albania, 2015 Film title: Environment and mining in Mati River springs, Krasta, Bulqize. The film aims to demonstrate the environmental impacts of chromium ore mines in Mati River springs at Krasta Region in Bulqiza district. In recent years the mining sector has been intensively developed but without environmental criteria. We want to raise the awareness the public and other stakeholders that such mining is destroying the environmental resources and society health and prospective. The legislation to prevent such impacts exists but must be enforced from authorities. The companies must take their environmental and social responsibility; Investing little today will save our future. Civil society and the public must put under pressure the enforcement authorities and raise their voice for such catastrophic situation. We hope that this short movie will scratch everybody conscience to help in the environmental protection. Thank you Albanian Society for Protection of Birds & Mammals
Views: 285 Klodian Aliu
Dangers of Mercury & How to Detox Your Body of It
 
20:44
https://ghc.us/1eu Are you being exposed to mercury? Find out how this affects your health and what you can do about it. In this 20 minute video, Dr. Group discusses the history of mercury, the dangers of mercury, how to detox the body of mercury, how you are exposed to it, and the environmental impact of mercury. ------- Dr. Edward Group III, DC, NP, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM is the founder and CEO of Global Healing Center. He assumes a hands-on approach to producing new and advanced life changing products and information to help you maintain a clean body and live a healthy lifestyle. It's our mission to bring back good health, positive thinking, happiness, and love. View Our Top Selling Products: https://www.globalhealingcenter.com?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=YouTube_201506_toxicmetalcleansekit_mercurydanger_Signature_ViewTopSelling Read our Health Articles: https://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=YouTube_201506_toxicmetalcleansekit_mercurydanger_Signature_Articles Read more about Dr. Group: https://www.globalhealingcenter.com/about/dr-group?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=YouTube_201506_toxicmetalcleansekit_mercurydanger_Signature_DrG Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GlobalHealingCenter/
Views: 35082 Global Healing Center
Heavy Metal Poisoning : A Toxic Lunch Part 2
 
04:45
http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com/medicardium.html http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com/products.html In Our Food Heavy metals in our diet are a serious threat. Here is one example: it is has been known for decades that Cadmium in our food is a health problem. Cadmium, which can cause kidney disease and cancer, is a natural part of the earth's crust. Its presence, though, in the wider environment is increased by human activity. Cadmium is used in the electroplating of other metals such as steel because it is especially resistant to corrosion. It is also used as a stabilizer in PVC plastics. It is a major component of rechargeable "NiCad" (Nickel-Cadmium) batteries. Cadmium is released into the environment through the mining and smelting of zinc, Lead and Copper, the combustion of coal, wood and oil, waste incineration and the application of phosphate fertilizers or sewage sludge to soil. Cadmium released into the air eventually settles on land, including land used for food production. As well, agricultural crops, such as potatoes, wheat, rice and other grains absorb Cadmium from their surrounding soils or directly through their leaves. So you see it is not difficult to determine how the contamination occurs and yet industry continues to release these toxic metals into the environment despite evidence that they reach our food supply. Another example is Lead: Negative effects may be caused by Lead at any concentration, especially in children. Lead is in prepared foods, fast foods, fats and oils and meat. Lead has no known biological function in humans. It is poorly absorbed by the body from the digestive system, though children can absorb Lead much more readily than adults. The slow rate at which it is eliminated from the body leads to a build up of this toxic heavy metal in the bones and red blood cells. http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com/blog/ http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com/Liver-GallBladder-Chemical-Detoxification.html
Views: 1065 liverbodydetox
Effects of mining: What's mine is not only ores
 
02:13
Mining maybe be beneficial but it has a lot of risks or side effects. The approach of the video may be a little bit comedic, but trust me, I'm darn serious about this one. And it may seem like I'm just playing around but this is no joke.
Views: 420 phetsoisa
Copper Mining
 
03:22
-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/youtube/ -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations. Resources: http://faculty.virginia.edu/metals/cases/dudgeon3.html http://www.greenspec.co.uk/building-design/copper-production-environmental-impact/ http://resources.schoolscience.co.uk/CDA/14-16/cumining/copch2pg3.html http://www.miningfacts.org/Environment/What-are-the-water-quality-concerns-at-mines-/
Views: 20 Selena2016123
3 Mineral Waters That Can Remove Aluminum from the Brain
 
