Home
Search results “Recipient non repudiation cryptography”
What is NONREPUDIATION? What does NONREPUDIATION mean? NONREPUDIATION meaning & explanation
 
04:58
What is NONREPUDIATION? What does NONREPUDIATION mean? NONREPUDIATION meaning - NONREPUDIATION pronunciation - NONREPUDIATION definition - NONREPUDIATION explanation - How to pronounce NONREPUDIATION? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Non-repudiation refers to a state of affairs where the author of a statement will not be able to successfully challenge the authorship of the statement or validity of an associated contract. The term is often seen in a legal setting wherein the authenticity of a signature is being challenged. In such an instance, the authenticity is being "repudiated". In a general sense non-repudiation involves associating actions or changes to a unique individual. For a secure area, for example, it may be desirable to implement a key card access system. Non-repudiation would be violated if it were not also a strictly enforced policy to prohibit sharing of the key cards and to immediately report lost or stolen cards. Otherwise determining who performed the action of opening the door cannot be trivially determined. Similarly, for computer accounts, the individual owner of the account must not allow others to use that account, especially, for instance, by giving away their account's password, and a policy should be implemented to enforce this. This prevents the owner of the account from denying actions performed by the account. Regarding digital security, the cryptological meaning and application of non-repudiation shifts to mean: A service that provides proof of the integrity and origin of data. An authentication that can be asserted to be genuine with high assurance. Proof of data integrity is typically the easiest of these requirements to accomplish. A data hash, such as SHA2, is usually sufficient to establish that the likelihood of data being undetectably changed is extremely low. Even with this safeguard, it is still possible to tamper with data in transit, either through a man-in-the-middle attack or phishing. Due to this flaw, data integrity is best asserted when the recipient already possesses the necessary verification information. The most common method of asserting the digital origin of data is through digital certificates, a form of public key infrastructure to which digital signatures belong. Note that the public key scheme is not used for encryption in this form; i.e. the goal is not to achieve confidentiality, since a message signed with a private key can be read by anyone using the public key. Verifying the digital origin means that the certified/signed data can be, with reasonable certainty, trusted to be from somebody who possesses the private key corresponding to the signing certificate. If the key is not properly safeguarded by the original owner, digital forgery can become a major concern. The ways in which a party may attempt to repudiate a signature present a challenge to the trustworthiness of the signatures themselves. The standard approach to mitigating these risks is to involve a trusted third party. The two most common TTPs are forensic analysts and notaries. A forensic analyst specializing in handwriting can look at a signature, compare it to a known valid signature, and make a reasonable assessment of the legitimacy of the first signature. A notary provides a witness whose job is to verify the identity of an individual by checking other credentials and affixing their certification that the party signing is who they claim to be. Further, a notary provides the extra benefit of maintaining independent logs of their transactions, complete with the type of credential checked and another signature that can independently be verified by the preceding forensic analyst. For this double security, notaries are the preferred form of verification. On the digital side, the only TTP is the repository for public key certificates. This provides the recipient with the ability to verify the origin of an item even if no direct exchange of the public information has ever been made. The digital signature, however, is forensically identical in both legitimate and forged uses - if someone possesses the private key they can create a "real" signature. The protection of the private key is the idea behind the United States Department of Defense's Common Access Card (CAC), which never allows the key to leave the card and therefore necessitates the possession of the card in addition to the personal identification number (PIN) code necessary to unlock the card for permission to use it for encryption and digital signatures.
Views: 4926 The Audiopedia
Nonrepudiation Meaning
 
00:13
Video shows what nonrepudiation means. Assurance that a contract cannot later be denied by either of the parties involved.. Assurance that the claimed sender or recipient is in fact the party who sent or received a given message.. Nonrepudiation Meaning. How to pronounce, definition audio dictionary. How to say nonrepudiation. Powered by MaryTTS, Wiktionary
Views: 967 ADictionary
What Is Non Repudiation?
 
00:47
However, that is not correct the non repudiation service can be viewed as an extension to identification and authentication. Non repudiation wikipedia. Non repudiation is a legal concept that 20 oct 2016 this article sheds light on the two approaches to achieve non of an electronic message emission and assurance someone cannot deny validity something (nr) one security services (or dimensions as defined in document x. 805 by the itu) for point to point communications. What is non repudiation? Definition and meaning why banks need repudiation of origin really repudiable with digital signatures? . What is nonrepudiation? Definition from techopedia. What is the difference between authenticity and non repudiation? What repudiation? Principles, techniques best practices. Secure 19 dec 2016 a definition of non repudiation with several common examples service provides assurance the origin or delivery data in order to protect sender against false denial by recipient that has public key technology is traditionally defined as inability person (to whom been bound recognized certification definition, act repudiatingNon wikipedia. What is non repudiation in network security? Non slovnk potaov informatiky a st. Non repudiation is a much desired property in the digital world. What is nonrepudiation? Webopedia definition. Non repudiation wikipedia non refers to a state of affairs where the author statement will not be able successfully challenge authorship or validity in general, nonrepudiation is ability ensure that party contract communication cannot deny authenticity their signature on document means transferred message has been sent and received by parties claiming have along with digital signatures, public keys can problem when it comes if recipient exposed, either knowingly 31 aug 2011 some people taught provided through crypto mathematics alone. In this lesson, you'll learn more non repudiation nepopiratelnost. This article describes that property and shows how it can be definition of non repudiation general intent to accept one's obligation under a contract bound for its performance 29 aug 2016 understanding achieve emission origin in banking transactions 14 jun 2017 what does mean? Repudiation means reject or deny the validity something. Non repudiation and digital signature infosec resources. Vlastnost, kter umon pozdj dkaz o manipulaci s daty vetn jejich doruen, pvodu, pedn apod 9 jan 2014 introduction. Rant about non repudiation the world stddefine at dictionary. Understanding non repudiation of origin and what is repudiation? Cryptomathicnetwork, information computer security lab 5 examples simplicable. In general, non repudiation applies when data is 27 feb 2017 a typ
Views: 481 Hadassah Hartman
What is DIGITAL SIGNATURE? What does DIGITAL SIGNATURE mean? DIGITAL SIGNATURE explanation
 
02:48
What is DIGITAL SIGNATURE? What does DIGITAL SIGNATURE mean? DIGITAL SIGNATURE explanation. A digital signature is a mathematical scheme for demonstrating the authenticity of a digital message or documents. A valid digital signature gives a recipient reason to believe that the message was created by a known sender, that the sender cannot deny having sent the message (authentication and non-repudiation), and that the message was not altered in transit (integrity). Digital signatures are a standard element of most cryptographic protocol suites, and are commonly used for software distribution, financial transactions, contract management software, and in other cases where it is important to detect forgery or tampering. Digital signatures are often used to implement electronic signatures, a broader term that refers to any electronic data that carries the intent of a signature, but not all electronic signatures use digital signatures. In some countries, including the United States, India, Brazil, Saudi Arabia, Switzerland and the countries of the European Union, electronic signatures have legal significance. Digital signatures employ asymmetric cryptography. In many instances they provide a layer of validation and security to messages sent through a nonsecure channel: Properly implemented, a digital signature gives the receiver reason to believe the message was sent by the claimed sender. Digital seals and signatures are equivalent to handwritten signatures and stamped seals. Digital signatures are equivalent to traditional handwritten signatures in many respects, but properly implemented digital signatures are more difficult to forge than the handwritten type. Digital signature schemes, in the sense used here, are cryptographically based, and must be implemented properly to be effective. Digital signatures can also provide non-repudiation, meaning that the signer cannot successfully claim they did not sign a message, while also claiming their private key remains secret; further, some non-repudiation schemes offer a time stamp for the digital signature, so that even if the private key is exposed, the signature is valid. Digitally signed messages may be anything representable as a bitstring: examples include electronic mail, contracts, or a message sent via some other cryptographic protocol.
Views: 1843 The Audiopedia
what is cryptography and network security
 
