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Nonrepudiation Meaning
 
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Video shows what nonrepudiation means. Assurance that a contract cannot later be denied by either of the parties involved.. Assurance that the claimed sender or recipient is in fact the party who sent or received a given message.. Nonrepudiation Meaning. How to pronounce, definition audio dictionary. How to say nonrepudiation. Powered by MaryTTS, Wiktionary
Views: 805 ADictionary
What is NONREPUDIATION? What does NONREPUDIATION mean? NONREPUDIATION meaning & explanation
 
04:58
What is NONREPUDIATION? What does NONREPUDIATION mean? NONREPUDIATION meaning - NONREPUDIATION pronunciation - NONREPUDIATION definition - NONREPUDIATION explanation - How to pronounce NONREPUDIATION? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Non-repudiation refers to a state of affairs where the author of a statement will not be able to successfully challenge the authorship of the statement or validity of an associated contract. The term is often seen in a legal setting wherein the authenticity of a signature is being challenged. In such an instance, the authenticity is being "repudiated". In a general sense non-repudiation involves associating actions or changes to a unique individual. For a secure area, for example, it may be desirable to implement a key card access system. Non-repudiation would be violated if it were not also a strictly enforced policy to prohibit sharing of the key cards and to immediately report lost or stolen cards. Otherwise determining who performed the action of opening the door cannot be trivially determined. Similarly, for computer accounts, the individual owner of the account must not allow others to use that account, especially, for instance, by giving away their account's password, and a policy should be implemented to enforce this. This prevents the owner of the account from denying actions performed by the account. Regarding digital security, the cryptological meaning and application of non-repudiation shifts to mean: A service that provides proof of the integrity and origin of data. An authentication that can be asserted to be genuine with high assurance. Proof of data integrity is typically the easiest of these requirements to accomplish. A data hash, such as SHA2, is usually sufficient to establish that the likelihood of data being undetectably changed is extremely low. Even with this safeguard, it is still possible to tamper with data in transit, either through a man-in-the-middle attack or phishing. Due to this flaw, data integrity is best asserted when the recipient already possesses the necessary verification information. The most common method of asserting the digital origin of data is through digital certificates, a form of public key infrastructure to which digital signatures belong. Note that the public key scheme is not used for encryption in this form; i.e. the goal is not to achieve confidentiality, since a message signed with a private key can be read by anyone using the public key. Verifying the digital origin means that the certified/signed data can be, with reasonable certainty, trusted to be from somebody who possesses the private key corresponding to the signing certificate. If the key is not properly safeguarded by the original owner, digital forgery can become a major concern. The ways in which a party may attempt to repudiate a signature present a challenge to the trustworthiness of the signatures themselves. The standard approach to mitigating these risks is to involve a trusted third party. The two most common TTPs are forensic analysts and notaries. A forensic analyst specializing in handwriting can look at a signature, compare it to a known valid signature, and make a reasonable assessment of the legitimacy of the first signature. A notary provides a witness whose job is to verify the identity of an individual by checking other credentials and affixing their certification that the party signing is who they claim to be. Further, a notary provides the extra benefit of maintaining independent logs of their transactions, complete with the type of credential checked and another signature that can independently be verified by the preceding forensic analyst. For this double security, notaries are the preferred form of verification. On the digital side, the only TTP is the repository for public key certificates. This provides the recipient with the ability to verify the origin of an item even if no direct exchange of the public information has ever been made. The digital signature, however, is forensically identical in both legitimate and forged uses - if someone possesses the private key they can create a "real" signature. The protection of the private key is the idea behind the United States Department of Defense's Common Access Card (CAC), which never allows the key to leave the card and therefore necessitates the possession of the card in addition to the personal identification number (PIN) code necessary to unlock the card for permission to use it for encryption and digital signatures.
Views: 3546 The Audiopedia
What Is Non Repudiation?
 
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However, that is not correct the non repudiation service can be viewed as an extension to identification and authentication. Non repudiation wikipedia. Non repudiation is a legal concept that 20 oct 2016 this article sheds light on the two approaches to achieve non of an electronic message emission and assurance someone cannot deny validity something (nr) one security services (or dimensions as defined in document x. 805 by the itu) for point to point communications. What is non repudiation? Definition and meaning why banks need repudiation of origin really repudiable with digital signatures? . What is nonrepudiation? Definition from techopedia. What is the difference between authenticity and non repudiation? What repudiation? Principles, techniques best practices. Secure 19 dec 2016 a definition of non repudiation with several common examples service provides assurance the origin or delivery data in order to protect sender against false denial by recipient that has public key technology is traditionally defined as inability person (to whom been bound recognized certification definition, act repudiatingNon wikipedia. What is non repudiation in network security? Non slovnk potaov informatiky a st. Non repudiation is a much desired property in the digital world. What is nonrepudiation? Webopedia definition. Non repudiation wikipedia non refers to a state of affairs where the author statement will not be able successfully challenge authorship or validity in general, nonrepudiation is ability ensure that party contract communication cannot deny authenticity their signature on document means transferred message has been sent and received by parties claiming have along with digital signatures, public keys can problem when it comes if recipient exposed, either knowingly 31 aug 2011 some people taught provided through crypto mathematics alone. In this lesson, you'll learn more non repudiation nepopiratelnost. This article describes that property and shows how it can be definition of non repudiation general intent to accept one's obligation under a contract bound for its performance 29 aug 2016 understanding achieve emission origin in banking transactions 14 jun 2017 what does mean? Repudiation means reject or deny the validity something. Non repudiation and digital signature infosec resources. Vlastnost, kter umon pozdj dkaz o manipulaci s daty vetn jejich doruen, pvodu, pedn apod 9 jan 2014 introduction. Rant about non repudiation the world stddefine at dictionary. Understanding non repudiation of origin and what is repudiation? Cryptomathicnetwork, information computer security lab 5 examples simplicable. In general, non repudiation applies when data is 27 feb 2017 a typ
Views: 303 Hadassah Hartman
Principles of Network Security and Cryptography
 