08:49
http://www.realfarmacy.com/mineral-waters-remove-aluminum-from-brain/ 3 Mineral Waters That Can Remove Aluminum from the Brain by PAUL FASSA Aluminum poisoning head. There has been a dramatic increase in neurological diseases linked to aluminum toxicity. The blood brain barrier doesn’t stop aluminum’s intrusion into our gray matter. Aluminum accumulates and remains in tissue that doesn’t have a rapid cellular turnover. Apoptosis is the natural cell death and replacement process that occurs throughout the body, excluding cancer cells. Cancer cells keep reproducing and colonising into tumors unless apoptosis is introduced or the cells are outright killed from chemical compounds, both natural and synthetic. Aluminum accrues to toxic levels over time in slow apoptotic cell turnover tissues, such as bone matter, the heart and the brain. The brain and its associated nervous system is where diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, MS, chronic fatigue and other neurological or auto-immune diseases manifest, including the complete autistic spectrum, from learning disorders to full blown autism. There is no shortage of aluminum toxins in our environment. It’s in cookware, beverage containers, foil, cigarette smoke, cosmetics, antiperspirants, sunscreen, antacids, and those ubiquitous chemtrails that most ignore from which aluminum nanoparticles can be breathed into our lungs and routed directly into our blood or through the sinuses into our brains. Aluminum is in all vaccines. Injecting aluminum bypasses the possibility of eliminating it through normal channels. Straight into the blood it goes to be carried into the brain and heart, adding to their accumulated aluminum toxicity loads. According to Doctor Chris Exley, PhD, we have come into the aluminum age. Many trolling commentators love to explain how aluminum is the must common mineral on the planet and therefore it’s harmless. Dr. Exley has dedicated over two decades of his scientific life to researching aluminum toxicity. He calls the period of time from the early 20th Century to now the “Age of Aluminum.” Before then, aluminum remained in the ground as the most abundant mineral in earth that hadn’t yet been mined. Dr. Exley claims mining aluminum and using it in so many ways corresponds to the marked increase of neurological diseases. Doctor Chris Exley’s Message to the 2011 Vaccine Safety Conference A key aspect of his conference delivery concerned helping vaccinated kids improve their neurological damage. Ironically, it involves the second most abundant mineral in mother earth – silica. Exley has put kids who had autism spectrum disorders or other neurological damage from vaccinations on a form of silica known as silicic acid with excellent results. Silicic acid is basically oxygenated silica. Exley considers this the best and most bio-available way to get silica through the gut and into the blood, then into brain matter where it binds with the aluminum molecules and leads them out of brain cell tissue safely through the urine. He had used a Malasysian mineral water called Spritzer on aluminum toxic children suffering from autism spectrum disorders with significant success. Aluminum is in almost all vaccines. Later he and his team had 15 Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients use that water at the same rate of one liter per day for 13 weeks. Aluminum levels were lower by anywhere from 50 to 70 percent in all the subjects involved, and of the 15 AD patients, eight no longer deteriorated and three actually showed substantial cognitive increase. Perhaps coconut oil is better for reversing AD, but mineral waters high in Orthosilicic or ionic silicic acid will reduce aluminum toxicity in the brain to help ward off AD. The more USA accessible mineral waters with similar levels of silicic acid to Spritzer, which can volvic-water-triopenetrate the blood-brain barrier, are Volvic and Fiji. My personal favorite is Fiji because it has the highest level of ionic suspended silica as silicic acid and is the least expensive. I’ve seen it in WalMart at $1.99 per liter. Also, People’s Chemist Shane Ellison analyzed various water bottles and said Fiji water bottles are free of BPA and “its chemical cousins”. Others he rates highly as BPA free are Voss, Evian, and Smart Water. The suggested protocol is at least five days consuming a 1.5 liter bottle of water daily. More is required for high levels of aluminum toxicity. Dr. Exley considers drinking the whole bottle within an hour as the most efficient method of detoxing aluminum from the brain.
Views: 234731 Natural Remedies
Strip Mining For Environmental Science 2011-2022
 
05:52
Just about the basics of strip mining and its environmental effects
Views: 637 Caleb Cheung
How to Remove Heavy Metals from Your Body
 
