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What is Jaw Joint Effusion
 
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Jaw joint effusion describes the collection of fluid in the jaw joint. Having a joint effusion means that the joint interior accumulates joint fluid and/or blood. A joint effusion can be caused by anything from rheumatic conditions to mechanical injuries or bad posture. http://www.checkdent.com
Views: 4709 Checkdent
Scanning Technique: Ultrasound-Guided Foot Injection - SonoSite
 
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Visit http://www.sonosite.com/education/ Demonstration of aspiration or injection of the ankle under ultrasound guidance, including probe type, probe position, projected needle path and key anatomy viewed during the exam. Visit http://www.sonosite.com/education/
Views: 58954 SonoSite
Common Foot And Ankle Injections - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes injection techniques for painful conditions of the foot and ankle. Conditions which cause pain and inflammation are treatable with the use of diagnostic and therapeutic injection. Ankle joint The ankle joint is formed by the articulation of the tibia and talus. Injection is done to alleviate pain occurring from trauma, arthritis, gout or other inflammatory conditions. Anterolateral ankle impingement •Can occur due to the build-up of scar tissue in the ankle joint or from the presence of bony spurs. •With the ankle in a neutral position, mark the injection site just above the talus and medial to the tibialis anterior tendon. •The injection site is disinfected with betadine. •The needle is inserted into the identified site and directed posterolaterally. •Injection of the solution into the joint space should flow smoothly without resistance. •Pulling on the foot to distract the ankle joint is helpful. First metatarsophalangeal joint •The MTP joint is a common injection site frequently affected by gout and osteoarthritis. •The injection site is disinfected with betadine. •The needle is inserted on the dorsomedial or dorsolateral surface. •The needle is angled to 60-70 degrees to the plane of the match the slope of the joint. •Injection of the solution into the joint space should flow smoothly without resistance. •Pulling on the big toe is sometimes helpful in distraction of the joint. Peroneal tendonitis •Peroneal tendonitis is an irritation to the tendons that run on the outside area of the ankle, the peroneus longus and peroneus brevis. •The injection site is disinfected with betadine. •Insert the needle carefully in a proximal direction when injecting the peroneus brevis and longus tendon sheath. •Advance the needle distally to inject the peroneus brevis alone at its bony insertion. Achilles tendonitis •Achilles tendonitis is irritation and inflammation of the large tendon in the back of the ankle. Achilles tendonitis is a common overuse injury that occurs in athletes. •Injection of steroid should be given around the tendon, not through the tendon. •Injections directly into the tendon is not recommended due to increased risk of tendon rupture. •Platelets injection can be done through the tendon with needling and fenestration. Tarsal tunnel syndrome •The condition of pain and paresthesia caused by irritation to the posterior tibial nerve. •Feel the pulse of the posterior tibial artery, the nerve is posterior, find the area of maximum tenderness, 1-2 cm above it will be the injection site that is marked on the medial side of the foot and disinfected with betadine. •The solution is injected at an angle of 30 degrees and directed distally. •Warn the patient that the foot may become numb. •Care should be taken In walking an driving. •Usually performed after a treatment program which can include rest, stretching and the use of shoe inserts. Plantar fasciitis •The plantar fascia is a band of connective tissue deep to the fat pad on the plantar aspect of the foot. •Patients with plantar fascia complain of chronic pain symptoms that are often worse in the morning with walking. •The injection site is identified and marked on the medial side of the foot and betadine used. •Avoid injecting through the fat pad at the bottom of the foot to avoid fat atrophy. •The needle is inserted in a medial to lateral direction one finger breathe above the sole of the foot in a line that corresponds to the posterior aspect of the tibia. •The solution is injected past the midline of the width of the foot.