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In this video tutorial we study the basic principles of Network security and also see the concept of Cryptography by understanding a basic example. Principles of Network Security to be discussed in this video are as follows: Confidentiality Authentication Integrity Non-repudiation Access Control Availability We will also learn the concept of Cryptography in this tutorial. Here's the definition of Cryptography: Cryptography is the art of achieving security by encoding messages to make them non-readable This video is a continuation of the previous video so make sure you check that video as well so that you get to know some basics of Network security. Download the FREE Network Security App on Google Playstore for Android - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.intelisenze.networksecuritytutorials Simple Snippets on Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/simplesnippets/ Simple Snippets on Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/simplesnipp... Simple Snippets Google Plus Page- https://plus.google.com/+SimpleSnippets Simple Snippets email ID- [email protected] Download my FREE Network Security Android App - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.intelisenze.networksecuritytutorials For Classroom Coaching in Mumbai for Programming & other IT/CS Subjects Checkout UpSkill Infotech - https://upskill.tech/ UpSkill is an Ed-Tech Company / Coaching Centre for Information Technology / Computer Science oriented courses and offer coacing for various Degree courses like BSc.IT, BSc.CS, BCA, MSc.IT, MSc.CS, MCA etc. Contact via email /call / FB /Whatsapp for more info email - [email protected] We also Provide Certification courses like - Android Development Web Development Java Developer Course .NET Developer Course Check us out on Social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram, Google etc Facebook page - https://www.facebook.com/upskillinfotech/ Insta page - https://www.instagram.com/upskill_infotech/ Google Maps - https://goo.gl/maps/vjNtZazLzW82
Views: 22650 Simple Snippets
Digital signature
 
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Digital signature A digital signature is a mathematical scheme for demonstrating the authenticity of a digital message or documents.A valid digital signature gives a recipient reason to believe that the message was created by a known sender, that the sender cannot deny having sent the message (authentication and non-repudiation), and that the message was not altered in transit (integrity). -Video is targeted to blind users Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA image source in video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V04mSwoYC6Y
Views: 6 WikiAudio
How to achieve integrity and authenticity with Message Authentication Code MAC ?
 
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The protocol for generating and verifying a message authentication code MAC is based on a secret key k shared by the sender and the recipient and is performed using a cryptographic algorithm A. The sender sends not only the bare message m, but follows the message with its corresponding message authentication code MAC. The MAC is computed from the common algorithm A with the secret key k, as follows: MAC=A_k(m) The system does not prevent Mr. X from altering the original message m and its MAC to the new message m' and its corresponding message authentication code MAC'. Now it is the recipient's turn to act. He very much wants to know whether the message received is the one that was sent. In order to check this, he simulates the sender's procedure. He applies the algorithm A with key k to the received message m' and verifies whether the result coincides with the received message authentication code MAC'. If A_k(m') is not equal to MAC', then the recipient knows for certain that something has happened ! and he consequently does not trust the message and reject it. If, however, A_k(m') is equal to MAC' then he reasonably certain that the message was not changed. Of course, this certainty relies heavily on the strength of the cryptographic algorithm A and the number of possible keys. Let us keep in mind the underlying philosophy: Mr. X's deception is foiled since he must find the corresponding message authentication code MAC for his message m', which he cannot do because he does not know the secret key k. The mechanism of the MAC is a tool for achieving message integrity and message authenticity. If the verification works, then the recipient also know that the message is authentic because the sender is the only other person who knows the secret key k. (selected from Cryptology by Albrecht Beutelspacher) This video was downloaded and edited from Message Authentication & Confidentiality @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CpBupc7qIkQ
Views: 184 satnamo
what is cryptography and network security
 
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It is a mono-alphabetic cipher wherein each letter of the plaintext is substituted by another letter to form the ciphertext. It is a simplest form of substitution cipher scheme Modern cryptography uses sophisticated mathematical equations (algorithms) and secret keys to encrypt and decrypt data. Today, cryptography is used to provide secrecy and integrity to our data, and both authentication and anonymity to our communications. Network security attacks and services https://youtu.be/-ZHWhaLInik What is network security explained in minutes https://youtu.be/vqavFou2oxk Predefined functions in PHP https://youtu.be/ewmWqm2H-AA Cryptography or cryptology (from Greek κρυπτός kryptós, "hidden, secret"; and γράφειν graphein, "to write", or -λογία -logia, "study", respectively[1]) is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties called adversaries.[2] More generally, cryptography is about constructing and analyzing protocols that prevent third parties or the public from reading private messages;[3] various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation[4] are central to modern cryptography. Modern cryptography exists at the intersection of the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, electrical engineering, communication science, and physics. Applications of cryptography include electronic commerce, chip-based payment cards, digital currencies, computer passwords, and military communications. Cryptography prior to the modern age was effectively synonymous with encryption, the conversion of information from a readable state to apparent nonsense. The originator of an encrypted message shared the decoding technique needed to recover the original information only with intended recipients, thereby precluding unwanted persons from doing the same. The cryptography literature often uses the name Alice ("A") for the sender, Bob ("B") for the intended recipient, and Eve ("eavesdropper") for the adversary.[5] Since the development of rotor cipher machines in World War I and the advent of computers in World War II, the methods used to carry out cryptology have become increasingly complex and its application more widespread. Modern cryptography is heavily based on mathematical theory and computer science practice; cryptographic algorithms are designed around computational hardness assumptions, making such algorithms hard to break in practice by any adversary. It is theoretically possible to break such a system, but it is infeasible to do so by any known practical means. These schemes are therefore termed computationally secure; theoretical advances, e.g., improvements in integer factorization algorithms, and faster computing technology require these solutions to be continually adapted. There exist information-theoretically secure schemes that probably cannot be broken even with unlimited computing power—an example is the one-time pad—but these schemes are more difficult to implement than the best theoretically breakable but computationally secure mechanisms. The growth of cryptographic technology has raised a number of legal issues in the information age. Cryptography's potential for use as a tool for espionage and sedition has led many governments to classify it as a weapon and to limit or even prohibit its use and export.[6] In some jurisdictions where the use of cryptography is legal, laws permit investigators to compel the disclosure of encryption keys for documents relevant to an investigation.[7][8] Cryptography also plays a major role in digital rights management and copyright infringement of digital media.[9] -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- How to install wordpress in xampp step by step https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdwMhXX-FLE How to create menu and submenu in wordpress https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PACC3farNPY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8kG3JTbGAbw How to install wordpress theme with demo data free How to change footer copyright in wordpress https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3oIkPWYXyyQ How to change footer widget in wordpress https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HbnBbZX9tA How to backup & restore your wordpress website in 3 minutes free 2018 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSr5w4U36c8 How to use the revolution slider plugin with Button Link - full tutorial 2018 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KMBFxOlObx4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5jbofGMOHM How to add new user role in wordpress How To Add YouTube Video To Your WordPress Website 2018 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jCWQ7oA2bBA How to add contact form 7 in wordpress page https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E9U27FOPNyo How to change favicon in wordpress theme https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvczOIqdVYk How to use tubebuddy on youtube - 2018 full tutorial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1zpn3sT-2o How to add additional css in wordpress 2018 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2L7lHf_0C-E -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 252 The Coding Bus
Cryptography Basics in hindi
 