11:40
How to Remove Heavy Metals from Your Body Coal mines and factories are not the only reservoirs of toxic environmental heavy metals – your body also makes the list. Heavy metals and metalloids occur naturally in the earth’s crust. They turn into environmental contaminants through activities like smelting, mining, coal burning and other industrial, agricultural and domestic production and use. Natural phenomena, such as volcanic eruptions and weathering, also cause heavy metal pollution. They are potentially toxic to humans, animals and the environment at large. Out of all heavy metals, exposure to lead, mercury, cadmium and arsenic is particularly harmful to human health, according to a 2003 study published in the British Medical Bulletin. The World Health Organization also lists the above-mentioned heavy metals among the top 10 most hazardous groups of chemicals to public health. Heavy metals enter our bodies in three ways: Inhalation: The air we breathe is polluted with heavy metals due to human activities and natural phenomena. Motor vehicles also emit airborne heavy metals. People working in factories, mines, industrial areas, paper-processing plants and nuclear power stations are especially susceptible to airborne heavy metals. Ingestion: Eating animal and plant-based food products is the primary source of human heavy metal contamination. Consumer and industrial waste can also pollute sources of water, such as lakes, rivers and streams. Absorption: Coming in contact with contaminated air or soil are major ways of absorbing heavy metals. The eyes and skin absorb several airborne heavy metals every day. Long-term exposure to heavy metals can prove carcinogenic over time, can severely damage the central nervous system and have fatal cardiovascular repercussions. Prolonged exposure to: Chromium and cadmium can cause lung cancer. Lead can cause anemia, palsy and kidney disorders. Mercury can lead to stomatitis (gum and mouth inflammation), tremor and neurotic disorders. Arsenic can cause hypopigmentation, diabetes and skin cancer. Heavy metal detoxification is vital to preserving your health and living a long life. Here’s how you can naturally remove heavy metals from your body. Note: Please bear in mind that heavy metal detoxification is a long process. While following the points in this article will significantly help the detoxification process, exposure to heavy metals is inevitable. You will need to consciously take steps to limit (if not avoid altogether) your exposure to these heavy metals while following the above-mentioned advice for maximum benefit.
MERCURY  EMMISIONS
 
03:16
United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) has released a report on mercury emissions and the effects to human health and the environment. The global mercury assessment 2013 report indicates that 260 Tones of mercury from the soil are being released to rivers and lakes. The report has also identified that small scale gold mining as well as coal are the major players towards mercury emissions with 3 million women and children globally being affected. UNEP has called for quick and efficient measures to be put in place by individual countries.
Views: 98 Gbs Kenya
METAL AND AN ANKYLO! | ARK: Pooping Evolved Pugnacia Island Gameplay/Let's Play E2
 