02:31
It is a mono-alphabetic cipher wherein each letter of the plaintext is substituted by another letter to form the ciphertext. It is a simplest form of substitution cipher scheme Modern cryptography uses sophisticated mathematical equations (algorithms) and secret keys to encrypt and decrypt data. Today, cryptography is used to provide secrecy and integrity to our data, and both authentication and anonymity to our communications. Network security attacks and services https://youtu.be/-ZHWhaLInik What is network security explained in minutes https://youtu.be/vqavFou2oxk Predefined functions in PHP https://youtu.be/ewmWqm2H-AA Cryptography or cryptology (from Greek κρυπτός kryptós, "hidden, secret"; and γράφειν graphein, "to write", or -λογία -logia, "study", respectively[1]) is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties called adversaries.[2] More generally, cryptography is about constructing and analyzing protocols that prevent third parties or the public from reading private messages;[3] various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation[4] are central to modern cryptography. Modern cryptography exists at the intersection of the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, electrical engineering, communication science, and physics. Applications of cryptography include electronic commerce, chip-based payment cards, digital currencies, computer passwords, and military communications. Cryptography prior to the modern age was effectively synonymous with encryption, the conversion of information from a readable state to apparent nonsense. The originator of an encrypted message shared the decoding technique needed to recover the original information only with intended recipients, thereby precluding unwanted persons from doing the same. The cryptography literature often uses the name Alice ("A") for the sender, Bob ("B") for the intended recipient, and Eve ("eavesdropper") for the adversary.[5] Since the development of rotor cipher machines in World War I and the advent of computers in World War II, the methods used to carry out cryptology have become increasingly complex and its application more widespread. Modern cryptography is heavily based on mathematical theory and computer science practice; cryptographic algorithms are designed around computational hardness assumptions, making such algorithms hard to break in practice by any adversary. It is theoretically possible to break such a system, but it is infeasible to do so by any known practical means. These schemes are therefore termed computationally secure; theoretical advances, e.g., improvements in integer factorization algorithms, and faster computing technology require these solutions to be continually adapted. There exist information-theoretically secure schemes that probably cannot be broken even with unlimited computing power—an example is the one-time pad—but these schemes are more difficult to implement than the best theoretically breakable but computationally secure mechanisms. The growth of cryptographic technology has raised a number of legal issues in the information age. Cryptography's potential for use as a tool for espionage and sedition has led many governments to classify it as a weapon and to limit or even prohibit its use and export.[6] In some jurisdictions where the use of cryptography is legal, laws permit investigators to compel the disclosure of encryption keys for documents relevant to an investigation.[7][8] Cryptography also plays a major role in digital rights management and copyright infringement of digital media.[9] -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "How to buy a domain name from GoDaddy 2019" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULV2vE1Ptio How to make a calling app in android https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VHRLWDmaHo How to create drawing android app in mit app inventor 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FimKlZH6Lkg How to make android calculator app using mit app https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W39tJVxbvSM How to upload android app in google play store https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIPf9pBi89k how to create camera app in mit app inventor 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-bYys8v9g4 How to create first android app in mit app inventor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pZWdFEzCZP0 -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 431 The Coding Bus
CCNA-Security-210-260-Describe Confidentiality, Integrity, Availability
 
40:51
Security Concepts 1.1 Common security principles 1.1.a Describe confidentiality, integrity, availability (CIA) These are the three basic components of information security. Three primary goals of Network Security are Confidentiality, Integrity and Availability: Confidentiality: The first goal of Network Security is "Confidentiality". The function of "Confidentiality" is in protecting precious business data (in Storage or in Motion) from unauthorized persons. Confidentiality part of Network Security makes sure that the data is available only to intended and authorized persons. Access to business data should be only for those individuals who are permitted to use that data. Integrity: The second goal of Network Security is "Integrity". Integrity aims at maintaining and assuring the accuracy and consistency of data. The function of Integrity is to make sure that the date is accurate and reliable and is not changed by unauthorized persons or hackers. The data received by the recipient must be exactly same as the data sent from the sender, without change in even single bit of data. Availability: The third goal of network security is "Availability". The function of "Availability" in Network Security is to make sure that the Data, Network Resources or Network Services are continuously available to the legitimate users, whenever they require it
Views: 1735 Ahmad Ali
How to achieve integrity and authenticity with Message Authentication Code MAC ?
 
03:17
The protocol for generating and verifying a message authentication code MAC is based on a secret key k shared by the sender and the recipient and is performed using a cryptographic algorithm A. The sender sends not only the bare message m, but follows the message with its corresponding message authentication code MAC. The MAC is computed from the common algorithm A with the secret key k, as follows: MAC=A_k(m) The system does not prevent Mr. X from altering the original message m and its MAC to the new message m' and its corresponding message authentication code MAC'. Now it is the recipient's turn to act. He very much wants to know whether the message received is the one that was sent. In order to check this, he simulates the sender's procedure. He applies the algorithm A with key k to the received message m' and verifies whether the result coincides with the received message authentication code MAC'. If A_k(m') is not equal to MAC', then the recipient knows for certain that something has happened ! and he consequently does not trust the message and reject it. If, however, A_k(m') is equal to MAC' then he reasonably certain that the message was not changed. Of course, this certainty relies heavily on the strength of the cryptographic algorithm A and the number of possible keys. Let us keep in mind the underlying philosophy: Mr. X's deception is foiled since he must find the corresponding message authentication code MAC for his message m', which he cannot do because he does not know the secret key k. The mechanism of the MAC is a tool for achieving message integrity and message authenticity. If the verification works, then the recipient also know that the message is authentic because the sender is the only other person who knows the secret key k. (selected from Cryptology by Albrecht Beutelspacher) This video was downloaded and edited from Message Authentication & Confidentiality @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CpBupc7qIkQ
Views: 328 satnamo
Digital signature
 
26:54
A digital signature is a mathematical scheme for demonstrating the authenticity of a digital message or document. A valid digital signature gives a recipient reason to believe that the message was created by a known sender, such that the sender cannot deny having sent the message (authentication and non-repudiation) and that the message was not altered in transit (integrity). Digital signatures are commonly used for software distribution, financial transactions, and in other cases where it is important to detect forgery or tampering. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 235 Audiopedia
Digital signature
 
21:40
If you find our videos helpful you can support us by buying something from amazon. https://www.amazon.com/?tag=wiki-audio-20 Digital signature A digital signature is a mathematical scheme for demonstrating the authenticity of a digital message or documents.A valid digital signature gives a recipient reason to believe that the message was created by a known sender, that the sender cannot deny having sent the message (authentication and non-repudiation), and that the message was not altered in transit (integrity). -Video is targeted to blind users Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA image source in video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V04mSwoYC6Y
Views: 7 WikiAudio
Digital Envelopes
 