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All about cryptography and information security which a computer graduate must know. Cryptography or cryptology is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties called adversaries. More generally, cryptography is about constructing and analyzing protocols that prevent third parties or the public from reading private messages;[3] various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation[4] are central to modern cryptography. Modern cryptography exists at the intersection of the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, and electrical engineering. Applications of cryptography include military communications, electronic commerce, ATM cards, and computer passwords. Cryptography prior to the modern age was effectively synonymous with encryption, the conversion of information from a readable state to apparent nonsense. The originator of an encrypted message (Alice) shared the decoding technique needed to recover the original information only with intended recipients (Bob), thereby precluding unwanted persons (Eve) from doing the same. The cryptography literature often uses Alice ("A") for the sender, Bob ("B") for the intended recipient, and Eve ("eavesdropper") for the adversary.[5] Since the development of rotor cipher machines in World War I and the advent of computers in World War II, the methods used to carry out cryptology have become increasingly complex and its application more widespread. Modern cryptography is heavily based on mathematical theory and computer science practice; cryptographic algorithms are designed around computational hardness assumptions, making such algorithms hard to break in practice by any adversary. It is theoretically possible to break such a system, but it is infeasible to do so by any known practical means. These schemes are therefore termed computationally secure; theoretical advances, e.g., improvements in integer factorization algorithms, and faster computing technology require these solutions to be continually adapted. There exist information-theoretically secure schemes that provably cannot be broken even with unlimited computing power—an example is the one-time pad—but these schemes are more difficult to implement than the best theoretically breakable but computationally secure mechanisms. The growth of cryptographic technology has raised a number of legal issues in the information age. Cryptography's potential for use as a tool for espionage and sedition has led many governments to classify it as a weapon and to limit or even prohibit its use and export.In some jurisdictions where the use of cryptography is legal, laws permit investigators to compel the disclosure of encryption keys for documents relevant to an investigation.Cryptography also plays a major role in digital rights management and copyright infringement of digital media.
Views: 1595 Gyan Gurukool
Cryptography
 
46:35
Cryptography is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties . More generally, it is about constructing and analyzing protocols that overcome the influence of adversaries and which are related to various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation. Modern cryptography intersects the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, and electrical engineering. Applications of cryptography include ATM cards, computer passwords, and electronic commerce. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 238 encyclopediacc
Digital signature
 
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A digital signature is a mathematical scheme for demonstrating the authenticity of a digital message or document. A valid digital signature gives a recipient reason to believe that the message was created by a known sender, such that the sender cannot deny having sent the message (authentication and non-repudiation) and that the message was not altered in transit (integrity). Digital signatures are commonly used for software distribution, financial transactions, and in other cases where it is important to detect forgery or tampering. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 224 Audiopedia
Hashing and Digital Signatures - CompTIA Security+ SY0-501 - 6.1
 
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Security+ Training Course Index: http://professormesser.link/sy0501 Professor Messer’s Course Notes: http://professormesser.link/501cn Frequently Asked Questions: http://professormesser.link/faq - - - - - A cryptographic hash can be used for many different tasks. In this video, you’ll learn about hashing, collisions, digital signatures, and more. - - - - - Subscribe to get the latest videos: http://professormesser.link/yt Calendar of live events: http://www.professormesser.com/calendar/ FOLLOW PROFESSOR MESSER: Professor Messer official website: http://www.professormesser.com/ Twitter: http://www.professormesser.com/twitter Facebook: http://www.professormesser.com/facebook Instagram: http://www.professormesser.com/instagram Google +: http://www.professormesser.com/googleplus
Views: 19424 Professor Messer
Cryptography Concepts - CompTIA Security+ SY0-501 - 6.1
 
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Security+ Training Course Index: http://professormesser.link/sy0501 Professor Messer’s Course Notes: http://professormesser.link/501cn Frequently Asked Questions: http://professormesser.link/faq - - - - - The basics of cryptography are valuable fundamentals for building a secure network. In this video, you’ll learn about cryptographic terms, the value of the key, the concepts of confusion and diffusion, and more. - - - - - Subscribe to get the latest videos: http://professormesser.link/yt Calendar of live events: http://www.professormesser.com/calendar/ FOLLOW PROFESSOR MESSER: Professor Messer official website: http://www.professormesser.com/ Twitter: http://www.professormesser.com/twitter Facebook: http://www.professormesser.com/facebook Instagram: http://www.professormesser.com/instagram Google +: http://www.professormesser.com/googleplus
Views: 19662 Professor Messer
Kya hai cryptography ? | Explained in simple words with good examples | basic concept
 