Views: 116079 nabil ebraheim
Ankle Pain, ankle ligaments sprain - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes conditions and treatment methods associated with pain of the ankle. High ankle sprain •A high ankle sprain is a sprain of the syndesmotic ligaments that connect the tibia and fibula at the ankle. •Diagnosis of syndesmotic injury is usually done by the use of external rotation stress view examination or CT scan. This patient may require surgery. Anterolateral impingment •Painful limitation of full range of ankle motion due to soft tissue or osseous (bony) pathology. •Soft tissue thickeneing commonly seen in athletes with prior trauama that extends into the ankle jint. •Arthroscopy of the ankle may be helpful . •Tibisl bone spur impinging on the talus can become a source of chronic ankle pain and limitation of ankle motion in athletes. Osseous (bony) spur on the anterior lip of tibia contacting the talus during dorsiflexion. The patient may need debridment of the spur. Ankle sprain •Pain that is anterior and around the fibula can usually be attributed to a ligament sprain. •Sprains result from the stretching and tearing (partial or complete) of small ligaments that can become damaged when the ankle is forced into an unnatural position. •Treatment includes immobilization, ice therapy, physical therapy and rarely surgery. •With ankle sprain, the patient will be able to walk, but it will be painful. With a fracture, the patient will be unable to walk. Pain that is posterior to the fibula can usually be attributed to an injury of the peroneal tendons. Lateral ankle pain •Patients with peroneal tendon problemes usually describe pain in the outer part of the ankle or just behind the lateral malleolus. •Problems mainly occus in the area where the tendons of the two muscles glide within a fibrous tunnel . Peroneal inflammation/ tendonitis •Tendons are subject to excessive repetitive forces causing pain and swelling. •Peroneal tendon subluxation •Usually occurs secondary to an ankle sprain with retinaculum injury. •Occurs with dorsiflexion and usually eversion of the ankle. Posterior anle pain Achilles tendonitis •Irritation and inflammation due to overuse. •Pain, swelling and tears within the tendon. •Achilles tendon can become prone to injury or rupture with age, lack of use or by aggressive exercises. •The Thompson test is performed to determine the presence of an Achilles tendon rupture. A positive result for the thompson’s test is determined by no movement of the ankle while squeezing of the calf muscles. Posterior ankle impingment •Os trigonum or large posterior process of talus (stieda syndrome) •Common among athletes such as ballet dancers. •May be seen in association with flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis. Tarsal tunnel syndrome •Compression or squeezing on the posterior tibial nerve that produces symptoms of pain and numbness on the medial area of the ankle. •When conservative treatment methods fail, surgical treatment or tarsal tunnel release surgery may be needed. Posterior tibial tendon tears are one of the leading causes of failing arches (flatfoot) in adults. •Too many toes sign •Loss of medial arch height •Pain on the medial ankle with weight bearing Arthritis of the ankle joint •Commonly the result of a prior injury or inflammation to the ankle joint. •Can usually be easily diagnosed with an examination and x-ray. Osteochondral lesion of the talus •Arthroscopic debridment may be necessary. Please go to the following link and support the artist Johnny Widmer in his art contest - Sign to Facebook and click LIKE https://www.facebook.com/marlinmag/photos/a.10153261748858040.1073741838.134227843039/10153261754338040/?type=3&theater Thank you! https://www.facebook.com/JohnnyWidmerArt?fref=ts http://www.johnnywidmer.com/
Views: 617880 nabil ebraheim