01:31
This video is part of the Udacity course "Intro to Information Security". Watch the full course at https://www.udacity.com/course/ud459
Views: 3785 Udacity
Principles of Network Security and Cryptography
 
08:54
In this video tutorial we study the basic principles of Network security and also see the concept of Cryptography by understanding a basic example. Principles of Network Security to be discussed in this video are as follows: Confidentiality Authentication Integrity Non-repudiation Access Control Availability We will also learn the concept of Cryptography in this tutorial. Here's the definition of Cryptography: Cryptography is the art of achieving security by encoding messages to make them non-readable This video is a continuation of the previous video so make sure you check that video as well so that you get to know some basics of Network security. Download the FREE Network Security App on Google Playstore for Android - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.intelisenze.networksecuritytutorials Simple Snippets on Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/simplesnippets/ Simple Snippets on Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/simplesnipp... Simple Snippets Google Plus Page- https://plus.google.com/+SimpleSnippets Simple Snippets email ID- [email protected] Download my FREE Network Security Android App - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.intelisenze.networksecuritytutorials For Classroom Coaching in Mumbai for Programming & other IT/CS Subjects Checkout UpSkill Infotech - https://upskill.tech/ UpSkill is an Ed-Tech Company / Coaching Centre for Information Technology / Computer Science oriented courses and offer coacing for various Degree courses like BSc.IT, BSc.CS, BCA, MSc.IT, MSc.CS, MCA etc. Contact via email /call / FB /Whatsapp for more info email - [email protected] We also Provide Certification courses like - Android Development Web Development Java Developer Course .NET Developer Course Check us out on Social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram, Google etc Facebook page - https://www.facebook.com/upskillinfotech/ Insta page - https://www.instagram.com/upskill_infotech/ Google Maps - https://goo.gl/maps/vjNtZazLzW82
Views: 25192 Simple Snippets
How to achieve integrity and authenticity with Message Authentication Code MAC ?
 
01:45
The protocol for generating and verifying a message authentication code MAC is based on a secret key k shared by the sender and the recipient, and is performed using a cryptographic algorithm A. The sender sends not only the bare message m, but folllows m with its corresponding MAC. The MAC is computed from the common algorithm A with the secret key k, as follows: MAC=A_k(m) The system does not prevent Mr. X from altering the original message m and its MAC to m' and MAC'. Now it is the recipient's turn to act. He very much wants to know whether the message received is the one that was sent. In order to check this, he simulates the sender's procedure. He applies the algorithm A with key k to the received message m' and verifies whether the result A_k(m') coincides with the received message authentication code MAC'. If A_k(m') is not equal to MAC', then the recipient knows for certain that something has happened ! and he consequently does not trust the message and reject it. If, however, A_k(m') is equal to MAC' then he reasonably certain that the message was not changed. Of course, this certainty relies heavily on the strength of the cryptographic algorithm A and the number of possible keys. Let us keep in mind the underlying philosophy: Mr. X's deception is foiled since he must find the corresponding message authentication code MAC for his message m', which he cannot do because he does not know the secret key k. The mechanism of the MAC is a tool for achieving message integrity and message authenticity. If the verification works, then the recipient also know that the message is authentic because the sender is the only other person who knows the secret key k. (from Cryptology by Albrecht Beutelspacher) This video was downloaded and edited from Message Authentication & Confidentiality @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CpBupc7qIkQ
Views: 78 satnamo
NETWORK SECURITY - DIFFIE HELLMAN KEY EXCHANGE ALGORITHM
 
34:11
This Algorithm is used to exchange the secret /symmetric key between sender and receiver. This exchange of key can be done with the help of public key and private key step 1 Assume prime number p step 2 Select a such that a is primitive root of p and a less than p step 3 Assume XA private key of user A step 4 Calculate YA public key of user A with the help of formula step 5 Assume XB private key of user B step 6 Calculate YB public key of user B with the help of formula step 7 Generate K secret Key using YB and XA with the help of formula at Sender side. step 8 Generate K secret Key using YA and XB with the help of formula at Receiver side.
Key escrow
 
03:03
Key escrow is an arrangement in which the keys needed to decrypt encrypted data are held in escrow so that, under certain circumstances, an authorized third party may gain access to those keys. These third parties may include businesses, who may want access to employees' private communications, or governments, who may wish to be able to view the contents of encrypted communications. The technical problem is a largely structural one since access to protected information must be provided only to the intended recipient and at least one third party. The third party should be permitted access only under carefully controlled conditions, as for instance, a court order. Thus far, no system design has been shown to meet this requirement fully on a technical basis alone. All proposed systems also require correct functioning of some social linkage, as for instance the process of request for access, examination of request for 'legitimacy', and granting of access by technical personnel charged with access control. All such linkages / controls have serious problems from a system design security perspective. Systems in which the key may not be changed easily are rendered especially vulnerable as the accidental release of the key will result in many devices becoming totally compromised, necessitating an immediate key change or replacement of the system. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 672 Audiopedia
Symmetric Key and Public Key Encryption
 
06:45
Modern day encryption is performed in two different ways. Check out http://YouTube.com/ITFreeTraining or http://itfreetraining.com for more of our always free training videos. Using the same key or using a pair of keys called the public and private keys. This video looks at how these systems work and how they can be used together to perform encryption. Download the PDF handout http://itfreetraining.com/Handouts/Ce... Encryption Types Encryption is the process of scrambling data so it cannot be read without a decryption key. Encryption prevents data being read by a 3rd party if it is intercepted by a 3rd party. The two encryption methods that are used today are symmetric and public key encryption. Symmetric Key Symmetric key encryption uses the same key to encrypt data as decrypt data. This is generally quite fast when compared with public key encryption. In order to protect the data, the key needs to be secured. If a 3rd party was able to gain access to the key, they could decrypt any data that was encrypt with that data. For this reason, a secure channel is required to transfer the key if you need to transfer data between two points. For example, if you encrypted data on a CD and mail it to another party, the key must also be transferred to the second party so that they can decrypt the data. This is often done using e-mail or the telephone. In a lot of cases, sending the data using one method and the key using another method is enough to protect the data as an attacker would need to get both in order to decrypt the data. Public Key Encryption This method of encryption uses two keys. One key is used to encrypt data and the other key is used to decrypt data. The advantage of this is that the public key can be downloaded by anyone. Anyone with the public key can encrypt data that can only be decrypted using a private key. This means the public key does not need to be secured. The private key does need to be keep in a safe place. The advantage of using such a system is the private key is not required by the other party to perform encryption. Since the private key does not need to be transferred to the second party there is no risk of the private key being intercepted by a 3rd party. Public Key encryption is slower when compared with symmetric key so it is not always suitable for every application. The math used is complex but to put it simply it uses the modulus or remainder operator. For example, if you wanted to solve X mod 5 = 2, the possible solutions would be 2, 7, 12 and so on. The private key provides additional information which allows the problem to be solved easily. The math is more complex and uses much larger numbers than this but basically public and private key encryption rely on the modulus operator to work. Combing The Two There are two reasons you want to combine the two. The first is that often communication will be broken into two steps. Key exchange and data exchange. For key exchange, to protect the key used in data exchange it is often encrypted using public key encryption. Although slower than symmetric key encryption, this method ensures the key cannot accessed by a 3rd party while being transferred. Since the key has been transferred using a secure channel, a symmetric key can be used for data exchange. In some cases, data exchange may be done using public key encryption. If this is the case, often the data exchange will be done using a small key size to reduce the processing time. The second reason that both may be used is when a symmetric key is used and the key needs to be provided to multiple users. For example, if you are using encryption file system (EFS) this allows multiple users to access the same file, which includes recovery users. In order to make this possible, multiple copies of the same key are stored in the file and protected from being read by encrypting it with the public key of each user that requires access. References "Public-key cryptography" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public-k... "Encryption" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encryption
Views: 488731 itfreetraining
Cryptography Use Cases - CompTIA Security+ SY0-501 - 6.1
 