32:12
All about cryptography and information security which a computer graduate must know. Cryptography or cryptology is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties called adversaries. More generally, cryptography is about constructing and analyzing protocols that prevent third parties or the public from reading private messages;[3] various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation[4] are central to modern cryptography. Modern cryptography exists at the intersection of the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, and electrical engineering. Applications of cryptography include military communications, electronic commerce, ATM cards, and computer passwords. Cryptography prior to the modern age was effectively synonymous with encryption, the conversion of information from a readable state to apparent nonsense. The originator of an encrypted message (Alice) shared the decoding technique needed to recover the original information only with intended recipients (Bob), thereby precluding unwanted persons (Eve) from doing the same. The cryptography literature often uses Alice ("A") for the sender, Bob ("B") for the intended recipient, and Eve ("eavesdropper") for the adversary. Since the development of rotor cipher machines in World War I and the advent of computers in World War II, the methods used to carry out cryptology have become increasingly complex and its application more widespread. Modern cryptography is heavily based on mathematical theory and computer science practice; cryptographic algorithms are designed around computational hardness assumptions, making such algorithms hard to break in practice by any adversary. It is theoretically possible to break such a system, but it is infeasible to do so by any known practical means. These schemes are therefore termed computationally secure; theoretical advances, e.g., improvements in integer factorization algorithms, and faster computing technology require these solutions to be continually adapted. There exist information-theoretically secure schemes that provably cannot be broken even with unlimited computing power—an example is the one-time pad—but these schemes are more difficult to implement than the best theoretically breakable but computationally secure mechanisms. The growth of cryptographic technology has raised a number of legal issues in the information age. Cryptography's potential for use as a tool for espionage and sedition has led many governments to classify it as a weapon and to limit or even prohibit its use and export.In some jurisdictions where the use of cryptography is legal, laws permit investigators to compel the disclosure of encryption keys for documents relevant to an investigation.Cryptography also plays a major role in digital rights management and copyright infringement of digital media.
Views: 19 StriJan Channel
Cryptography Use Cases - CompTIA Security+ SY0-501 - 6.1
 
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Security+ Training Course Index: http://professormesser.link/sy0501 Professor Messer’s Course Notes: http://professormesser.link/501cn Frequently Asked Questions: http://professormesser.link/faq - - - - - We use cryptography for many different purposes. In this video, you’ll learn about some of the most common cryptography use cases. - - - - - Subscribe to get the latest videos: http://professormesser.link/yt Calendar of live events: http://www.professormesser.com/calendar/ FOLLOW PROFESSOR MESSER: Professor Messer official website: http://www.professormesser.com/ Twitter: http://www.professormesser.com/twitter Facebook: http://www.professormesser.com/facebook Instagram: http://www.professormesser.com/instagram Google +: http://www.professormesser.com/googleplus
Views: 11106 Professor Messer
Security+ Digital Signatures
 
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Security+ cryptography topic. How digital signatures are created.
Views: 51604 Darril Gibson
What is DIGITAL SIGNATURE? What does DIGITAL SIGNATURE mean? DIGITAL SIGNATURE explanation
 
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What is DIGITAL SIGNATURE? What does DIGITAL SIGNATURE mean? DIGITAL SIGNATURE explanation. A digital signature is a mathematical scheme for demonstrating the authenticity of a digital message or documents. A valid digital signature gives a recipient reason to believe that the message was created by a known sender, that the sender cannot deny having sent the message (authentication and non-repudiation), and that the message was not altered in transit (integrity). Digital signatures are a standard element of most cryptographic protocol suites, and are commonly used for software distribution, financial transactions, contract management software, and in other cases where it is important to detect forgery or tampering. Digital signatures are often used to implement electronic signatures, a broader term that refers to any electronic data that carries the intent of a signature, but not all electronic signatures use digital signatures. In some countries, including the United States, India, Brazil, Saudi Arabia, Switzerland and the countries of the European Union, electronic signatures have legal significance. Digital signatures employ asymmetric cryptography. In many instances they provide a layer of validation and security to messages sent through a nonsecure channel: Properly implemented, a digital signature gives the receiver reason to believe the message was sent by the claimed sender. Digital seals and signatures are equivalent to handwritten signatures and stamped seals. Digital signatures are equivalent to traditional handwritten signatures in many respects, but properly implemented digital signatures are more difficult to forge than the handwritten type. Digital signature schemes, in the sense used here, are cryptographically based, and must be implemented properly to be effective. Digital signatures can also provide non-repudiation, meaning that the signer cannot successfully claim they did not sign a message, while also claiming their private key remains secret; further, some non-repudiation schemes offer a time stamp for the digital signature, so that even if the private key is exposed, the signature is valid. Digitally signed messages may be anything representable as a bitstring: examples include electronic mail, contracts, or a message sent via some other cryptographic protocol.
Views: 1734 The Audiopedia
What is SECURE MESSAGING? What does SECURE MESSAGING mean? SECURE MESSAGING meaning & explanation
 
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What is SECURE MESSAGING? What does SECURE MESSAGING mean? SECURE MESSAGING meaning - SECURE MESSAGING definition - SECURE MESSAGING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Secure messaging is a server-based approach to protect sensitive data when sent beyond the corporate borders and provides compliance with industry regulations such as HIPAA, GLBA and SOX. Advantages over classical secure e-Mail are that confidential and authenticated exchanges can be started immediately by any internet user worldwide since there is no requirement to install any software nor to obtain or to distribute cryptographic keys beforehand. Secure messages provide non-repudiation as the recipients (similar to online banking) are personally identified and transactions are logged by the secure email platform. Secure messaging works as an online service. Users enroll to a secure messaging platform. The user logs into his account by typing in his username and password (or strong authentication) similar to a web-based email account. Out of a message center messages can be sent over a secure SSL-connection or via other equally protecting methods to any recipient. If the recipient is contacted for the first time a message unlock code (see below MUC) is needed to authenticate the recipient. Alternatively, Secure Messaging can be used out of any standard email program without installing software. Secure Messaging possesses different types of delivery: secured web interface, S/MIME or PGP encrypted communication or TLS secured connections to email domains or individual email clients. One single secure message can be sent to different recipients with different types of secure delivery the sender does not have to worry about. Secure Messaging relies on the method of the dynamic personal web of trust. This method synthesizes the authentication approach of web of trust, known from PGP, with the advantages of hierarchical structures, known from centralized PKI systems. Those combined with certificates provide high quality of electronic identities. This approach focuses on the user and allows for immediate and personal bootstrapping of trust, respectively revocation. In traditional client-server email, message data is downloaded to a local hard drive, and is vulnerable if the computer is lost, stolen, or physically accessed by an unauthorized person. Secure Messages are stored on a network or internet server which is typically more physically secure, and are encrypted when data is inbound or outbound. However, an abundance of data still makes the server an attractive target for remote attacks. Of course, the intentions of the server operator may also come into question. Secure Messaging is used in many business areas with company-wide and sensitive data exchanges. Financial institutions, insurance companies, public services, health organizations and service providers rely on the protection by Secure Messaging. Secure messaging can be easily integrated into the corporate email infrastructures. In the government context, secure messaging can offer electronic registered mail functions. For this to be binding, some countries, such as Switzerland, require it to be accredited as a secure platform. There is no software required for using Secure Messaging. Users only need a valid email address and a working internet connection with an up-to-date web browser.
Views: 53 The Audiopedia
What does nonrepudiation mean?
 