Injections Around The Shoulder - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video illustrates injection techniques of the shoulder rotator cuff muscles tear. Injection of the shoulder could be part of the treatment of shoulder pain, especially if the pain is more than what the patient can handle. Shoulder pain will probably hinder the progress of therapy. Which patient is the one who we should inject? 1- Patient has pain with restricted shoulder movement. 2- Patient that has nighttime pain. 3- Patient cannot lie on the shoulder due to pain. Injection is predominantly used for elderly patients with rotator cuff tears or patients with impingement syndrome. Injection usually reduces the pain and inflammation. It can be done either blind or ultrasound guided for injection around the shoulder itself. If the injection being done is for the scapulothoracic joint, give the injection either fluoroscopic or blind. The injection could be done by a posterior, lateral, or anterior approach. I use the lateral and posterior approach. The posterior approach is done 1-2 cm below the posterolateral acromion. I mark the spot for the injection, then I introduce the needle and inject the fluid. The blind injection usually not accurate. Some of the data reports that the accuracy is between 65%-75% is probably not true (probably worse than that). Make sure you do not inject the rotator cuff tendon itself with steroids. When you do blind injection, you probably are injecting to the tendon and you do not know it because you cannot see the tip of the needle. When you use ultrasound guidance, you must see the bursa and find the tip of the needle and distend the bursa. You may do manipulation of the patient’s shoulder manually after administering the injection. When do I give a blind injection? I usually do blind injection the first time that I see the patient, especially if the patient is elderly or if the patient has an impingement syndrome. I will use ultrasound guided injection when patient has severe pain and some restriction of shoulder movement, or if the patient has had previous shoulder surgery. There are multiple points of pain, especially in the shoulder itself such as biceps tendon and AC joint. I personally examine the patient before and after injection. It is a very rewarding experience to see that the patient’s condition improved after ultrasound guided injection. I usually inject steroids, 40 mg kenalog with about 10 mg lidocaine. Cortisone will give short term yet, reasonable relief in some patients. The numbing medication will cause the patient to feel less pain immediately. However, the steroids can negatively affect the tendon and cartilage, causing tendon damage and rupture. The shoulder is not flat. The shoulder is a ball and socket joint and when you inject above the ball (humeral head), you are controlled by the shape of the ball. You may be injecting the tendon despite any good intention of only injecting the subacromial area. You may be unable to reach the area of the subacromial space due to the shape of the proximal humerus. Even with ultrasound guidance, I still have to make multiple modifications to see that the needle actually in the bursa. How many times do I give the patient an injection of steroids? Usually about 3-4 times a year. PRP: has a high level of concentrated growth factors which may help in healing the tissue. A blood specimen is taken from the patient, centrifuged, and then platelet concentrate is obtained and activated before injected in the target area. PRP: is probably good for young, active patients who play sports. These patients may have partial or intrasubstance rotator cuff tears that causes pain which limits activity. PRP may help these patients to avoid surgery and allow for healing of the rotator cuff tear. PRP is usually injected with ultrasound guidance because we can’t afford to do this blindly. We need to be able to see where the problem area is and inject the PRP into the area of this problem. Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC Donate to the University of Toledo Foundation Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Endowed Chair Fund: https://www.utfoundation.org/foundation/home/Give_Online.aspx?sig=29
Views: 109945 nabil ebraheim
Medial Ankle Ligaments
 