04:21
Security+ Training Course Index: http://professormesser.link/sy0501 Professor Messer’s Course Notes: http://professormesser.link/501cn Frequently Asked Questions: http://professormesser.link/faq - - - - - We use cryptography for many different purposes. In this video, you’ll learn about some of the most common cryptography use cases. - - - - - Subscribe to get the latest videos: http://professormesser.link/yt Calendar of live events: http://www.professormesser.com/calendar/ FOLLOW PROFESSOR MESSER: Professor Messer official website: http://www.professormesser.com/ Twitter: http://www.professormesser.com/twitter Facebook: http://www.professormesser.com/facebook Instagram: http://www.professormesser.com/instagram Google +: http://www.professormesser.com/googleplus
Views: 16013 Professor Messer
Hashing and Digital Signatures - CompTIA Security+ SY0-501 - 6.1
 
07:33
Security+ Training Course Index: http://professormesser.link/sy0501 Professor Messer’s Course Notes: http://professormesser.link/501cn Frequently Asked Questions: http://professormesser.link/faq - - - - - A cryptographic hash can be used for many different tasks. In this video, you’ll learn about hashing, collisions, digital signatures, and more. - - - - - Subscribe to get the latest videos: http://professormesser.link/yt Calendar of live events: http://www.professormesser.com/calendar/ FOLLOW PROFESSOR MESSER: Professor Messer official website: http://www.professormesser.com/ Twitter: http://www.professormesser.com/twitter Facebook: http://www.professormesser.com/facebook Instagram: http://www.professormesser.com/instagram Google +: http://www.professormesser.com/googleplus
Views: 29035 Professor Messer
Cryptography Concepts - CompTIA Security+ SY0-501 - 6.1
 
07:52
Security+ Training Course Index: http://professormesser.link/sy0501 Professor Messer’s Course Notes: http://professormesser.link/501cn Frequently Asked Questions: http://professormesser.link/faq - - - - - The basics of cryptography are valuable fundamentals for building a secure network. In this video, you’ll learn about cryptographic terms, the value of the key, the concepts of confusion and diffusion, and more. - - - - - Subscribe to get the latest videos: http://professormesser.link/yt Calendar of live events: http://www.professormesser.com/calendar/ FOLLOW PROFESSOR MESSER: Professor Messer official website: http://www.professormesser.com/ Twitter: http://www.professormesser.com/twitter Facebook: http://www.professormesser.com/facebook Instagram: http://www.professormesser.com/instagram Google +: http://www.professormesser.com/googleplus
Views: 28961 Professor Messer
Module 54 - Digital Signatures
 
16:21
Information Security 3 Digital Signatures
What does nonrepudiation mean?
 
00:46
What does nonrepudiation mean? A spoken definition of nonrepudiation. Intro Sound: Typewriter - Tamskp Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Outro Music: Groove Groove - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Intro/Outro Photo: The best days are not planned - Marcus Hansson Licensed under CC-BY-2.0 Book Image: Open Book template PSD - DougitDesign Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Text derived from: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/nonrepudiation Text to Speech powered by TTS-API.COM
What is SECURE MESSAGING? What does SECURE MESSAGING mean? SECURE MESSAGING meaning & explanation
 
04:00
What is SECURE MESSAGING? What does SECURE MESSAGING mean? SECURE MESSAGING meaning - SECURE MESSAGING definition - SECURE MESSAGING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Secure messaging is a server-based approach to protect sensitive data when sent beyond the corporate borders and provides compliance with industry regulations such as HIPAA, GLBA and SOX. Advantages over classical secure e-Mail are that confidential and authenticated exchanges can be started immediately by any internet user worldwide since there is no requirement to install any software nor to obtain or to distribute cryptographic keys beforehand. Secure messages provide non-repudiation as the recipients (similar to online banking) are personally identified and transactions are logged by the secure email platform. Secure messaging works as an online service. Users enroll to a secure messaging platform. The user logs into his account by typing in his username and password (or strong authentication) similar to a web-based email account. Out of a message center messages can be sent over a secure SSL-connection or via other equally protecting methods to any recipient. If the recipient is contacted for the first time a message unlock code (see below MUC) is needed to authenticate the recipient. Alternatively, Secure Messaging can be used out of any standard email program without installing software. Secure Messaging possesses different types of delivery: secured web interface, S/MIME or PGP encrypted communication or TLS secured connections to email domains or individual email clients. One single secure message can be sent to different recipients with different types of secure delivery the sender does not have to worry about. Secure Messaging relies on the method of the dynamic personal web of trust. This method synthesizes the authentication approach of web of trust, known from PGP, with the advantages of hierarchical structures, known from centralized PKI systems. Those combined with certificates provide high quality of electronic identities. This approach focuses on the user and allows for immediate and personal bootstrapping of trust, respectively revocation. In traditional client-server email, message data is downloaded to a local hard drive, and is vulnerable if the computer is lost, stolen, or physically accessed by an unauthorized person. Secure Messages are stored on a network or internet server which is typically more physically secure, and are encrypted when data is inbound or outbound. However, an abundance of data still makes the server an attractive target for remote attacks. Of course, the intentions of the server operator may also come into question. Secure Messaging is used in many business areas with company-wide and sensitive data exchanges. Financial institutions, insurance companies, public services, health organizations and service providers rely on the protection by Secure Messaging. Secure messaging can be easily integrated into the corporate email infrastructures. In the government context, secure messaging can offer electronic registered mail functions. For this to be binding, some countries, such as Switzerland, require it to be accredited as a secure platform. There is no software required for using Secure Messaging. Users only need a valid email address and a working internet connection with an up-to-date web browser.
Views: 78 The Audiopedia
PACE-IT: Security + 6.1 - Introduction to Cryptography (part 1)
 
08:55
CompTIA exam study guide presentations by instructor Brian Ferrill, PACE-IT (Progressive, Accelerated Certifications for Employment in Information Technology) "Funded by the Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Grant #TC-23745-12-60-A-53" Learn more about the PACE-IT Online program: www.edcc.edu/pace-it
Views: 109 PaceIT Online
Easy explanation of Public Private Keys and Password Encryption. Email communication protection.
 