39:09
Join me on my adventures on ARK with my let's play ARK: Survival Evolved Modded gameplay! Mod Collection: https://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=1477874307 ARK: SURVIVAL EVOLVED POOPING EVOLVED PUGNACIA ISLAND As a man or woman stranded naked, freezing and starving on the shores of a mysterious island called ARK, you must hunt, harvest resources, craft items, grow crops, research technologies, and build shelters to withstand the elements. Use your cunning and resources to kill or tame & breed the leviathan dinosaurs and other primeval creatures roaming the land, and team up with or prey on hundreds of other players to survive, dominate... and escape! ###### Server hosting is provided by Logic Servers. ###### Use the coupon code "baniac" to get 20% off of your purchase! ###### Or this link http://logicservers.com/?promo=baniac ~This Video: https://youtu.be/fp2EeVPsYuA ~This Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8OG4nW3hT33pNz5et-X-TEzRatp3nsKG ~On Steam: http://store.steampowered.com/app/440900/ ~Official Website: http://www.survivetheark.com ~Official Twitter: https://twitter.com/survivetheark CHECK OUT THESE OTHER PLAYLISTS! Modded Conan Exiles: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8OG4nW3hT336_rvc0MxUfWWx4wbPm8Kx The Forest Multiplayer: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8OG4nW3hT32AD79Og-3LmCidaMk4XBgn No Man's Sky Multiplayer: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8OG4nW3hT327Mx1ngeeUSpkOXgo-Z3a6 BE A PART TO THIS! ~Subscribe - http://goo.gl/twm5zO ~I'm on Patreon - https://goo.gl/EAz8Dh ~Join the Discord - https://discord.gg/X8sRwnB ~Slam the like button & comment below! ~Send me mail! j0hnbane on YouTube PO Box 674 West End, NC 27376 CONNECT WITH ME!: ~Twitch: http://twitch.tv/j0hnbane ~Patreon: http://patreon.com/j0hnbane ~Discord: https://discord.gg/X8sRwnB ~Website: http://j0hnbane.com ~Channel: https://youtube.com/j0hnbane ~Twitter: https://twitter.com/j0hnbane ~Facebook: https://facebook.com/j0hnbane ~Google+: https://google.com/+j0hnbane More About the Game: The following features are in the game on its Day-1 Early Access release. We have many more aspects and refinements planned for the long-term development roadmap, and here's what you get to experience right now in ARK: Dinosaurs, Creatures, & Breeding! -- over 70+ currently at Early Access and 100+ planned for final release -- can be tamed using a challenging capture-&-affinity process, involving weakening a feral creature to knock it unconscious, and then nursing it back to health with appropriate food. Once tamed, you can issue commands to your Pet, which it may follow depending on how well you’ve tamed and trained it. Pets, which can continue to level-up and consume food, can also carry Inventory and Equipment such as Armor, carry prey back to your settlement depending on their strength, and larger pets can be ridden and directly controlled! Fly a Pterodactyl over the snow-capped mountains, lift allies over enemy walls, race through the jungle with a pack of Raptors, tromp through an enemy base along a gigantic brontosaurus, or chase down prey on the back of a raging T-Rex! Take part in a dynamic ecosystem life-cycle with its own predator & prey hierarchies, where you are just one creature among many species struggling for dominance and survival. Pets can also be mated with the opposite gender, to selectively breed successive generations using a trait system based on recombinant genetic inheritance. This process includes both egg-based incubation and mammalian gestation lifecycles! Or put more simply, breed & raise Dino Babies! You must eat and drink to survive, with different kinds of plants & meat having different nutritional properties, including human meat. Ensuring a supply of fresh water to your home and inventory is a pressing concern. All physical actions come at a cost of food and water, long-distance travel is fraught with subsistence peril! Inventory weight makes you move slower, and the day/night cycle along with randomized weather patterns add another layer of challenge by altering the temperature of the environment, causing you to hunger or thirst more quickly. Build a fire or shelter, and craft a large variety of customizable clothing & armors, to help protect yourself against locational damage & extreme temperatures using the dynamic indoor/outdoor insulation calculation system! By chopping down forests full of trees and mining metal and other precious resources, you can craft the parts to build massive multi-leveled structures composed of complex snap-linked parts, including ramps, beams, pillars, windows, doors, gates, remote gates, trapdoors, water pipes, faucets, generators, wires and all manner of electrical devices, and ladders among many other types. Structures have a load system to fall apart if enough support has been destroyed, so reinforcing your buildings is important.
Views: 2302 j0hnbane
7.Preventing Mining-related Illness in Workers and the Community, AUA
 
01:54:09
PANEL 3. Preventing Mining-related Illness in Workers and the Community 1. Denny Dobbin President Society for Occupational and Environmental Health 2. Exposure Assessment and Risk Management in Mining Communities: The Bunker Hill Site Example Susan Spalinger Principal Scientist TerraGraphics Environmental Engineering, Inc. 3. Implementing Integrated Health, Response and Remediation in Diverse Economic and Cultural Settings Margrit von Braun Dean and Professor Emerita, University of Idaho Co-founder TIFO & TerraGraphics Environmental Engineering, Inc. 4. Phytostabilization of Mine Tailings: Metal Speciation and Dust Suppression Raina Maier Director, Center for Environmentally Sustainable Mining University of Arizona 5. Toxic Sites Identification Program Andrew McCartor Regional Program Director Blacksmith Institute ---------------------------------------------------------- International Scientific Symposium on Emerging Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health: Mining and Construction in Transition Economies April 22-23, 2013 American University of Armenia Yerevan, Republic of Armenia Organizing Committee Collegium Ramazzini AUA School of Public Health AUA Akopian Center for the Environment We thank the following organizations for sponsorship and in-kind support: Collegium Ramazzini American University of Armenia World Health Organization National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, USA TerraGraphics International Foundation Blacksmith Institute Counterpart International Symposium link: www.eoh2013.aua.am
Views: 180 AUA ACE
Toxic River: EPA’s accident posing a serious health risk
 
02:03
Crews working for the environmental protection agency accidentally sent a million gallons of toxic sludge into a Colorado river this week. The fear is that heavy metals from an abandoned gold mine pose a serious health risk to people downstream in Colorado and New Mexico. Mireya Villarreal reports.
Views: 1356 CBS This Morning
The Impact of Mining on Women
 