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Views: 103916 Catherine Blake
Ankle Arthroscopy and Open Repair
 
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Post-collision injury to talar dome cartilage and associated tear of peroneus brevis tendon. Arthroscopic shaving of joint cartilage defects and suture repair to tendon injuries.
Views: 80295 Trial FX
How to Reverse Arthritis Naturally
 
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Go to https://owners.leadpages.net/ars-prelaunch/ for an early bird special on my latest, and most comprehensive arthritis reversal system. At http://bergmanchiropractic.com and http://Owners-Guide.com we strive to educate people on natural solutions to health. http://SkypePackage.com for online consults. SUBSCRIBE at http://www.youtube.com/user/johnbchiro How to Reverse Arthritis Naturally Degeneration of joints does not occur due to age. Trauma and digestion are the main causes in the degeneration of our joints- which causes wrinkles, and slouching. CALL TOLL FREE 1-855-712-0012 to get bonus materials not on YouTube or text your first name and email plus 89869 to 1-817-591-2905.
Views: 1284851 Dr. John Bergman
Ankle Pain - How To Get Rid
 
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http://www.stressedoutstressfree.com/?p=5331 Pain In The Ankle Ankle pain can prevent you from your daily routine and even make a person depress if it's severe. Like anything else, ankle pain could be view as something small at the beginning but if not taken care right away it will become a big problem.Making sure you maintain appropriate weight, have proper foot wear, have proper posture and doing necessary warming up of the muscles are necessary steps in taking good care of yourself. In This Video You Will Find Out: - How to locate the ligaments - How to work on two ligament - Simple techniques to get rid of it Transcript for Today's Video: Hi welcome to another video. In this video I'm going to share with you with you two question from two viewer about ankle pain, the first viewer hurt his ankle while making a five foot jump on his skateboard, hit on the floor and hurt his ankle three months ago and now he is pain from this pain while trying to do another stunt and the second viewer said that the problem came with age. Let's just take a look at what else can cause ankle pain. Ankle pain can be caused by a sudden twist of the ankle while doing sports like running, playing basketball or walking on uneven surface, also it could be causing from heel pain and last but not least I think also caused by being over weight and your posture and how you hold your body because your ankle holds pretty much your whole body weight. Let's go me show you how to work on two ligaments in this video. Ok I'm going to sit on the sofa to work on this. One leg up and show you how to work on the ankle. First we are going to work on the anterior talofibular ligament right down here, this part here and also the calcaneofibular ligament right here, right underneath this bone here. So we have anterior talofibular ligament and the calcaneofibular ligament right down here. Ok let's zoom in to the leg right here. I want to show you two techniques, to break it down and also put pressure on it. So I'm going to use the index finger. Ankle right here rub it down this way in the area, sometimes it's hard to find the area because it's a tiny area. You can move, do a circle on your ankle to get into the area. Ok! once you find that area start rubbing on it, you can use oil, lotion or without anything. The tendon is this way so you rub against the fiber to break down all the tightness in there. If you have scar tissue you need to complete break it so that it will not reoccur again. Next is also use your index finger find the pain and turn your leg around like this. Move around and once you find the spot, stretch your foot forward and backwards, forward and backwards and as the tightness loosen up try to stretch a little bit extra and come back a little bit more and back, That's to work on anterior talofibular ligament up here and same thing down here, look for the calcaneofibular ligament right here and this ligament goes down this way. Move you ankle around until you find the tightness and rub on it this way. So what you do is rub against this way or this way like such. Find the spot and rub on it, or put your finger on the pain area and turn ok once you find the spot. Then press on it, move a little bit come back press come back. As the area loosen up you can add a little bit more stretch, push it to the back and loosen up that way. To finish up use your pad of the hand to rub the area to warm it up like such or rub, rub, rub it like this or like this with your hands and that's it! Thank you very much for watching, I hope this will help you release your ankle pain and please leave a comment if you have a different technique or any suggestion and don't forget to visit my blog at http://StressedOutStressFree.com and my name is Vincent Woon and I see you in the next video. BE WELL! :-) Recommended Resources: H.E.M. Ankle Rehab Biofreeze For Aches And Pain Join Me On Facebook Or Twitter
Views: 641904 StressedOutStressFre
Ankle Fracture Stretches & Exercises - Ask Doctor Jo
 