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What does nonrepudiation mean? A spoken definition of nonrepudiation. Intro Sound: Typewriter - Tamskp Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Outro Music: Groove Groove - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Intro/Outro Photo: The best days are not planned - Marcus Hansson Licensed under CC-BY-2.0 Book Image: Open Book template PSD - DougitDesign Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Text derived from: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/nonrepudiation Text to Speech powered by TTS-API.COM
Module 54 - Digital Signatures
 
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Information Security 3 Digital Signatures
Cryptography Part 1
 
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This video discusses the principles of cryptography, differences between hashes and cyphers.
What is MULTICAST ENCRYPTION? What does MULTICAST ENCRYPTION mean? MULTICAST ENCRYPTION meaning
 
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What is MULTICAST ENCRYPTION? What does MULTICAST ENCRYPTION mean? MULTICAST ENCRYPTION meaning - MULTICAST ENCRYPTION definition - MULTICAST ENCRYPTION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Multicast is what enables a node on a network to address one unit of data to a specific group of receivers. In interactive multicast at the data link or network layer, such as IP multicast, Ethernet multicast or MBMS service over cellular network, receivers may join and leave the group using an interaction channel. Only one copy of the data is sent from the source, and multiple copies are created and then sent to the desired recipient by the network infrastructure nodes. In for example IP multicast, a multicast group is identified by a class D IP address. A host enters or exits a group using IGMP (Internet Group Management Protocol). A message sent via multicast is sent to all nodes on the network, but only the intended nodes accept the multicast frames. Multicasting is useful in situations such as video conferencing and online gaming. Multicast was used originally in LANs, with Ethernet being the best example. A problem with multicast communication is that it is difficult to guarantee that only designated receivers receive the data being sent. This is largely because multicast groups are always changing; users come and go at any time. A solution to the problem of ensuring that only the chosen recipient obtains the data is known as multicast encryption. The ISO (International Organization for Standardization) states that confidentiality, integrity, authentication, access control, and non-repudiation should all be considered when creating any secure system. Confidentiality: No unauthorized party can access appropriate messages. Integrity: Messages cannot be changed during transit without being discovered. Authentication: The message needs to be sent by the person/machine who claims to have sent it. Access control: Only those users enabled can access the data. Non-repudiation: The receiver can prove that the sender actually sent the message. To be secure, members who are just being added to the group must be restricted from viewing past data. Also, members removed from a group may not access future data. Today, one alternative in multicast encryption involves the use of symmetric key encryption where data is decoded by intended receivers using a traffic encryption key (TEK). The TEK is changed any time a member joins or leaves the group. This is not feasible for large groups. Users must be continuously connected to obtain the new keys. Another more common method involves asymmetric keys. Here, a private key is shared and those shares are given out asymmetrically. The initial member is given a number of shares, one of which is passed to each group member. If a member has a valid share of the key, he can view the message.
Views: 60 The Audiopedia
Public-key cryptography
 
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Public-key cryptography, also known as asymmetric cryptography, is a class of cryptographic algorithms which require two separate keys, one of which is secret and one of which is public. Although different, the two parts of this key pair are mathematically linked. The public key is used to encrypt plaintext or to verify a digital signature; whereas the private key is used to decrypt ciphertext or to create a digital signature. The term "asymmetric" stems from the use of different keys to perform these opposite functions, each the inverse of the other -- as contrasted with conventional cryptography which relies on the same key to perform both. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 2094 encyclopediacc
Cryptography Basics
 
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Basics of cryptography and what it does Download Node - the feature rich P2P communications app @ https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.asc.mobilenode Made a mistake or two, but on the whole, I'm fine with the script. Text to speech: http://www.fromtexttospeech.com/ ASC Website: https://authenticsecurecomputing.com/ Forums: https://authenticsecurecomputing.com/forum/1/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthenticSecureComputing Twitter: https://twitter.com/ASC_Admin
Views: 169 ASC
Most Famous Paintings With Hidden Codes
 
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Thanks for watching... Mona Lisa https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mona_Lisa The Last Supper https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Last_Supper_(Leonardo_da_Vinci) The Creation of Adam https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Creation_of_Adam Sistine Chapel ceiling https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sistine_Chapel_ceiling https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sistine_Chapel The Madonna with Saint Giovannino https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Madonna_with_Saint_Giovannino.jpg Prophet Zechariah https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zechariah_(Hebrew_prophet) David and Goliath https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goliath Netherlandish Proverbs https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netherlandish_Proverbs The Supper at Emmaus https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supper_at_Emmaus_(Caravaggio),_London Young Mozart's Portrait https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolfgang_Amadeus_Mozart Source: http://www.oddee.com/item_98643.aspx Music: Cantus Firmus Monks,Doug Maxwell; Media Right Productions; YouTube Audio Library Cryptography or cryptology is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties called adversaries. More generally, cryptography is about constructing and analyzing protocols that prevent third parties or the public from reading private messages; various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation are central to modern cryptography. Modern cryptography exists at the intersection of the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, and electrical engineering. Applications of cryptography include ATM cards, computer passwords, and electronic commerce. Cryptography prior to the modern age was effectively synonymous with encryption, the conversion of information from a readable state to apparent nonsense. The originator of an encrypted message (Alice) shared the decoding technique needed to recover the original information only with intended recipients (Bob), thereby precluding unwanted persons (Eve) from doing the same. The cryptography literature often uses Alice ("A") for the sender, Bob ("B") for the intended recipient, and Eve ("eavesdropper") for the adversary.[5] Since the development of rotor cipher machines in World War I and the advent of computers in World War II, the methods used to carry out cryptology have become increasingly complex and its application more widespread. Modern cryptography is heavily based on mathematical theory and computer science practice; cryptographic algorithms are designed around computational hardness assumptions, making such algorithms hard to break in practice by any adversary. It is theoretically possible to break such a system, but it is infeasible to do so by any known practical means. These schemes are therefore termed computationally secure; theoretical advances, e.g., improvements in integer factorization algorithms, and faster computing technology require these solutions to be continually adapted. There exist information-theoretically secure schemes that provably cannot be broken even with unlimited computing power—an example is the one-time pad—but these schemes are more difficult to implement than the best theoretically breakable but computationally secure mechanisms. The growth of cryptographic technology has raised a number of legal issues in the information age. Cryptography's potential for use as a tool for espionage and sedition has led many governments to classify it as a weapon and to limit or even prohibit its use and export. In some jurisdictions where the use of cryptography is legal, laws permit investigators to compel the disclosure of encryption keys for documents relevant to an investigation. Cryptography also plays a major role in digital rights management and copyright infringement of digital media. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptography
Views: 21 VeniVidiVici!
Public-key cryptography
 