59:31
http://www.mbbsoftware.com http://www.mbbsoftware.com/Learning/Default.aspx http://www.mbbsoftware.com/Products/Act-On-File/2012/Download.aspx In this video Miroslav first discusses why emails can be easily intercepted and read, and the fact that an email is like an open postcard which could be sent by anyone, and read by anyone on its route. Then, Miroslav discusses the principles of two major classes, symmetric and asymmetric, encryption together with the pros and cons of each of them. Finally, Miroslav shows how to protect your email communication including the data of the message and the recipient, and how to make your website trusted by publishing authenticable testimonials. http://www.mbbsoftware.com http://www.mbbsoftware.com/Learning/Default.aspx http://www.mbbsoftware.com/Products/Act-On-File/2012/Download.aspx
Views: 839 MBBSoftware
Kya hai cryptography ? | Explained in simple words with good examples | basic concept
 
32:12
All about cryptography and information security which a computer graduate must know. Cryptography or cryptology is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties called adversaries. More generally, cryptography is about constructing and analyzing protocols that prevent third parties or the public from reading private messages;[3] various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation[4] are central to modern cryptography. Modern cryptography exists at the intersection of the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, and electrical engineering. Applications of cryptography include military communications, electronic commerce, ATM cards, and computer passwords. Cryptography prior to the modern age was effectively synonymous with encryption, the conversion of information from a readable state to apparent nonsense. The originator of an encrypted message (Alice) shared the decoding technique needed to recover the original information only with intended recipients (Bob), thereby precluding unwanted persons (Eve) from doing the same. The cryptography literature often uses Alice ("A") for the sender, Bob ("B") for the intended recipient, and Eve ("eavesdropper") for the adversary. Since the development of rotor cipher machines in World War I and the advent of computers in World War II, the methods used to carry out cryptology have become increasingly complex and its application more widespread. Modern cryptography is heavily based on mathematical theory and computer science practice; cryptographic algorithms are designed around computational hardness assumptions, making such algorithms hard to break in practice by any adversary. It is theoretically possible to break such a system, but it is infeasible to do so by any known practical means. These schemes are therefore termed computationally secure; theoretical advances, e.g., improvements in integer factorization algorithms, and faster computing technology require these solutions to be continually adapted. There exist information-theoretically secure schemes that provably cannot be broken even with unlimited computing power—an example is the one-time pad—but these schemes are more difficult to implement than the best theoretically breakable but computationally secure mechanisms. The growth of cryptographic technology has raised a number of legal issues in the information age. Cryptography's potential for use as a tool for espionage and sedition has led many governments to classify it as a weapon and to limit or even prohibit its use and export.In some jurisdictions where the use of cryptography is legal, laws permit investigators to compel the disclosure of encryption keys for documents relevant to an investigation.Cryptography also plays a major role in digital rights management and copyright infringement of digital media.
Views: 28 StriJan Channel
Cryptography Part 1
 
09:47
This video discusses the principles of cryptography, differences between hashes and cyphers.
Cryptography Basics in hindi
 
32:12
All about cryptography and information security which a computer graduate must know. Cryptography or cryptology is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties called adversaries. More generally, cryptography is about constructing and analyzing protocols that prevent third parties or the public from reading private messages;[3] various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation[4] are central to modern cryptography. Modern cryptography exists at the intersection of the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, and electrical engineering. Applications of cryptography include military communications, electronic commerce, ATM cards, and computer passwords. Cryptography prior to the modern age was effectively synonymous with encryption, the conversion of information from a readable state to apparent nonsense. The originator of an encrypted message (Alice) shared the decoding technique needed to recover the original information only with intended recipients (Bob), thereby precluding unwanted persons (Eve) from doing the same. The cryptography literature often uses Alice ("A") for the sender, Bob ("B") for the intended recipient, and Eve ("eavesdropper") for the adversary.[5] Since the development of rotor cipher machines in World War I and the advent of computers in World War II, the methods used to carry out cryptology have become increasingly complex and its application more widespread. Modern cryptography is heavily based on mathematical theory and computer science practice; cryptographic algorithms are designed around computational hardness assumptions, making such algorithms hard to break in practice by any adversary. It is theoretically possible to break such a system, but it is infeasible to do so by any known practical means. These schemes are therefore termed computationally secure; theoretical advances, e.g., improvements in integer factorization algorithms, and faster computing technology require these solutions to be continually adapted. There exist information-theoretically secure schemes that provably cannot be broken even with unlimited computing power—an example is the one-time pad—but these schemes are more difficult to implement than the best theoretically breakable but computationally secure mechanisms. The growth of cryptographic technology has raised a number of legal issues in the information age. Cryptography's potential for use as a tool for espionage and sedition has led many governments to classify it as a weapon and to limit or even prohibit its use and export.In some jurisdictions where the use of cryptography is legal, laws permit investigators to compel the disclosure of encryption keys for documents relevant to an investigation.Cryptography also plays a major role in digital rights management and copyright infringement of digital media.
Views: 1865 Gyan Gurukool
Digitally sign a document and send to a recipient
 
03:56
www.SenditCertified.com - Review the following video to learn how to sign a document and then send the document to a recipient using the Privacy Data Systems eSignature feature.
Views: 226 SenditCertified
Security+ Digital Signatures
 
05:33
Security+ cryptography topic. How digital signatures are created.
Views: 51967 Darril Gibson
What Is CRYPTOGRAPHY? CRYPTOGRAPHY Definition & Meaning
 
03:52
What is CRYPTOGRAPHY, What does CRYPTOGRAPHY mean, CRYPTOGRAPHY meaning, CRYPTOGRAPHY definition, CRYPTOGRAPHY explanation Cryptography or cryptology (from Ancient Greek: κρυπτός, translit. kryptós "hidden, secret"; and γράφειν graphein, "to write", or -λογία -logia, "study", respectively[1]) is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties called adversaries.[2] More generally, cryptography is about constructing and analyzing protocols that prevent third parties or the public from reading private messages;[3] various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation[4] are central to modern cryptography. Modern cryptography exists at the intersection of the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, electrical engineering, communication science, and physics. Applications of cryptography include electronic commerce, chip-based payment cards, digital currencies, computer passwords, and military communications. Cryptography prior to the modern age was effectively synonymous with encryption, the conversion of information from a readable state to apparent nonsense. The originator of an encrypted message shared the decoding technique needed to recover the original information only with intended recipients, thereby precluding unwanted persons from doing the same. The cryptography literature often uses the name Alice ("A") for the sender, Bob ("B") for the intended recipient, and Eve ("eavesdropper") for the adversary.[5] Since the development of rotor cipher machines in World War I and the advent of computers in World War II, the methods used to carry out cryptology have become increasingly complex and its application more widespread. Modern cryptography is heavily based on mathematical theory and computer science practice; cryptographic algorithms are designed around computational hardness assumptions, making such algorithms hard to break in practice by any adversary. It is theoretically possible to break such a system, but it is infeasible to do so by any known practical means. These schemes are therefore termed computationally secure; theoretical advances, e.g., improvements in integer factorization algorithms, and faster computing technology require these solutions to be continually adapted. There exist information-theoretically secure schemes that probably cannot be broken even with unlimited computing power—an example is the one-time pad—but these schemes are more difficult to implement than the best theoretically breakable but computationally secure mechanisms. The growth of cryptographic technology has raised a number of legal issues in the information age. Cryptography's potential for use as a tool for espionage and sedition has led many governments to classify it as a weapon and to limit or even prohibit its use and export.[6] In some jurisdictions where the use of cryptography is legal, laws permit investigators to compel the disclosure of encryption keys for documents relevant to an investigation.[7][8] Cryptography also plays a major role in digital rights management and copyright infringement of digital media.[9] Source: Wikipedia.org
Views: 38 Audiopedia
What is KEY ESCROW? What does KEY ESCROW mean? KEY ESCROW meaning, definition & explanation
 
