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Mount St. Helens: May 18, 1980
 
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For more information visit: http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/234 USGS scientists recount their experiences before, during and after the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Loss of their colleague David A. Johnston and 56 others in the eruption cast a pall over one of the most dramatic geologic moments in American history.
Views: 361982 USGS
Time-lapse images of Mount St. Helens dome growth 2004-2008
 
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http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/628 The rapid onset of unrest at Mount St. Helens on September 23, 2004 initiated an uninterrupted lava-dome-building eruption that continued until 2008. The initial phase produced rapid growth of a lava dome as magma pushed upward. As shown in the video, an initial succession of lava spines, two recumbent and one steeply sloping, grew to nearly 500 m in length before disintegrating into mounds of rubble. The trajectory of lava extrusion was affected by the geometry of the crater, particularly the proximity of the vent to the south crater wall, and by the growing volume of erupted material.
Views: 669057 USGS
Cryptodomes by Blind Labyrinth
 
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Quasi-impressionist response to a natural phenomenon. We suggest closing your eyes and just letting it take you where it goes.
Views: 48 Blind Labyrinth
Time series of dome and glacier growth at Mount St  Helens  Washington  2004 201
 
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The video shows time-lapse changes in the lava dome and Crater Glacier from 2004-2012. The images were created from 1:12,000 scale vertical aerial photographs combined with ground control points from campaign GPS and targets. Photogrammetry software was used to collect a 3-D point cloud and combined to make a digital elevation model (DEM). Information regarding volume and rates of growth of the lava dome and glacier are extracted from DEMs to monitor surface changes in the crater. valcano,earthquakes annd volcano,Earthquakes,Volcano (Geographical Feature Category),seismometers,Mount St. Helens (Mountain),Mount St Helens,volcano,volcanoes,volcanoes for kids,eyjafjallajokull volcano,Volcano (Geographical Feature Category),what are volcanoes,volcano news,volcanoe,volcanos,famous volcanoes,volcano research,all about volcanoes,natural disasters volcanoes,natural disaster volcano,volcano footage,videos about volcanoes,what are volcanoes
Views: 294 Volcanos
Lava Dome breaks on Mount Sinabung
 
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Lava Dome breaks on Mount Sinabung Video from our Expedition to Mount Sinabung in 2016.
Views: 4081 VolcanoDiscovery
Mount. St. Helen's
 
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A short video helpful for GCSE revision or if you're just interested in the facts about the Mount St. Helen's eruption in 1980. Featuring causes, effects and responses and many photos
Views: 1933 Rachel Ejoy
America's Dangerous Volcanoes
 
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It has been thirty years since Mount Saint Helens reawakened, but what other volcanoes pose the threat of lava flows, toxic gases, volcanic ash, and mudflows? Bill Burton of the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program discusses the efforts being made by the federal government to monitor volcanoes in the Pacific Northwest, Hawaii, and Yellowstone for eruptive activity.
Major eruption at Santa Maria volcano
 
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A major eruption at Santiaguito lava dome in Guatemala.... WEBSITE: thewatchers.adorraeli.com Posting credit: by Adonai Article Link: http://thewatchers.adorraeli.com/2013/08/23/major-eruption-at-santa-maria-volcano-guatemala/ Featured image: Observatorio Vulcanologico Santiaguito, INSIVUMEH, August 22, 2013 Photo credit: Bill Rose, 1980 (Michigan Technological University DISCLAIMER: I read for the visually impaired and for mobile device users. If anyone does not wish to listen to the entire broadcast, please use link provided... The content does not necessarily reflect my own personal viewpoints or opinions, it is up to the viewer to decide. I'm unable to verify or confirm the content, so please understand this. FAIR USE STATEMENT: This site may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in an effort to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. we believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/... If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.
Views: 3956 Pinksapphiret2
dome-shaped volcano & shield volcano
 
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with ice cream
Views: 162 Hyeon A shin
There's an Absolutely Massive Lava Dome Lurking Underneath Japan
 
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An ancient underwater volcano responsible for one of the largest known super-eruptions in history looks to be busy making silent, fiery preparations for its inevitable return....
Views: 264 The Science Channel
Fissure Vents - Shield Volcanoes - Lava Domes - Cryptodomes - Volcanic Cones 2015
 
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SUBSCRIBE, LIKE, SHARE AND COMMENT #turtledove #charliemarie #ohmygoodness #papi #itsgonnaexplode #volcano #icant #seriously I can’t wait to do science projects with her. Lol. So much fun. #science by four_seven_photography /
Views: 131 Lesia Burnside
Mount Saint Helens - Act One
 