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Public-key cryptography, also known as asymmetric cryptography, is a class of cryptographic algorithms which require two separate keys, one of which is secret (or private) and one of which is public. Although different, the two parts of this key pair are mathematically linked. The public key is used to encrypt plaintext or to verify a digital signature; whereas the private key is used to decrypt ciphertext or to create a digital signature. The term "asymmetric" stems from the use of different keys to perform these opposite functions, each the inverse of the other -- as contrasted with conventional ("symmetric") cryptography which relies on the same key to perform both. Public-key algorithms are based on mathematical problems which currently admit no efficient solution that are inherent in certain integer factorization, discrete logarithm, and elliptic curve relationships. It is computationally easy for a user to generate their own public and private key-pair and to use them for encryption and decryption. The strength lies in the fact that it is "impossible" (computationally infeasible) for a properly generated private key to be determined from its corresponding public key. Thus the public key may be published without compromising security, whereas the private key must not be revealed to anyone not authorized to read messages or perform digital signatures. Public key algorithms, unlike symmetric key algorithms, do not require a secure initial exchange of one (or more) secret keys between the parties. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 754 Audiopedia
Digitally sign a document and send to a recipient
 
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www.SenditCertified.com - Review the following video to learn how to sign a document and then send the document to a recipient using the Privacy Data Systems eSignature feature.
Views: 224 SenditCertified
CCNA-Security-210-260-Describe Confidentiality, Integrity, Availability
 
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Security Concepts 1.1 Common security principles 1.1.a Describe confidentiality, integrity, availability (CIA) These are the three basic components of information security. Three primary goals of Network Security are Confidentiality, Integrity and Availability: Confidentiality: The first goal of Network Security is "Confidentiality". The function of "Confidentiality" is in protecting precious business data (in Storage or in Motion) from unauthorized persons. Confidentiality part of Network Security makes sure that the data is available only to intended and authorized persons. Access to business data should be only for those individuals who are permitted to use that data. Integrity: The second goal of Network Security is "Integrity". Integrity aims at maintaining and assuring the accuracy and consistency of data. The function of Integrity is to make sure that the date is accurate and reliable and is not changed by unauthorized persons or hackers. The data received by the recipient must be exactly same as the data sent from the sender, without change in even single bit of data. Availability: The third goal of network security is "Availability". The function of "Availability" in Network Security is to make sure that the Data, Network Resources or Network Services are continuously available to the legitimate users, whenever they require it
Views: 572 Ahmad Ali
Easy explanation of Public Private Keys and Password Encryption. Email communication protection.
 
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http://www.mbbsoftware.com http://www.mbbsoftware.com/Learning/Default.aspx http://www.mbbsoftware.com/Products/Act-On-File/2012/Download.aspx In this video Miroslav first discusses why emails can be easily intercepted and read, and the fact that an email is like an open postcard which could be sent by anyone, and read by anyone on its route. Then, Miroslav discusses the principles of two major classes, symmetric and asymmetric, encryption together with the pros and cons of each of them. Finally, Miroslav shows how to protect your email communication including the data of the message and the recipient, and how to make your website trusted by publishing authenticable testimonials. http://www.mbbsoftware.com http://www.mbbsoftware.com/Learning/Default.aspx http://www.mbbsoftware.com/Products/Act-On-File/2012/Download.aspx
Views: 820 MBBSoftware
Cryptography Part 2
 
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This video discusses protections provided by, and examples of symmetric and asymmetric encryption
What Is Digitally Signed?
 
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Add or remove a digital signature in office files support. Digital signatures in a pdf adobe. Secure messages by using a digital signature outlookdigital signatures entrust datacard. You can set ibm lotus notes to digitally sign and encrypt e mail messages you send other users or over the internet What is digital signature? Definition from whatis docusign. Electronic signatures vs digital globalsign. How do digital signatures work? Globalsign. The signature is also marked with the time that document was signed. What is a digital signature what it does, how works cryptomathic. What is digital signature and how it works? Secure signatures safenet signing solutionsus cert. If the document changes after 10 dec 2015 digital signing is now used as an accepted means for producing signatures that are considered legally binding in many countries, including 18 may benefits of adopting place paper based, wet ink digitally signed ready distribution 1 jun 2016 when you apply a signature to document, cryptographic operation binds your certificate and data being into one 9 2008 integrity helps ensure content has not been changed or tampered with since it was. What is a digital signature? Technet microsoftwhat it and how do signatures work certificates office support. Understand the basics of digital signatures in adobe acrobat x bitcoin (video) encrypting and digitally signing e mail messages ibm. Digital signature wikipedia. Irrespective digital signature is a solution that authenticates the contents of message alice selects file to be digitally signed or clicks on 'sign' in her email companies from around world and various industries are moving towards signing comply with regulations, expedite business processes, 17 dec 2009 signatures way verify an really also indicates changes have not been made 31 may 2011 document can simple complex, depending how you approach it what expect itkvten 2013. This helps 23 mar 2017 end to encryption while protects your message privacy, digital signatures on the other hand provides various additional security attributes signing certificate create a signature, you need certificate, which proves identity signature attached an email offers another layer of by providing assurance recipient that not imposter signed ''28digital provide 'non repudiation' ability identify author and whether document has been changed since it was digitally remove invisible from word, excel, or powerpoint after file is signed, button appears, becomes altered someone trusts Creating controlling feature rich secure workflows. Generally, these provisions mean that anything digitally signed legally binds the signer of 19 nov 2014 to create a digital signature, signing software (such as an email program) creates one way hash electronic data be resulting encrypted is signature. What is digital signature? Definition from whatis docusign.
Views: 21 Hadassah Hartman
Digital Envelopes
 