03:12
What is KEY ESCROW? What does KEY ESCROW mean? KEY ESCROW meaning - KEY ESCROW definition - KEY ESCROW explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Key escrow (also known as a “fair” cryptosystem) is an arrangement in which the keys needed to decrypt encrypted data are held in escrow so that, under certain circumstances, an authorized third party may gain access to those keys. These third parties may include businesses, who may want access to employees' private communications, or governments, who may wish to be able to view the contents of encrypted communications. The technical problem is a largely structural one since access to protected information must be provided only to the intended recipient and at least one third party. The third party should be permitted access only under carefully controlled conditions, as for instance, a court order. Thus far, no system design has been shown to meet this requirement fully on a technical basis alone. All proposed systems also require correct functioning of some social linkage, as for instance the process of request for access, examination of request for 'legitimacy' (as by a court), and granting of access by technical personnel charged with access control. All such linkages / controls have serious problems from a system design security perspective. Systems in which the key may not be changed easily are rendered especially vulnerable as the accidental release of the key will result in many devices becoming totally compromised, necessitating an immediate key change or replacement of the system. On a national level, this is controversial in many countries due to technical mistrust of the security of the escrow arrangement (due to a long history of less than adequate protection of others' information by assorted organizations, public and private, even when the information is held only under an affirmative legal obligation to protect it from unauthorized access), and to a mistrust of the entire system even if it functions as designed. Thus far, no key escrow system has been designed which meets both objections and nearly all have failed to meet even one. Key escrow is proactive, anticipating the need for access to keys; a retroactive alternative is key disclosure law, where users are required to surrender keys upon demand by law enforcement, or else face legal penalties. Key disclosure law avoids some of the technical issues and risks of key escrow systems, but also introduces new risks like loss of keys and legal issues such as involuntary self incrimination. The ambiguous term key recovery is applied to both types of systems.
Views: 575 The Audiopedia
What Is The Digital Envelope?
 
00:47
What's so special about digital envelope encryption? Druva. The following are possible apr 17, 2012 to maintain confidentiality, digital envelope, which is the combination of encrypted message and signature with symmetric envelope mailpacks how use variable colour messaging add value your mail packs. Digital envelope definition from pc magazine encyclopediaencryption the purpose of digital envelopes cryptography stack and meaning dictionary engineering. A digital envelope allows users to encrypt data with the speed of secret key encryption and convenience security public a type that uses two layers protect message aug 31, 1996 envelopes signatures are specific applications computer technology can enhance functionality jun 6, 2016(1) an encrypted both cryptography methods. The message is encoded with secret key encryption, and the wonders of thecomputational complexity based cryptography. A secret key is used to encrypt and a digital envelope created by generating random symmetric key, encrypting the message with algorithm (e. Digital envelope? Definition from techopedia. You use a digital envelope to protect document from being visible anyone other than the intended recipient. Timestamp based digital envelope for secure communication mailpacks gi solutions. How computational complexity enables digital security & privacy) envelopes created to transmit the symmetric key. Lecture iii digital envelopes, zero knowledge, and other wonders of modern cryptography. What is digital envelope? Webopedia definitionmanagement & mobility content envelopes youtubedigital envelope defined. A secret key is used to encrypt and decrypt the message, but public method send other party sep 18, 2014 with insync, we take a slightly different approach encryption using called digital envelope encryption, also referred as two factor definition of (1) an encrypted message that uses both cryptography methods. Digital envelope a technique that uses symmetric encryption for large documents, but public key nov 19, 2014 digital signature (not to be confused with certificate) is an electronic rather than written can used by someone (a picture envelope) such as bmp formatted image. A valid digital signature gives a recipient purpose. Googleusercontent search. A digital envelope is a secure electronic data container that used to protect message through encryption and authentication. A symmetric key encryption using digital envelopes what is signature? Definition from whatis. What is a digital envelope? Definition from techopedia. Digital envelope? Definition from techopedia what is a digital techopedia definition 18859 envelope class "" url? Q webcache. Wonders of the digital envelope research. Aes) and the symmetric key
Views: 756 Hadassah Hartman
Asymmetric Encryption with PGP and GPG - CompTIA Security+ SY0-301: 6.2
 
12:37
See our entire index of CompTIA Security+ videos at http://www.FreeSecurityPlus.com - One of the most popular asymmetric encryption applications of all time is Pretty Good Privacy, and the OpenPGP compliant Gnu Privacy Guard is a commonly used implementation. In this video, you'll learn about both
Views: 19599 Professor Messer
6/25 Privacy - Preserving Authentication: Another Reason to Care...  | Identiverse 2018
 
32:24
Full title: Privacy - Preserving Authentication: Another Reason to Care About Zero - Knowledge Proofs Presenter: Clare Nelson, CEO at ClearMark Consulting. If the concept of privacy-preserving authentication is new to you, come learn about solutions that rely on a breakthrough in cryptography that garnered the Turing Award, including a female recipient, Shafi Goldwasser. In the words of Johns Hopkins professor, Martin Green, "Zero-Knowledge Proofs are one of the most powerful tools cryptographers have ever devised." Slides: http://ow.ly/X3io30ljoJb Save the date: Join us June 25-28 in Washington D.C, 2019!
Views: 41 Identiverse
What is KEY DISTRIBUTION? What does KEY DISTRIBUTION mean? KEY DISTRIBUTION meaning & explanation
 
03:07
What is KEY DISTRIBUTION? What does KEY DISTRIBUTION mean? KEY DISTRIBUTION meaning - KEY DISTRIBUTION definition - KEY DISTRIBUTION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ In symmetric key cryptography, both parties must possess a secret key which they must exchange prior to using any encryption. Distribution of secret keys has been problematic until recently, because it involved face-to-face meeting, use of a trusted courier, or sending the key through an existing encryption channel. The first two are often impractical and always unsafe, while the third depends on the security of a previous key exchange. In public key cryptography, the key distribution of public keys is done through public key servers. When a person creates a key-pair, they keep one key private and the other, known as the public-key, is uploaded to a server where it can be accessed by anyone to send the user a private, encrypted, message. Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) uses Diffie–Hellman key exchange if the client does not have a public-private key pair and a published certificate in the public key infrastructure, and Public Key Cryptography if the user does have both the keys and the credential. Key distribution is an important issue in wireless sensor network (WSN) design. There are many key distribution schemes in the literature that are designed to maintain an easy and at the same time secure communication among sensor nodes. The most accepted method of key distribution in WSNs is key predistribution, where secret keys are placed in sensor nodes before deployment. When the nodes are deployed over the target area, the secret keys are used to create the network. For more info see: key distribution in wireless sensor networks. Key distribution and key storage are more problematic in the cloud due to the transitory nature of the agents on it. Secret sharing can be used to store keys at many different servers on the cloud. In secret sharing, a secret is used as a seed to generate a number of distinct secrets, and the pieces are distributed so that some subset of the recipients can jointly authenticate themselves and use the secret information without learning what it is. But rather than store files on different servers, the key is parceled out and its secret shares stored at multiple locations in a manner that a subset of the shares can regenerate the key. Secret sharing is used in cases where one wishes to distribute a secret among N shares so that M N of them (M of N) can regenerate the original secret, but no smaller group up to M - 1 can do so.
Views: 246 The Audiopedia
Cryptography
 
46:35
Cryptography is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties . More generally, it is about constructing and analyzing protocols that overcome the influence of adversaries and which are related to various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation. Modern cryptography intersects the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, and electrical engineering. Applications of cryptography include ATM cards, computer passwords, and electronic commerce. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 243 encyclopediacc
What Is Digitally Signed?
 