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Act one in a series on the 1980 eruption of Mount Saint Helens. Time to learn my dudes
Views: 27 Arabella Hely
Shinomedake lava dome and crater from a UAV
 
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I took this video using a DJI Phantom UAV ("Flying camera") at the crater of Shinmoedake volcano, Kyushu, Japan.Visible are the crater rim, the lava dome emplaced during the 2011 eruption of Shinmoedake, and many locations of active degassing. Note: speed of video here is 8 times the real speed.
Views: 249 Einat Lev
Earthquakes Exploding, Volcanoes Next ? September 29-14
 
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Be on the Ready .... http://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2014/09/29/science-explains-why-volcanoes-are-erupting-all-over-the-place-right-now/
1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens
 
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In 1980, a major volcanic eruption occurred at Mount St. Helens, a volcano located in state of Washington, in the United States. The eruption (which was a level 5 event) was the only significant one to occur in the contiguous 48 U.S. states since the 1915 eruption of Lassen Peak in California. The eruption was preceded by a two-month series of earthquakes and steam-venting episodes, caused by an injection of magma at shallow depth below the volcano that created a huge bulge and a fracture system on the mountain's north slope. Prior to the eruption, USGS scientists convinced local authorities to close Mount St. Helens to the general public and to maintain the closure in spite of local pressure to re-open it; their work saved thousands of lives. An earthquake at 8:32:17 a.m. PDT (UTC−7) on Sunday, May 18, 1980, caused the entire weakened north face to slide away, suddenly exposing the partly molten, gas- and steam-rich rock in the volcano to lower pressure. The rock responded by exploding a hot mix of lava and pulverized older rock toward Spirit Lake so fast that it overtook the avalanching north face. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 237 Audiopedia
1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens
 
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In 1980, a major volcanic eruption occurred at Mount St. Helens, a volcano located in state of Washington, in the United States. The eruption was the only significant one to occur in the contiguous 48 U.S. states since the 1915 eruption of Lassen Peak in California. The eruption was preceded by a two-month series of earthquakes and steam-venting episodes, caused by an injection of magma at shallow depth below the volcano that created a huge bulge and a fracture system on the mountain's north slope. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 152 encyclopediacc
Intrusive Landforms
 
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A video by Gretchen Gebhardt for science students at Columbia Gorge Community College
Godabunga Katla 1999-2017 Earthquakes M0.5+  1080HD TEST
 
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All earthquakes of magnitude 0.5 and above, in the Godabunga cryptodome and Katla volcano. Outlined are some seismic features at Katla, mainly for test purposes to test the drawing functions. Data by Iceland Met Office. Andrej Flis
Views: 278 Andrej Flis
Mayon Volcano Panorama from the Lava dome - Schadow1 Expeditions
 