19:27
The Marikana massacre most certainly turned the spotlight on the women in mining communities by bringing into sharp focus the challenges facing the widows of the slain mineworkers. Fazila Farouk of SACSIS talks to Samantha Hargreaves of Womin about the broader impact of mining on women in mining communities and learns about land grabs, water grabs and the health impacts of environmental degradation and water pollution, which create an additional burden for the women behind the mineworkers. Women in mining communities, both within sender communities and recipient communities, are often also engaged in unpaid labour that subsidises the profits of big mining companies. The negative impacts of mining well outweigh any social responsibility investments made by mining corporations, contends Hargreaves. For a transcript of this interview please visit the SACSIS website at http://sacsis.co.za/site/article/1818.
Views: 577 SACSIS
Rethinking Water Challenges in China with Hongqiao Liu
 
09:31
China’s economic miracle has come at a heavy environmental price, and policy makers are only beginning to respond in earnest. While China’s leaders tackle the country’s smog problems, non-gaseous pollutants are a mounting environmental and public health threat. Unsafe drinking water is pumped into millions of homes every day, and under-regulated rare earth metals mining has rendered whole villages uninhabitable. Widespread awareness of urban and rural water pollution has fueled a boom in China’s bottled water industry, currently growing twice as fast as the country’s GDP. Bottled water is not however, a sustainable replacement for clean tap water; lack of oversight at treatment facilities does not guarantee its safety for consumption, and massive amounts of plastic waste is generated. Meanwhile, the extraction and processing of rare earth metals, in which China accounts for 85% of global production, is wreaking environmental havoc in surrounding districts. Though critical to many modern technology industries, through chemical waste and the unearthing of radioactive substances, rare earth metals mining has created “cancer villages,” contaminated drinking water and agricultural produce, and is now endangering the Yellow River. Hongqiao Liu is an environmental researcher and award winning journalist who focuses on balancing economic and environmental imperatives. In her recent research, Ms. Liu has examined the alarming effects of water pollution and rare earth metals mining in China, and investigated the obstacles to regulatory reform. Ms. Liu discussed her findings with the National Committee on November 7, 2016, in New York City. Bio: Hongqiao Liu has worked as both an environmental researcher and journalist at some of China’s most influential media outlets: Southern Metropolis Daily and Caixin Media. Her reporting ranges from social and civic issues and environmental crime to emerging environment-related health challenges in China. Her reporting has raised heated public debate within China, and inspired policy change at the national level. Ms. Liu is currently a consultant for China Water Risk (CWR), a think tank focused on addressing business and environmental risk arising from China’s limited water resources. At CWR, she has expanded her previous investigations into reports that explore China’s challenges in safeguarding its drinking water sources. Ms. Liu’s work at CWR includes China’s Long March Towards Safe Drinking Water, Bottled Water in China: Boom or Bust?, and Rare Earths: Shades of Grey – Can China Continue to Fuel our Clean and Smart Future? These reports have been widely cited in policy papers released by China’s Ministry of Environmental Protection, Caixin, HSBC, and Moody’s Research. Issues raised by Ms. Liu were also picked up by global and local media such as The Guardian, The Economist, China Daily, Xinhua, and Phoenix Weekly, among others. Ms. Liu is a regular contributing author to the Green Book of Environment: The Annual Report on Environment Development of China. She also works closely with China Dialogue’s “Third Pole” and Internews’ Earth Journalism Network to expand the role of environmental journalism in Chinese media. Ahead of COP21, Liu was a judge in UNDP’s annual “Climate Change Storytelling Contest” and in Paris, she sat on a panel to discuss green growth along with The Economist’s senior editor at “Earth to Paris” hosted by the United Nations Foundation. Outside China, Ms. Liu has explored new approaches to covering transnational wildlife crime. She worked closely with the China-Africa Reporting Project of Witwatersrand University and the Forum for African Investigative Reporters to develop a GIS-based database on rhinoceros poaching and trafficking. Speaking at the African Investigative Journalists Annual Conference in 2014, Ms. Liu introduced China’s perspectives on wildlife crime to help facilitate a global approach toward preventing the trade. Her collaboration with the Oxpeckers Center of Environmental Investigative Journalism, an African journalism initiative, continues today. Ms. Liu attended from Beijing Normal University on a national journalism scholarship, and graduated with a bachelor in communications. She holds the record as the youngest recipient of many journalism awards and fellowships on environmental and science journalism from Chinese and international media associations.