00:47
Add or remove a digital signature in office files support. Digital signatures in a pdf adobe. Secure messages by using a digital signature outlookdigital signatures entrust datacard. You can set ibm lotus notes to digitally sign and encrypt e mail messages you send other users or over the internet What is digital signature? Definition from whatis docusign. Electronic signatures vs digital globalsign. How do digital signatures work? Globalsign. The signature is also marked with the time that document was signed. What is a digital signature what it does, how works cryptomathic. What is digital signature and how it works? Secure signatures safenet signing solutionsus cert. If the document changes after 10 dec 2015 digital signing is now used as an accepted means for producing signatures that are considered legally binding in many countries, including 18 may benefits of adopting place paper based, wet ink digitally signed ready distribution 1 jun 2016 when you apply a signature to document, cryptographic operation binds your certificate and data being into one 9 2008 integrity helps ensure content has not been changed or tampered with since it was. What is a digital signature? Technet microsoftwhat it and how do signatures work certificates office support. Understand the basics of digital signatures in adobe acrobat x bitcoin (video) encrypting and digitally signing e mail messages ibm. Digital signature wikipedia. Irrespective digital signature is a solution that authenticates the contents of message alice selects file to be digitally signed or clicks on 'sign' in her email companies from around world and various industries are moving towards signing comply with regulations, expedite business processes, 17 dec 2009 signatures way verify an really also indicates changes have not been made 31 may 2011 document can simple complex, depending how you approach it what expect itkvten 2013. This helps 23 mar 2017 end to encryption while protects your message privacy, digital signatures on the other hand provides various additional security attributes signing certificate create a signature, you need certificate, which proves identity signature attached an email offers another layer of by providing assurance recipient that not imposter signed ''28digital provide 'non repudiation' ability identify author and whether document has been changed since it was digitally remove invisible from word, excel, or powerpoint after file is signed, button appears, becomes altered someone trusts Creating controlling feature rich secure workflows. Generally, these provisions mean that anything digitally signed legally binds the signer of 19 nov 2014 to create a digital signature, signing software (such as an email program) creates one way hash electronic data be resulting encrypted is signature. What is digital signature? Definition from whatis docusign.
Views: 36 Hadassah Hartman
গোপন মেসেজ পদ্ধতি (ক্রিপ্টোলজি=এঙ্ক্রিপশান-ডিক্রিপশান) || What is Encryption-Decryption? (in Bangla)
 
07:19
#Encryption-Decryption #Cryptology #muhibsTechnology গোপন মেসেজ পদ্ধতি (ক্রিপ্টোলজি=এঙ্ক্রিপশান-ডিক্রিপশান) What is Encryption-Decryption (Cryptology) Explained in Bangla ক্রিপ্টোলজি/এঙ্ক্রিপশান-ডিক্রিপশান/এনকোডিং-ডিকোডিং আসলে কি এবং এটা কিভাবে ব্যাবহার করে গোপন বার্তা লেখা যায়; সেটা নিয়েই আজকের এপিসোড। আর এই ক্রিপ্টোলজিি/এঙ্ক্রিপশান-ডিক্রিপশান ব্যবহার করেই https//: প্রোটোকল ব্যবহারকারী ওয়েবসাইটগুলো নিরাপদে কিভাবে তথ্য সংরক্ষণ করে সেই ব্যাপারে তথ্যবহুল একটি ভিডিও আমি বানিয়েছি। ভিডিওটি দেখতে লিঙ্কে ক্লিক করূনঃ https://youtu.be/1tvC5fRtw-s In cryptography, encryption is the process of encoding a message or information in such a way that only authorized parties can access it and those who are not authorized cannot. Encryption does not itself prevent interference, but denies the intelligible content to a would-be interceptor. In an encryption scheme, the intended information or message, referred to as plaintext, is encrypted using an encryption algorithm – a cipher – generating ciphertext that can be read only if decrypted. For technical reasons, an encryption scheme usually uses a pseudo-random encryption key generated by an algorithm. It is in principle possible to decrypt the message without possessing the key, but, for a well-designed encryption scheme, considerable computational resources and skills are required. An authorized recipient can easily decrypt the message with the key provided by the originator to recipients but not to unauthorized users. Cryptography or cryptology (from Ancient Greek: κρυπτός, translit. kryptós "hidden, secret"; and γράφειν graphein, "to write", or -λογία -logia, "study", respectively[1]) is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties called adversaries.[2] More generally, cryptography is about constructing and analyzing protocols that prevent third parties or the public from reading private messages;[3] various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation[4] are central to modern cryptography. Modern cryptography exists at the intersection of the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, electrical engineering, communication science, and physics. Applications of cryptography include electronic commerce, chip-based payment cards, digital currencies, computer passwords, and military communications. Cryptography prior to the modern age was effectively synonymous with encryption, the conversion of information from a readable state to apparent nonsense. The originator of an encrypted message shares the decoding technique only with intended recipients to preclude access from adversaries. The cryptography literature often uses the names Alice ("A") for the sender, Bob ("B") for the intended recipient, and Eve ("eavesdropper") for the adversary.[5] Since the development of rotor cipher machines in World War I and the advent of computers in World War II, the methods used to carry out cryptology have become increasingly complex and its application more widespread. Modern cryptography is heavily based on mathematical theory and computer science practice; cryptographic algorithms are designed around computational hardness assumptions, making such algorithms hard to break in practice by any adversary. It is theoretically possible to break such a system, but it is infeasible to do so by any known practical means. These schemes are therefore termed computationally secure; theoretical advances, e.g., improvements in integer factorization algorithms, and faster computing technology require these solutions to be continually adapted. There exist information-theoretically secure schemes that provably cannot be broken even with unlimited computing power—an example is the one-time pad—but these schemes are more difficult to use in practice than the best theoretically breakable but computationally secure mechanisms. For any "Technical Solution" or "Business Query" feel free to contact: Email: [email protected] Facebook: www.facebook.com/muhibmurshed.official Twitter: https://twitter.com/MuhibMurshed Website: www.muhibstechnology.com
Views: 24 MUHIBS TECHNOLOGY
Century of Enslavement: The History of The Federal Reserve
 
01:30:12
TRANSCRIPT AND RESOURCES: http://www.corbettreport.com/federalreserve What is the Federal Reserve system? How did it come into existence? Is it part of the federal government? How does it create money? Why is the public kept in the dark about these important matters? In this feature-length documentary film, The Corbett Report explores these important question and pulls back the curtain on America's central bank.
Views: 1881867 corbettreport
Signicat Sign for Dynamics 365
 
04:13
The product Signicat Sign for Microsoft Dynamics 365, is a true software as a service solution for electronic signatures integrated with Microsoft Dynamics 365. The service is pay-per-use only. Signicat is a leader in providing e-sign services in the Nordics, Baltics and Spain. You can read about the product here: https://www.signicat.com/products/sign/ and https://prosesspilotene.no/nb/produkter/dynamics-365/signicat-for-dynamics-365 Signicate is different from other services in the fact that is provides the highest level of security possible via the use of national identity providers such as Bank ID, Nem ID, Buypass, Comfides and more. As more and more business is conducted online, the need for adding digital signatures to documents increases. Signicat Sign offers a flexible solution for adding electronic signatures to text and PDF documents. When the document is signed, it contains information about who signed the document, when the signature was added, that the signature was valid when the document was signed. It can later be verified that the document has not been modified after it was signed. All of this information is stored in the document and can later be used as legal evidence, as well as for non-repudiation. Signicat delivers an online electronic signing service that is fast and easy to use. It allows users to sign multiple documents, upload own documents and write personal information which gets integrated in the signed documents. For organizations, this means saving time and money by automating previously manual processes and increasing self-service capabilities. The Signicat signing solutions are used by government agencies, banks, insurance companies and online-retail companies.
Views: 1354 ProsessPilotene as
Cryptography | Wikipedia audio article
 