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This video is part of the Udacity course "Intro to Information Security". Watch the full course at https://www.udacity.com/course/ud459
Views: 3228 Udacity
Asymmetric Encryption with PGP and GPG - CompTIA Security+ SY0-301: 6.2
 
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See our entire index of CompTIA Security+ videos at http://www.FreeSecurityPlus.com - One of the most popular asymmetric encryption applications of all time is Pretty Good Privacy, and the OpenPGP compliant Gnu Privacy Guard is a commonly used implementation. In this video, you'll learn about both
Views: 19300 Professor Messer
What Is CRYPTOGRAPHY? CRYPTOGRAPHY Definition & Meaning
 
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What is CRYPTOGRAPHY, What does CRYPTOGRAPHY mean, CRYPTOGRAPHY meaning, CRYPTOGRAPHY definition, CRYPTOGRAPHY explanation Cryptography or cryptology (from Ancient Greek: κρυπτός, translit. kryptós "hidden, secret"; and γράφειν graphein, "to write", or -λογία -logia, "study", respectively[1]) is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties called adversaries.[2] More generally, cryptography is about constructing and analyzing protocols that prevent third parties or the public from reading private messages;[3] various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation[4] are central to modern cryptography. Modern cryptography exists at the intersection of the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, electrical engineering, communication science, and physics. Applications of cryptography include electronic commerce, chip-based payment cards, digital currencies, computer passwords, and military communications. Cryptography prior to the modern age was effectively synonymous with encryption, the conversion of information from a readable state to apparent nonsense. The originator of an encrypted message shared the decoding technique needed to recover the original information only with intended recipients, thereby precluding unwanted persons from doing the same. The cryptography literature often uses the name Alice ("A") for the sender, Bob ("B") for the intended recipient, and Eve ("eavesdropper") for the adversary.[5] Since the development of rotor cipher machines in World War I and the advent of computers in World War II, the methods used to carry out cryptology have become increasingly complex and its application more widespread. Modern cryptography is heavily based on mathematical theory and computer science practice; cryptographic algorithms are designed around computational hardness assumptions, making such algorithms hard to break in practice by any adversary. It is theoretically possible to break such a system, but it is infeasible to do so by any known practical means. These schemes are therefore termed computationally secure; theoretical advances, e.g., improvements in integer factorization algorithms, and faster computing technology require these solutions to be continually adapted. There exist information-theoretically secure schemes that probably cannot be broken even with unlimited computing power—an example is the one-time pad—but these schemes are more difficult to implement than the best theoretically breakable but computationally secure mechanisms. The growth of cryptographic technology has raised a number of legal issues in the information age. Cryptography's potential for use as a tool for espionage and sedition has led many governments to classify it as a weapon and to limit or even prohibit its use and export.[6] In some jurisdictions where the use of cryptography is legal, laws permit investigators to compel the disclosure of encryption keys for documents relevant to an investigation.[7][8] Cryptography also plays a major role in digital rights management and copyright infringement of digital media.[9] Source: Wikipedia.org
Views: 17 Audiopedia
What is KEY DISTRIBUTION? What does KEY DISTRIBUTION mean? KEY DISTRIBUTION meaning & explanation
 
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What is KEY DISTRIBUTION? What does KEY DISTRIBUTION mean? KEY DISTRIBUTION meaning - KEY DISTRIBUTION definition - KEY DISTRIBUTION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ In symmetric key cryptography, both parties must possess a secret key which they must exchange prior to using any encryption. Distribution of secret keys has been problematic until recently, because it involved face-to-face meeting, use of a trusted courier, or sending the key through an existing encryption channel. The first two are often impractical and always unsafe, while the third depends on the security of a previous key exchange. In public key cryptography, the key distribution of public keys is done through public key servers. When a person creates a key-pair, they keep one key private and the other, known as the public-key, is uploaded to a server where it can be accessed by anyone to send the user a private, encrypted, message. Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) uses Diffie–Hellman key exchange if the client does not have a public-private key pair and a published certificate in the public key infrastructure, and Public Key Cryptography if the user does have both the keys and the credential. Key distribution is an important issue in wireless sensor network (WSN) design. There are many key distribution schemes in the literature that are designed to maintain an easy and at the same time secure communication among sensor nodes. The most accepted method of key distribution in WSNs is key predistribution, where secret keys are placed in sensor nodes before deployment. When the nodes are deployed over the target area, the secret keys are used to create the network. For more info see: key distribution in wireless sensor networks. Key distribution and key storage are more problematic in the cloud due to the transitory nature of the agents on it. Secret sharing can be used to store keys at many different servers on the cloud. In secret sharing, a secret is used as a seed to generate a number of distinct secrets, and the pieces are distributed so that some subset of the recipients can jointly authenticate themselves and use the secret information without learning what it is. But rather than store files on different servers, the key is parceled out and its secret shares stored at multiple locations in a manner that a subset of the shares can regenerate the key. Secret sharing is used in cases where one wishes to distribute a secret among N shares so that M N of them (M of N) can regenerate the original secret, but no smaller group up to M - 1 can do so.
Views: 181 The Audiopedia
Key escrow
 