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Mayon Volcano view and the dried up lava from the 2006, 2009 eruption from the Helipad at the foot of the volcano
Views: 342 Ervin Malicdem
Volcano | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcano 00:02:36 1 Etymology 00:03:07 2 Plate tectonics 00:03:17 2.1 Divergent plate boundaries 00:04:27 2.2 Convergent plate boundaries 00:05:33 2.3 Hotspots 00:06:26 3 Volcanic features 00:07:58 3.1 Fissure vents 00:08:15 3.2 Shield volcanoes 00:09:00 3.3 Lava domes 00:09:40 3.4 Cryptodomes 00:10:10 3.5 Volcanic cones (cinder cones) 00:11:24 3.6 Stratovolcanoes (composite volcanoes) 00:13:25 3.7 Supervolcanoes 00:14:42 3.8 Underwater volcanoes 00:16:15 3.9 Subglacial volcanoes 00:17:39 3.10 Mud volcanoes 00:18:09 4 Erupted material 00:18:19 4.1 Lava composition 00:22:05 4.2 Lava texture 00:23:09 5 Volcanic activity 00:23:20 5.1 Popular classification of volcanoes 00:24:12 5.1.1 Active 00:28:43 5.1.2 Extinct 00:30:08 5.1.3 Dormant and reactivated 00:31:49 5.2 Technical classification of volcanoes 00:32:01 5.2.1 Volcanic-alert level 00:32:51 5.2.2 Volcano warning schemes of the United States 00:33:33 6 Decade volcanoes 00:34:57 7 Effects of volcanoes 00:35:47 7.1 Volcanic gases 00:38:14 7.2 Significant consequences 00:38:25 7.2.1 Prehistory 00:39:44 7.2.2 Historical 00:40:29 7.3 Acid rain 00:42:52 7.4 Hazards 00:43:56 8 Volcanoes on other celestial bodies 00:48:19 9 Traditional beliefs about volcanoes Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7935097142912155 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A volcano is a rupture in the crust of a planetary-mass object, such as Earth, that allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because its crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in its mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging, and most are found underwater. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates whereas the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines.
Views: 24 wikipedia tts
Volcano | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Volcano 00:01:59 1 Etymology 00:02:24 2 Plate tectonics 00:02:34 2.1 Divergent plate boundaries 00:03:28 2.2 Convergent plate boundaries 00:04:19 2.3 Hotspots 00:05:00 3 Volcanic features 00:06:13 3.1 Fissure vents 00:06:27 3.2 Shield volcanoes 00:07:03 3.3 Lava domes 00:07:34 3.4 Cryptodomes 00:07:58 3.5 Volcanic cones (cinder cones) 00:08:55 3.6 Stratovolcanoes (composite volcanoes) 00:10:28 3.7 Supervolcanoes 00:11:28 3.8 Underwater volcanoes 00:12:39 3.9 Subglacial volcanoes 00:13:44 3.10 Mud volcanoes 00:14:08 4 Erupted material 00:14:18 4.1 Lava composition 00:17:10 4.2 Lava texture 00:18:01 5 Volcanic activity 00:18:10 5.1 Popular classification of volcanoes 00:18:52 5.1.1 Active 00:22:16 5.1.2 Extinct 00:23:20 5.1.3 Dormant and reactivated 00:24:37 5.2 Technical classification of volcanoes 00:24:47 5.2.1 Volcanic-alert level 00:25:27 5.2.2 Volcano warning schemes of the United States 00:26:00 6 Decade volcanoes 00:27:07 7 Effects of volcanoes 00:27:46 7.1 Volcanic gases 00:29:40 7.2 Significant consequences 00:29:49 7.2.1 Prehistory 00:30:52 7.2.2 Historical 00:31:28 7.3 Acid rain 00:33:17 7.4 Hazards 00:34:08 8 Volcanoes on other celestial bodies 00:37:29 9 Traditional beliefs about volcanoes Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A volcano is a rupture in the crust of a planetary-mass object, such as Earth, that allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because its crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in its mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging, and most are found underwater. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates whereas the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines.
Views: 12 wikipedia tts
TOP 10 MOST DANGEROUS ACTIVE VOLCANOES AROUND WORLD
 