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These ankle fracture stretches and exercises should only be done after your broken ankle has healed, and you are cleared by your doctor to start physical therapy. See Doctor Jo’s blog post about this at: http://www.askdoctorjo.com/ankle-fracture-stretches-exercises Often after an ankle fracture, your ankle becomes very stiff and weak. These stretches and exercises should help. The first stretch will be a calf stretch. Start off with your legs out in front of you. You can bend up the leg you aren’t using towards you in a comfortable position. Keep the leg you want to stretch out in front of you. Take a stretch strap, dog leash, belt, or towel and wrap it around the ball of your foot. Relax your foot, and pull the strap towards you stretching your calf muscle. You should feel the stretch under your leg. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds, and do three of them. Now prop your ankle up on a roll or hang your foot off the bed or table so your heel doesn't touch the floor. Put the band around the ball of your foot for good resistance. First, push your foot down and up. This is called ankle plantarflexion. Next you want to wrap the band around your other foot. This time you will have resistance pulling out. This is ankle eversion.Now cross your foot over the foot with the band as seen in the video, and pull your foot inward. This is ankle inversion. The next exercise will be standing up. You want to lean against a wall or something sturdy. Place the foot you want to stretch behind you. Make sure to keep your heel down and your toes forward pointing towards the wall. With the other foot in front of you, like you are in a lunge position, bend your knee towards the wall until you feel a stretch through your back leg. Try to keep your back leg as straight as possible. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds, and do it three times. Then you will bend your back knee, and do the same stretch. This is to stretch the Soleus muscle which is underneath your gastroc. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds, and do it three times. Now is a heel raise off the ground. Stand with your feet about shoulder width apart, come up on your toes as high as you can. Try not to lean forward, but bring your body straight up and slowly come back down. Push off as much as you can so your heel leaves the ground. Start off with ten and work your way up to 20-25. If this becomes easy, then you can do one foot at a time. The last exercise will be a balance series. Stand on one foot, but hold onto something sturdy. Try to balance for 30 seconds to a minute. When that becomes easy, just use one finger one each side. Then just one finger for balance, and finally try balancing without holding on at all. Related Videos: Ankle Strengthening Exercises & Stretches: https://youtu.be/g-iXYapbuqk?list=PLPS8D21t0eO9JGYS958XUh2mkV8Sa2sAq Sprained Ankle Treatment: https://youtu.be/UYM-_k_dWZw?list=PLPS8D21t0eO9JGYS958XUh2mkV8Sa2sAq =========================================== SUBSCRIBE for More Videos: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=askdoctorjo ======================================= Doctor Jo is a Doctor of Physical Therapy. http://www.AskDoctorJo.com http://www.facebook.com/AskDoctorJo http://www.pinterest.com/AskDoctorJo https://www.instagram.com/AskDoctorJo http://www.twitter.com/AskDoctorJo http://plus.google.com/+AskDoctorJo ======================================= Ankle Fracture Stretches & Exercises: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FmJLBlBlNU PRODUCT PLACEMENT DISCLAIMER: This video represents the honest opinions of Doctor Jo. Thank you to King Athletic for providing Doctor Jo with free loop bands to use. DISCLAIMER: This content (the video, description, links, and comments) is not medical advice or a treatment plan and is intended for general education and demonstration purposes only. This content should not be used to self-diagnose or self-treat any health, medical, or physical condition. Don’t use this content to avoid going to your own healthcare professional or to replace the advice they give you. Consult with your healthcare professional before doing anything contained in this content. You agree to indemnify and hold harmless Ask Doctor Jo, LLC and its officers for any and all losses, injuries, or damages resulting from any and all claims that arise from your use or misuse of this content. Ask Doctor Jo, LLC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Use of this content is at your sole risk.
Views: 69344 AskDoctorJo
Foot Ankle
 
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Views: 71 Thu Nguyen
Shin Splints? Or Do You Have a Stress Fracture? 3 Signs Tibia Fracture
 
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Famous Physical Therapists Bob Schrupp and Brad Heineck demonstrate 3 signs that you may have a stress fracture in your shin bone or tibia (instead of shin splints). Make sure to like us on FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/Physical-Therapy-317002538489676/timeline/ Check out the Products Bob and Brad LOVE on their Amazon Channel: https://www.amazon.com/shop/physicaltherapyvideo Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/PtFamous Our book “Three Simple Steps To Treat Back Pain” is available on Kindle http://www.amazon.com/Three-Simple-Steps-Treat-Back-ebook/dp/B00BPU4O5G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1444092626&sr=8-1&keywords=3+simple+steps+to+treat+back+pain
Views: 193921 Physical Therapy Video

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