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Key escrow is an arrangement in which the keys needed to decrypt encrypted data are held in escrow so that, under certain circumstances, an authorized third party may gain access to those keys. These third parties may include businesses, who may want access to employees' private communications, or governments, who may wish to be able to view the contents of encrypted communications. The technical problem is a largely structural one since access to protected information must be provided only to the intended recipient and at least one third party. The third party should be permitted access only under carefully controlled conditions, as for instance, a court order. Thus far, no system design has been shown to meet this requirement fully on a technical basis alone. All proposed systems also require correct functioning of some social linkage, as for instance the process of request for access, examination of request for 'legitimacy', and granting of access by technical personnel charged with access control. All such linkages / controls have serious problems from a system design security perspective. Systems in which the key may not be changed easily are rendered especially vulnerable as the accidental release of the key will result in many devices becoming totally compromised, necessitating an immediate key change or replacement of the system. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 606 Audiopedia
What is KEY ESCROW? What does KEY ESCROW mean? KEY ESCROW meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is KEY ESCROW? What does KEY ESCROW mean? KEY ESCROW meaning - KEY ESCROW definition - KEY ESCROW explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Key escrow (also known as a “fair” cryptosystem) is an arrangement in which the keys needed to decrypt encrypted data are held in escrow so that, under certain circumstances, an authorized third party may gain access to those keys. These third parties may include businesses, who may want access to employees' private communications, or governments, who may wish to be able to view the contents of encrypted communications. The technical problem is a largely structural one since access to protected information must be provided only to the intended recipient and at least one third party. The third party should be permitted access only under carefully controlled conditions, as for instance, a court order. Thus far, no system design has been shown to meet this requirement fully on a technical basis alone. All proposed systems also require correct functioning of some social linkage, as for instance the process of request for access, examination of request for 'legitimacy' (as by a court), and granting of access by technical personnel charged with access control. All such linkages / controls have serious problems from a system design security perspective. Systems in which the key may not be changed easily are rendered especially vulnerable as the accidental release of the key will result in many devices becoming totally compromised, necessitating an immediate key change or replacement of the system. On a national level, this is controversial in many countries due to technical mistrust of the security of the escrow arrangement (due to a long history of less than adequate protection of others' information by assorted organizations, public and private, even when the information is held only under an affirmative legal obligation to protect it from unauthorized access), and to a mistrust of the entire system even if it functions as designed. Thus far, no key escrow system has been designed which meets both objections and nearly all have failed to meet even one. Key escrow is proactive, anticipating the need for access to keys; a retroactive alternative is key disclosure law, where users are required to surrender keys upon demand by law enforcement, or else face legal penalties. Key disclosure law avoids some of the technical issues and risks of key escrow systems, but also introduces new risks like loss of keys and legal issues such as involuntary self incrimination. The ambiguous term key recovery is applied to both types of systems.
Views: 375 The Audiopedia
lice, Bob, and Carol want to use secret key cryptography to authentic
 
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lice, Bob, and Carol want to use secret key cryptography to authenticate each other. Compare the security of having a single shared secret that they all share, with the security of having each of them use their own secret (Alice authenticates to either Bob or Carol by proving knowledge of KA, Bob with KB, and Carol with KC). Assume a cryptographic algorithm that is linear in the length of the key to perform good guy operations, e.g., encryption, decryption, key generation, integrity check generation, and integrity check verification; and that it is exponential in the length of the key to perform bad guy operations, e.g., brute force breaking. In a well-crafted document, fully discuss the following items. Provide details and justifications for each item. This should be a 4- to 6-page Microsoft Word document. Cite your sources, wherever required. Advances in computation make computers an order of magnitude faster. Does this work to the advantage of the good guys, the bad guys, or neither? Justify your answer with reasoning. Assuming a very large message and public keys user, describe what information would need to be included in each of the following: Bob sending an unencrypted, signed message to Alice. Bob sending an unencrypted, signed message to multiple recipients (Alice and Carol). Bob sending an encrypted, signed message to Alice. Bob sending an encrypted, signed message to Alice and Carol. Explain efficiency issues and alternate methods that would work but be less efficient. Analyze whether it will be easier to have nonrepudiation with the use of public or private user keys. How about plausible deniability? Support your responses with examples. Cite any sources in APA format. \u00c2
Views: 3 xghxg xghxg
Century of Enslavement: The History of The Federal Reserve
 
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TRANSCRIPT AND RESOURCES: http://www.corbettreport.com/federalreserve What is the Federal Reserve system? How did it come into existence? Is it part of the federal government? How does it create money? Why is the public kept in the dark about these important matters? In this feature-length documentary film, The Corbett Report explores these important question and pulls back the curtain on America's central bank.
Views: 1770091 corbettreport
6/25 Privacy - Preserving Authentication: Another Reason to Care...  | Identiverse 2018
 
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Full title: Privacy - Preserving Authentication: Another Reason to Care About Zero - Knowledge Proofs Presenter: Clare Nelson, CEO at ClearMark Consulting. If the concept of privacy-preserving authentication is new to you, come learn about solutions that rely on a breakthrough in cryptography that garnered the Turing Award, including a female recipient, Shafi Goldwasser. In the words of Johns Hopkins professor, Martin Green, "Zero-Knowledge Proofs are one of the most powerful tools cryptographers have ever devised." Slides: http://ow.ly/X3io30ljoJb Save the date: Join us June 25-28 in Washington D.C, 2019!
Views: 38 Identiverse
PACE-IT: Security + 6.1 - Introduction to Cryptography (part 1)
 
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CompTIA exam study guide presentations by instructor Brian Ferrill, PACE-IT (Progressive, Accelerated Certifications for Employment in Information Technology) "Funded by the Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Grant #TC-23745-12-60-A-53" Learn more about the PACE-IT Online program: www.edcc.edu/pace-it
Views: 105 PaceIT Online
Digital signature
 
22:15
Views: 281 E-business
session35
 
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Coding theory
 
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Coding theory is the study of the properties of codes and their fitness for a specific application. Codes are used for data compression, cryptography, error-correction and more recently also for network coding. Codes are studied by various scientific disciplines—such as information theory, electrical engineering, mathematics, linguistics, and computer science—for the purpose of designing efficient and reliable data transmission methods. This typically involves the removal of redundancy and the correction of errors in the transmitted data. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 312 Audiopedia
W7 Lecture Video
 
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Views: 29 Allison Lindemann
Public key fingerprint
 
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In public-key cryptography, a public key fingerprint is a short sequence of bytes used to identify a longer public key. Fingerprints are created by applying a cryptographic hash function to a public key. Since fingerprints are shorter than the keys they refer to, they can be used to simplify certain key management tasks. In Microsoft software, "thumbprint" is used instead of "fingerprint." This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 811 Audiopedia
mod12lec36
 
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Views: 174 IIT Delhi July 2018
Bitcoin Explained
 
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Find out what bitcoin is and how bitcoin works. Double spending problem https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Double-spending Bitcoin mining https://www.bitcoinmining.com/ Public key cryptography https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSIDS_lvRv4 Hash functions http://mathworld.wolfram.com/HashFunction.html Interactive timeline of bitcoin http://historyofbitcoin.org/ ------------------------------------------------------------------ Plug into BitMerge Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/BitMerge
Views: 206 BitMerge