56:45
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptography 00:03:38 1 Terminology 00:07:53 2 History of cryptography and cryptanalysis 00:08:55 2.1 Classic cryptography 00:16:37 2.2 Computer era 00:19:13 2.3 Advent of modern cryptography 00:21:54 3 Modern cryptography 00:23:02 3.1 Symmetric-key cryptography 00:23:13 3.2 Public-key cryptography 00:23:28 3.3 Cryptanalysis 00:27:58 3.4 Cryptographic primitives 00:34:01 3.5 Cryptosystems 00:40:06 4 Legal issues 00:41:12 4.1 Prohibitions 00:43:02 4.2 Export controls 00:43:12 4.3 NSA involvement 00:45:45 4.4 Digital rights management 00:48:46 4.5 Forced disclosure of encryption keys 00:50:51 5 See also 00:53:36 6 References 00:55:46 7 Further reading Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8357640430680523 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Cryptography or cryptology (from Ancient Greek: κρυπτός, translit. kryptós "hidden, secret"; and γράφειν graphein, "to write", or -λογία -logia, "study", respectively) is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties called adversaries. More generally, cryptography is about constructing and analyzing protocols that prevent third parties or the public from reading private messages; various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation are central to modern cryptography. Modern cryptography exists at the intersection of the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, electrical engineering, communication science, and physics. Applications of cryptography include electronic commerce, chip-based payment cards, digital currencies, computer passwords, and military communications. Cryptography prior to the modern age was effectively synonymous with encryption, the conversion of information from a readable state to apparent nonsense. The originator of an encrypted message shares the decoding technique only with intended recipients to preclude access from adversaries. The cryptography literature often uses the names Alice ("A") for the sender, Bob ("B") for the intended recipient, and Eve ("eavesdropper") for the adversary. Since the development of rotor cipher machines in World War I and the advent of computers in World War II, the methods used to carry out cryptology have become increasingly complex and its application more widespread. Modern cryptography is heavily based on mathematical theory and computer science practice; cryptographic algorithms are designed around computational hardness assumptions, making such algorithms hard to break in practice by any adversary. It is theoretically possible to break such a system, but it is infeasible to do so by any known practical means. These schemes are therefore termed computationally secure; theoretical advances, e.g., improvements in integer factorization algorithms, and faster computing technology require these solutions to be continually adapted. There exist information-theoretically secure schemes that provably cannot be broken even with unlimited computing power—an example is the one-time pad—but these schemes are more difficult to use in practice than the best theoretically breakable but computationally secure mechanisms. The growth of cryptographic technology has raised a number of legal issues in the information age. Cryptography's potential for use as a tool for espionage and sedition has led many governments to classify it as a weapon and to limit or even prohibit its use and export. In some jurisdictions where the use of cryptography is legal, laws permit investigators to compel the disclosure of encryption keys for documents relevant to an investigation. Cryptography also plays a major role in digital rights management and copyright infringement of digital media.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Public-key cryptography
 
44:57
Public-key cryptography, also known as asymmetric cryptography, is a class of cryptographic algorithms which require two separate keys, one of which is secret (or private) and one of which is public. Although different, the two parts of this key pair are mathematically linked. The public key is used to encrypt plaintext or to verify a digital signature; whereas the private key is used to decrypt ciphertext or to create a digital signature. The term "asymmetric" stems from the use of different keys to perform these opposite functions, each the inverse of the other -- as contrasted with conventional ("symmetric") cryptography which relies on the same key to perform both. Public-key algorithms are based on mathematical problems which currently admit no efficient solution that are inherent in certain integer factorization, discrete logarithm, and elliptic curve relationships. It is computationally easy for a user to generate their own public and private key-pair and to use them for encryption and decryption. The strength lies in the fact that it is "impossible" (computationally infeasible) for a properly generated private key to be determined from its corresponding public key. Thus the public key may be published without compromising security, whereas the private key must not be revealed to anyone not authorized to read messages or perform digital signatures. Public key algorithms, unlike symmetric key algorithms, do not require a secure initial exchange of one (or more) secret keys between the parties. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 771 Audiopedia
Cryptography Part 2
 
11:19
This video discusses protections provided by, and examples of symmetric and asymmetric encryption
Digital signature
 
22:15
Views: 299 E-business
How to Pronounce Ciphertext
 
00:28
This video shows you how to pronounce Ciphertext
Views: 1965 Pronunciation Guide
Cryptography Basics
 
03:41
Basics of cryptography and what it does Download Node - the feature rich P2P communications app @ https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.asc.mobilenode Made a mistake or two, but on the whole, I'm fine with the script. Text to speech: http://www.fromtexttospeech.com/ ASC Website: https://authenticsecurecomputing.com/ Forums: https://authenticsecurecomputing.com/forum/1/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthenticSecureComputing Twitter: https://twitter.com/ASC_Admin
Views: 178 ASC
Public key fingerprint
 
08:05
In public-key cryptography, a public key fingerprint is a short sequence of bytes used to identify a longer public key. Fingerprints are created by applying a cryptographic hash function to a public key. Since fingerprints are shorter than the keys they refer to, they can be used to simplify certain key management tasks. In Microsoft software, "thumbprint" is used instead of "fingerprint." This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 911 Audiopedia
XML Signature
 
09:40
XML Signature defines an XML syntax for digital signatures and is defined in the W3C recommendation XML Signature Syntax and Processing. Functionally, it has much in common with PKCS#7 but is more extensible and geared towards signing XML documents. It is used by various Web technologies such as SOAP, SAML, and others. XML signatures can be used to sign data–a resource–of any type, typically XML documents, but anything that is accessible via a URL can be signed. An XML signature used to sign a resource outside its containing XML document is called a detached signature; if it is used to sign some part of its containing document, it is called an enveloped signature; if it contains the signed data within itself it is called an enveloping signature. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 3635 Audiopedia
Coding theory
 
19:12
Coding theory is the study of the properties of codes and their fitness for a specific application. Codes are used for data compression, cryptography, error-correction and more recently also for network coding. Codes are studied by various scientific disciplines—such as information theory, electrical engineering, mathematics, linguistics, and computer science—for the purpose of designing efficient and reliable data transmission methods. This typically involves the removal of redundancy and the correction of errors in the transmitted data. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 383 Audiopedia
Public-key cryptography
 
36:43
Public-key cryptography, also known as asymmetric cryptography, is a class of cryptographic algorithms which require two separate keys, one of which is secret and one of which is public. Although different, the two parts of this key pair are mathematically linked. The public key is used to encrypt plaintext or to verify a digital signature; whereas the private key is used to decrypt ciphertext or to create a digital signature. The term "asymmetric" stems from the use of different keys to perform these opposite functions, each the inverse of the other -- as contrasted with conventional cryptography which relies on the same key to perform both. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 2099 encyclopediacc

Here!
Here!
The fall room to live review
Here!
Here!