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Top 10 Most Dangerous Active Volcanoes Around World Subscribe to my channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn9HCL75BmxsK4prGx-Pjxg For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] Description: The Yellowstone Caldera is the volcanic caldera and supervolcano located in Yellowstone National Park in the United States, sometimes referred to as the Yellowstone Supervolcano. Mount Vesuvius is a somma-stratovolcano located on the Gulf of Naples in Campania, Italy, about 9 km (5.6 mi) east of Naples and a short distance from the shore. Sakurajima is an active composite volcano (stratovolcano) and a former island in Kagoshima Prefecture in Kyushu, Japan. Galeras Volcano is an Andean stratovolcano in the Colombian department of Nariño, near the departmental capital Pasto. Its summit rises 4,276 metres (14,029 ft) above sea level. It has erupted frequently since the Spanish conquest, with its first historical eruption being recorded on December 7, 1580. A 1993 eruption killed nine people, including six scientists who had descended into the volcano's crater to sample gases and take gravity measurements in an attempt to be able to predict future eruptions. It is currently the most active volcano in Colombia. Mount Merapi, Gunung Merapi, is an active stratovolcano located on the border between Central Java and Yogyakarta, Indonesia. It is the most active volcano in Indonesia and has erupted regularly since 1548. It is located approximately 28 kilometres (17 mi) north of Yogyakarta city which has a population of 2.4 million, and thousands of people live on the flanks of the volcano, with villages as high as 1,700 metres (5,600 ft) above sea level. Mount Nyiragongo is an active stratovolcano with an elevation of 3,470 metres in the Virunga Mountains associated with the Albertine Rift. It is located inside Virunga National Park, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, about 20 km north of the town of Goma and Lake Kivu and just west of the border with Rwanda. The main crater is about two kilometres wide and usually contains a lava lake. The crater presently has two distinct cooled lava benches within the crater walls - one at about 3,175 m and a lower one at about 2,975 m. Nyiragongo's lava lake has at times been the most voluminous known lava lake in recent history. The depth of the lava lake varies considerably. A maximum elevation of the lava lake was recorded at about 3,250 m prior to the January 1977 eruption - a lake depth of about 600 m. Ulawun is a basaltic and andesitic stratovolcano situated on the island of New Britain, Papua New Guinea, about 130 km south-west of Rabaul. It is the highest mountain in the Bismarck Archipelago at 2,334 metres (7,657 ft), and one of the most active volcanoes in Papua New Guinea. The first recorded eruption of Ulawun was by William Dampier in 1700; there have been 22 recorded eruptions since the 18th century. Several thousand people live near the volcano. Taal Volcano is a complex volcano located on the island of Luzon in the Philippines. It is the second most active volcano in the Philippines with 33 historical eruptions. All of these eruptions are concentrated on Volcano Island, an island near the middle of Taal Lake. The lake partially fills Taal Caldera, which was formed by prehistoric eruptions between 140,000 and 5,380 BP. Viewed from Tagaytay Ridge, Taal Volcano and Lake presents one of the most picturesque and attractive views in the Philippines. It is located about 50 kilometres (31 miles) south of the capital of the country, the city of Manila. Mauna Loa is one of five volcanoes that form the Island of Hawaii in the U.S. state of Hawaiʻi in the Pacific Ocean. The largest subaerial volcano in both mass and volume, Mauna Loa has historically been considered the largest volcano on Earth. It is an active shield volcano with relatively gentle slopes, with a volume estimated at approximately 18,000 cubic miles (75,000 km3), although its peak is about 120 feet (37 m) lower than that of its neighbor, Mauna Kea. Lava eruptions from Mauna Loa are silica-poor and very fluid, and they tend to be non-explosive. Featuring: 10. Mauna Loa, Hawaii, USA 9. Taal Volcano, Philippines 8. Ulawun, Papua New Guinea 7. Mt. Nyiragongo, Democratic Republic of Congo 6. Mt. Merapi, Indonesia 5. Galeras, Colombia 4. Sakurajima, Japan 3. Popocatépetl, Mexico 2. Mt. Vesuvius, Italy 1. Yellowstone Caldera, USA
Views: 722 CarpeIndicium
Volcano | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcano 00:01:59 1 Etymology 00:02:24 2 Plate tectonics 00:02:34 2.1 Divergent plate boundaries 00:03:28 2.2 Convergent plate boundaries 00:04:19 2.3 Hotspots 00:05:00 3 Volcanic features 00:06:13 3.1 Fissure vents 00:06:27 3.2 Shield volcanoes 00:07:03 3.3 Lava domes 00:07:34 3.4 Cryptodomes 00:07:58 3.5 Volcanic cones (cinder cones) 00:08:55 3.6 Stratovolcanoes (composite volcanoes) 00:10:28 3.7 Supervolcanoes 00:11:28 3.8 Underwater volcanoes 00:12:39 3.9 Subglacial volcanoes 00:13:44 3.10 Mud volcanoes 00:14:08 4 Erupted material 00:14:18 4.1 Lava composition 00:17:10 4.2 Lava texture 00:18:01 5 Volcanic activity 00:18:10 5.1 Popular classification of volcanoes 00:18:52 5.1.1 Active 00:22:16 5.1.2 Extinct 00:23:20 5.1.3 Dormant and reactivated 00:24:37 5.2 Technical classification of volcanoes 00:24:47 5.2.1 Volcanic-alert level 00:25:27 5.2.2 Volcano warning schemes of the United States 00:26:00 6 Decade volcanoes 00:27:07 7 Effects of volcanoes 00:27:46 7.1 Volcanic gases 00:29:40 7.2 Significant consequences 00:29:49 7.2.1 Prehistory 00:30:52 7.2.2 Historical 00:31:28 7.3 Acid rain 00:33:17 7.4 Hazards 00:34:08 8 Volcanoes on other celestial bodies 00:37:29 9 Traditional beliefs about volcanoes Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A volcano is a rupture in the crust of a planetary-mass object, such as Earth, that allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because its crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in its mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging, and most are found underwater. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates whereas the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines.
Views: 23 wikipedia tts
Volcano | Wikipedia audio article
 
37:05
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Volcano Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A volcano is a rupture in the crust of a planetary-mass object, such as Earth, that allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because its crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in its mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging, and most are found underwater. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates whereas the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines.
Views: 21 wikipedia tts
Volcano | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Volcano Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A volcano is a rupture in the crust of a planetary-mass object, such as Earth, that allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because its crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in its mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging, and most are found underwater. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates whereas the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines.
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